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Publication numberUS2100421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1937
Filing dateMar 14, 1932
Priority dateMar 14, 1932
Publication numberUS 2100421 A, US 2100421A, US-A-2100421, US2100421 A, US2100421A
InventorsBenjamin F Wupper
Original AssigneeBenjamin F Wupper
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 2100421 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N0V- 30, 1937- B. F. WUPPER 2,100,421

GAME

Filed March 14, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet ll o O %0 oo o o o 0 oa 0o0 o-ao a o o oa o@ 00 00%0 00 0 o o a o 0 0o 00% o a0 0 o 090 0 0 o oo 0 0 00 00| Owl 0 0 il' 0 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 GAME B. F. WUPPER Filed March 14, 1932 Nov. 30, 1937.

NOV. 30, 1937. B F WUPPER 2,100,421

ITA 5 0F STA IA Ques E G RH PH Y (A n Swe s) CHART @@Qca nan.

166 /72 /74 '65 66 @a @wf/VW Patented Nov. 30, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 15 Claims.

My invention relates, generally, to games, and more particularly to a form of game board which may be used for playing a number of different games.

It is an object of my invention to provide an improved game board which may be utilized in playing any type of game in which each of the players, unknown to the other, selects certain psitions on the board which, as an object of the game, are to be discovered by his opponent. The selection referred to may be temporarily registered upon the board, or may be mentally retained by the player, and the salient feature of my invention is the provision of means whereby the opponent may mechanically register his guess as to the selection and whereby the registration made by him will be visible to the other player.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved game board which, with the utilization of suitable masks, may be used to play a large number of different kinds of games.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved game board for playing salvo.

A further object is to provide an improved marker for game boards.

A further object is to provide an improved game which is simple in construction, may be economically manufactured, and which will have the quality of maintaining the interest of adults, as well as of children.

Other objects will appear from time to time in the following description, in which reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a perspective view of one form of my invention;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the construction shown in Figure 1, a portion of the figure being in section to illustrate the method of supporting the board;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the game board;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a marker used with the board, shown in Figure 1;

Figure 5 is an elevational view of a portion of a modified form of my invention;

Figure 6 is a vertical sectional view, taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view, taken on the line 1-1 of Figure 5;

Figure 8 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of a second modified form of my invention, taken on the line 6 8 of Figure 9;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of said second modified form;

Figure 10 is a fragmentary elevational view of the game board of Figures 8 and 9;

Figure 11 is a central vertical sectional view of a third modified form of my invention;

Figure 12 is a vertical sectional view thereof, 5 taken on the line |2--I2 of Figure 11;

Figure 13 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of the board shown in Figure 11;

Figure 14 is a fragmentary plan view of the game board and its support;

Figure 15 is an enlarged perspective view of the markers utilized with the game board shown in Figure 11;

Figures i6 and 17 illustrate forms of charts which may be used with the game board illustrated in Figure 11;

Figure 18 is an elevation of a fourth form of my invention;

Figure 19 is an end elevational view of the form shown in Figure 18;

Figure 20 is an enlarged elevational view of a piercing pin used in connection with the form of my invention shown in Figures 18 and 19, and

Figure 2l is a plan view of a portion of a mask placed upon the game board of the type illustrated in Figure 11, showing how the latter may be used `in playing such games as checkers.

The game board shown in Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, comprises a board which, although referred to as a board, may be made of materials other than wood such, for example, as a phenol condensation product, or hard rubber, or other suitable composition. The board is provided with 'two fields of equally spaced holes 32, each comprising ten rows of ten holes each. While, as herein disclosed, all the forms of my invention are provided with fields of this size, the number of holes may, of course, be increased or decreased as may seem desirable. For the purpose of description, the right hand field of one hundred holes is herein designated the A field, and the left hand field the B field.

Above each of these fields are located groups of holes 34, which are used in registering the score. In the game of salvo, for the playing of which this game board is particularly adapted, the scoring holes above each field comprise a group 36 of four holes, which represent a battleship, a group 38 of three holes, which represent a cruiser, and two groups 4D, I2, each representing a destroyer. In the drawings, the scoring holes for the battleship, the cruiser and the two destroyers are designated, respectively, 36A, 36-A, llla and 42A. These scoring fields may be painted in a distinctive color, as

indicated in Fig. 1, or may assume the figure of a naval ship, with the holes 34 passing through the hull of the ship. The right hand iield A, on each side of the board, is provided with a plurality of horizontal grooves 44, one above each row of holes. Markers 46 (Fig. 4), each comprising a small stamping of sheet steel, sheet celluloid, or similar material, are provided with openings 48 which are considerably larger in diameter than the holes 32, and with an acute angle ilange 50. In the embodiment shown, the flanges 50 of the markers 46 are adapted to t in the grooves 44 rather snugly, so that the marker will lie against the surface of the board. The board may be supported in any suitable way, such, for example, as by a pair of standards 52, each of which has a vertical dovetail groove 54 formed therein to receive the dovetailed lower end portion 56 of the side edges of the board.

A plurality of pins 58 are provded for use with the board, The pins are preferably of different, readily distinguishable colors. For the purposes of illustration, I have found it practicable to provide approximately five groups of twenty-five pins each, iive groups of eighteen pins each, five groups of ten pins each, and five groups of five pins each, each group of pins being of a diierent color. Inasmuch as it is rather dilcult to obtain twenty different colors, each readily distinguishable from the others, approximately half of the groups may, in addition to their color marking, have an additional distinguishing feature. For example, the groups with the fewer number of pins may be distinguished from the other groups by coloring the ends of the pins White, or, the pins themselves may be made square in cross-section instead of circular. Any other suitable means may be used to differentiate the diierent groups of pins, and the pins, in addition to being of distinguishable colors, may have additional designating markings. The pins are, preferably, substantially cylindrical in shape and have beveled or rounded ends. They are made suniciently small in diameter so that they may be readily inserted in the holes 32 and 34, and so that they will practically drop from the board if the latter is shaken While being held in a horizontal position.

The method of playing the game with the apparatus above described is as follows:

The board is placed between the players, in a vertical position, so that each player can see only one side of the board. Each player then places his ships in what he believes to be strategic positions on the field A on his side of the board, by attaching the markers 46 in general as indicated in Fig. 1. Four markers in line represent a battleship, three markers in line a cruiser and two markers in line a destroyer. It is, of course, required that the markers be placed over adjacent holes in the field A, but they may be placed in a horizontal line, a vertical line, or in either diagonal line. Suitable shields, consisting of sheets of cardboard or other material, may be provided to prevent the opponent from watching the player locate his ships by observation through the holes 32 in the field A.

Each player having located his markers in the prescribed manner and the shields having been removed, the playing of the game is conducted in the following manner:

Each player alternately rcs seven salvos" at his opponents ships by inserting seven pins ileld B. The players shoot their salvos alternately and when a player has rfinished ring his salvo, his opponent will report No hits", if none of the pins has been inserted in a hole over which the opponent has placed a marker; but if the player has struck one of his opponents ships, his opponent will indicate this fact by inserting a pin of the same color used in the salvo, in the scoring hole 34 of one of the score fields 36, 38, 48, 42, depending upon which ship has been struck.

The playing of the game is continued in this manner, each player, in turn, firing a salvo of seven shots at his opponents hidden ships until a ship has been completely disabled and placed out of action by having a pin placed in each one of the holes over which the markings for the ship are located. Thereafter, the player whose ship has thus been placed out of action no longer has salvos of seven shots each but, instead, his salvos Will thereafter consist of a. number of shots less than seven-depending upon the type of ship put out of action. Upon having his battleship destroyed the player may, for example, lose three shots; for his cruiser, two shots, and for each of the destroyers, one shot.

The game is continued in this manner until all of the ships of one of the players have been sunk,

Various methods of scoring, which it is believed unnecessary to detail herein, may be employed to increase the interest in the game.

While the game has been described as lbeing played on the principles of naval warfare, it may take the form of a treasure hunt, wherein the markers will represent hidden treasure, instead of battleships, and the insertion of a. pin in a hole will represent the uncovering of a certain spot in a possible eld in which the treasure may be hidden. 'I'he game may also be played as representative of aerial combat or bombing expeditions, or as symbolical of various other incidents.

In Fig. 5, I have shown a modied form of the game board in which the board itself is formed of sheet metal and comprises a single sheet 60, having a plurality of rows and Illes of holes 62 pierced therethrough. 'Ihe arrangement of the holes 62 may be the same as that shown in Fig. 1. Each of the holes has a cylindrical iiange 64 formed by the piercing operation, and a small lug 66 struck upwardly from the flange. The markers comprise rings 68, which may be of metal, celluloid, or any other suitable material, and which may readily be hung over the projecting flanges 64, being prevented from falling therefrom by the lugs 66, The edges of the sheet 60 may have beads or rolls 10 formed thereon to stiien the sheet 60, and the sheet may be supported by a pair of pedestals l2, which are provided with vertical grooves 14 shaped to receive the beads ill formed along the lower portion of the vertical edges of the board.

A plurality of pins, as above described with reference to the board shown in Figure 1, are of course provided with this board, and the game may be played in the manner as above described with reference to said ilgure.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10,

the holes 'I6 are formed by the intersections of relatively wide, horizontal grooves 'I8 cut in one side of the board, and vertical grooves 80 cut in' the opposite side of the board 82. In addition to the grooves 18 and 80 relatively shallow, narrow horizontal grooves 84 are provided to receive markers 86, 88. The grooves 84 may slope inwardly, as indicated in Figs. 8 and 9, or may be in a horizontal plane. The markers 86 are provided for use on that side of the board where the field corresponding to field A, of Fig. 1, is provided with the horizontal groove 18, while the markers 88 are provided for use on that side of the board having the vertical grooves 80. Each of the markers may have an arrowhead, or other suitable pointer, to indicate the selected hole. If

the grooves 84 are cut in a horizontal plane,

instead of in the sloping plane, as shown, the board may be substantially completely formed by two operations on a multiple circular saw.

In Fig. 10, the scoring fields 90 and 32 are shown as marked upon the board and as being provided with drilled scoring holes 94. If desired, however, these holes may likewise be formed by means of horizontal grooves similar to the grooves 18, which extend only a portion of the length of the board.

The board 82 may be supported in any suitable manner such, for example, as by means of pedestals detachably secured to the end edges of the board, as indicated in Fig. 1. The pins 58 may readily be inserted through the holes 16 formed by the intersections of the grooves 18 and 80.

The game board may be used to play the salvo game, as above described, or may be used to play others of the games as mentioned hereinafter. A board constructed in the manner shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10 has a number of advantages in simplicity of the method of manufacture and in economy of production. It, however, has the disadvantage that two different types of markers are necessary, or at least desirable. A further possible disadvantage is that the board should be reasonably thick so as to provide an adquate support for the pins.

In Figs. 11 to 17, inclusive, I have illustrated one of the preferred embodiments of my invention. In this construction, the board 96 is generally similar to the board 30 except that the fields of perforations A and B are placed immediately adjacent each other, so that the right hand file of holes 32 of the field B is spaced from the left hand file of holes of the field A a distance equal to the horizontal spacing between the other files. The two fields A and B thus, together, form a continuous field -of equally spaced perforations, so that the board may be used with greater facility for playing games other than those of the salvo type. Inasmuch as the board 95 is generally similar to the board 30, shown in Fig. l, similar reference characters have been applied to corresponding parts, and such parts will not again be described in detail.

The board 96 is adapted to form the cover of a box comprising end walls 98, |00, side walls |02, |04, which are secured to each other and t0 a bottom |06. The walls |04 are preferably made of wood, while the bottom |06 may be made of Wood or cardboard, or other suitable material. 'I'he sides |02, |04 and the end |00 are each provided with rabbets |08 to receive the board 86. When in use, the board 96 is supported by a pair of brackets ||0, the bifurcated lower ends of which are pivoted to blocks ||2 by means of a pin or pair of nails ||4. The block of wood ||2 may be glued and/or nailed to the end walls 98, |00 of the box. The upper portions of the brackets ||0 are formed to provide a channel ||6 (Fig. 14), adapted to receive the board 95. A pair of offset flanges ||8 are provided on each of the brackets ||0, to form guides and supports for charts |20, as hereinafter to be described. The brackets have inwardly struck lugs |22 formed to close the lower end of the channel portions of the bracket, and serve as a support for the board 96. When not in use, the ,brackets may be swung downwardly into the position shown in dotted lines in Fig. ll, and their upward swinging movement is limited by abutment of the lower portion of the bracket with the adjacent end wall of the box. If desired, one or more partitions |24 may be provided for use in segregating the different groups of the pins used in playing the game.

The field A of the board 86 is provided with shallow grooves |26, which lie in a horizontal plane, one groove above each row of holes 32 in the board. The grooves are cut in a horizontal plane, rather than in the sloping plane indicated in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, in order to reduce the cost of production.

With the horizontal groove, it is desirable to provide a marker |28, as shown in Fig. l5, which has some resilient means to aid in holding the marker in the groove. The marker |28 is provided with a rearwardly extending flange |30, which has a hump or upwardly bent portion |32. The marker is made from sufiiciently resilient material so that the flange |30 thereof may be snapped into a groove |26 and will be retained therein because of the resilient engagement of the lower surface of the flange |30 with the lower surface of the groove, and the engagement of the hump |32 with the upper surface of the groove. rlhe marker |28 is, of course, provided with a large opening |34, which may readily be placed over one of the holes 32, in a position such that the marker will not be visible from the opposite side of the board.

The game board shown in Figs. 1l to 14 may be utilized in the same manner as the board shown in Fig. 1. In using this board, the pins may conveniently be retained in the box, and pins of the proper color selected therefrom during the playing of the game. When the game is not in use, the brackets ||0 may, of course, be folded inwardly so as to lie within the box, and the board slid in the rabbets |08 so as to form a cover for the box. When in use, the box, of course, forms a very stable support for the board.

The board shown in Fig. 11 may be used for a large variety of games in addition to those of the type previously described, by the use of various masks, such as shown in Figs. 16, 17 and 2l. For example, an educational game may be played by utilizing charts |36, |38, shown in Figs. 16 and 17, respectively.

These charts are substantially the same size and shape as the board 96 and are adapted to be placed one upon each side of the board, and accurately positioned relative thereto by means of a pin |40 (Fig. 14) passing through holes |42, |44 formed in the corners of the sheets |36, |38, respectively. The charts are held so as to lie closely adjacent the board 96 by the flanges ||8 which form part of the brackets ||0.

The charts |36, |38, shown in the drawings, are illustrated as for the purpose of teaching geography, more particularly the capitals of the various States of the United States of America. Similar sets of charts may. of course, be provided for teaching any other desired branch of knowledge, such as arithmetic, literature, history and other various exact and natural sciences.

The charts will be furnished in sets, each chart being ruled off into squares |46, |41, |48, and |48,

A |50 and |5|, each having a central perforation |52, of slightly larger diameter than the diameter of the holes 32 in the board 96. Each of the charts |36 has questions printed inhalf of the squares, and answers printed in the other half. 'Ihe charts are provided in sets, such as chart |36, designated Chart I-A, and the chart |38, designated "Chart I-B.

When these charts are properly positioned on opposite sides of the board 96, the square containing the answer to a question will lie directly in line with the square on the other chart upon which the question isk printed. For example, a

square |46 contains the question, What is the capital of Georgia?-and the square |49, which will be directly behind the square |46 when the charts |36 and |38 are properly positioned over the board 96, has the answer "Atlanta printed thereon. Similarly, square |50 contains the answer to the question in square |41, and square |5| contains the answer to the question in square |48.

` Having properly positioned a set of charts on the game board, the game is played in the following manner: Each player is provided with any desired equal number of pins. For example, each player may be provided with twenty pins. The play is commenced by one player reading a question from the board. His opponent will examine the squares containing the answers, and insert one of his pins in the aperture 32 in the square in which is printed what he believes to be the correct answer to the given question. The pin is pushed through the board 96 and through the chart on the opposite side. If the pin is projected into the square which contained the question which was asked, the player who asked the question pushes the pin back to his opponent. If the pin is inserted in the wrong hole, the player who asked the question withdraws the pin and retains it. The game is, of course, won by the player who first succeeds in obtaining the twenty pins from his opponent.

If desired, the box may be mounted on a swivel at its center, so that it and the board may be readily turned through an angle of 180 and thus permit the players to verify the correctness of their respective decisions ,as to which player is to receive the pin. The charts may have the questions and answers printed on both sides thereof, so as to increase the repertoire. By providing a dozen or so of sets of charts, a large range ofl useful information may be represented, and the player of the game will thus acquire a wide knowledge of useful facts.

The board 96 may also be utilized in playing a large number of other games similar to that played by means of the charts shown in Figs. 16 and 17.

' It may also be utilized in playing other games, of

the type in which a counter is moved over designated spaces, such as the game of checkers; games of the type in which a counter travels along a designated graduated path, in accordance with the throw of dice, or the indications of a spinner having a number scale; or games of the peg and board type, in which pegs are inserted in holes formed in a board, either to mark the score or in actual playing of the game, such as cribbage, or a game in which the players alternately insert a peg in any desired hole, the object of cach player being to place his pin so as to have five pins in a horizontal, vertical, or diagonal line. In most of these games, it will be found desirable to place a mask over the board 96. For example, in Fig. 21, I have illustrated a mask |54 placed 2,100,421 v v K n over the board 96, and held in registry therewith by a plurality of pins |56 (one .only shown, in Fig. 21) inserted in alignment holes |58 formed in the-mask. The mask |54 is illustrated for the playing of the game of checkers, and is accordingly marked with checkerboard squares, each square having a perforation slightly larger than the hole 32 of the board 96 lying beneath it. By providing a plurality of masks with a given board, the board may readily be utilized for playing a very large number of different games. A single, inexpensive mask formed of a sheet of stiff paper may be marked so as to make it possible to utilize it in playing several different games. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that there are a large number of different possible forms of masks which could be provided for use in playing games at present known.

In Fig. 18, I have shown a device particularly adapted for playing games of the salvo type, which comprises three plates |60, |62 and |64, which are pivotally joined at their upper edges by means of hinges |66, and the lower edges of which may be clamped together by means of a pair of cam surfaced clamps 68, which are rotatably secured to the lugs |10 formed on the plate |64, and the cam surfaces of which are adapted to engage the lower edge of the plate |60 to clamp the lower edges of the three plates rmly together by manual rotation of the cam surfaced clamp |68.

Each of the plates has a pair of large square openings |12, |14, formed therein, and two sets of openings |16, which may be used for scoring purposes. 'I'he central plate |62 is provided with a pair of fixed dowel pins |18, which project sulficiently from the surface thereof to form supports for a pair of sheets |80. The sheets |80 each have printed thereon two fields of one hundred squares each, which, when the sheet is properly positioned between the plates, will lie respectively behind the openings |12 and |14. The sheet also has printed thereon markings to designate squares observable through the scoring openings |16. The opposed surfaces of the plates |60, |62 and |64, are preferably serrated, or otherwise roughened, or may have a thin coating of .rubber applied thereto so as to firmly engage and plates |60 and |64 are preferably sprung slightly,

as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 19, soy that when the plates are drawn tightly together by means of the clamp |68, the plates will rmly clamp the paper along the entire edge of the latter.

With this game are provided a plurality of piercing pins |82 (Fig. 20), groups of. which, as in the embodiment of Fig. 1, are colored distinctively. The game is played in the following manner: Each player takes a blank form sheet |84 and positions his various ships thereon by marking the chart in any suitable manner, as by drawing small squares |86 Within the squares printed on the sheet. After each of the players has thus located his ships, the sheets |84 are inserted between the plates |60 and |62, and |64 and 62, respectively, and the frame plates |60, |62 and |64 rmly forced together by means of the clamp |68. Thereafter, each player selects seven pins |82, of a common color, and the players alternately lire their salvos, as above described, by piercing both sheets |84 With the pointed pins |82, until one of the players ships has been "sunk. Hits are, of course, registered in the scoring openings |16, as will be readily understood.

The apparatus shown in Figs. 18 and 19 is not illustrated as being provided with means for supporting the plates. Any suitable means are, of course, provided so that the board may be supported in a vertical plane between the two players. If. desired, the apparatus of Figs. 18 and 19 may be constructed so that it is unnecessary to use printed forms. This may be done by providing a grille with a hundred squares, or other suitably shaped openings, in place of each of the large openings |12, and separating the scoring openings |16 with suitable division means. The central plate |62 is provided to separate the sheets |84 so that the markings on a players sheets |84 will not be visible to his opponent by transmitted light. If a sufficiently opaque paper is used, a single sheet may be clamped between two plates, such as |60 and |64, and thus the central plate |62 may be omitted.

In the embodiments shown in Figs. l to 14, the field A on each side of the boards maybe colored black, so as to form a blackboard upon which the location of the ships may be marked by means of chalk. This marking will, of course, be in lieu of the use of the markers 46, 68, 86, 88, and |28.

Various other modifications may be made in the construction of the game and its various parts, and in the materials of which the various parts are made, without departing from the salient features of. my invention. It will therefore be understood that while I have shown but a few embodiments of my invention, it may be embodied in a large variety of different forms, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

I claim:

l. In combination, a box, a game board in the form of a cover for said box, and a pair of supports for said cover pivoted on said box and arranged to be folded Within the latter.

2. In combination, a. game board having a plurality of spaced holes therein, pins adapted to be inserted in said holes, a mask shaped to cover certain of. the holes in said board and having perforationsV registerable with others of the holes in said board, and means detachably to hold said mask in a predetermined position on vsaid board,

3. In combination, a game board having a plurality of spaced holes extending therethrough, a pair of charts having perforations spaced to be registrable with holes in said board, means for holding said charts one on each side of said board with the perforations of the former in registry with the holes of the latter, indicia on said charts adjacent each of the perforations thereof, the indicia on one chart bearing a predetermined relationship to the indicia on the other chart, and a plurality of pins insertable in said holes so as to be visible from both sides of said board.

4. In combination, a game board having a plurality of perforations, means to support said board in a vertical position, a plurality of indicia positioned adjacent the perforations in said board on both sides thereof, the indicia on one side bearing a predetermined relationship to the indicia on the opposite side thereof, and pins insertable in said holes to designate selected indicia.

5. In combination, a metal sheet having a plurality of perforations formed therein, an annular flange surrounding each of said perforations, means for supporting said sheet in a vertical position between two opposing players, markers arranged to designate selected ones of said perforations arranged to be supported by said flanges so as to be visible from one side only of said sheet, and a plurality of pins insertable in said perforations.

6. In a game apparatus, the combination of a perforated board, means to support said board in a vertical position, apertured means to indicate selected perforations of said board, said apertured means being visible from one side only of said board, and a plurality of groups of distinguishable pins insertable in said board to designate selected perforations thereof.

7. A marker adapted to be detachably secured to a game board having a groove in the surface thereof, comprising a unitary piece of resilient sheet material thinner than the groove in the board with which it is to be used, said marker having a portion corrugated and insertable in the groove of the board.

8. In combination, a board having a plurality of holes formed therein in rows and files equidistantly spaced and having a plurality of grooves one adjacent each row of holes, a plurality of perforated markers each having a flange engageable in one of said grooves, the perforations in said markers being of greater diameter than the holes in said board, and a plurality of groups of pins insertable in the holes in said board from either side of the latter, each pin of a group having a characteristic by which it may be distinguished from pins of the other groups, and means for supporting said board in a vertical plane whereby players on opposite sides thereof may readily attach said markers and insert said pins.

9. In game apparatus an apertured board adapted to be vertically positioned between opposing players so that one side only thereof is visible to each of the players, and providing a plurality of playing fields complementarily disposed on opposite faces of said board, and a plurality of pins insertable in the apertures so that each will have a portion visible from both sides of the board, said playing fields comprising al pluralityof pairs of fields, each of said fields bearing indicia individual to the apertures in the board, and the indicia uponv one of the fields being unlike the indicia upon the other of said pair of fields, one of said fields being disposed on one side of said board and the other of said fields being disposed on the other side of said board, with the indicia of one field bearing a predetermined relation to the indicia upon its opposed field.

10. In a game of the character described, a playing board having a playing surface divided into two corresponding playing areas, said areas having corresponding series of openings in the playing surface, apertured target members, means for holding said target members on one of said playing areas with the apertures thereof in register with any selected ones of said openings respectively, and playing pieces adapted for insertion through said aperture and into said openings to indicate plays made.

11. A game board adapted to be positioned upright between two players and provided with two groups of perforations, enclosure means for designating a series of the perforations in one of said groups on each face of the board and arbitrarily positioned by each player for providing an unseen target for the opponent, and a plurality of pins adapted to be inserted through the perforations from opposite sides of the board in the playright between two players and'provided with a. plurality of perforations, enclosure means on each face of the board and arbitrarily positioned by the respective players to designate a series of perforations serving as an unseen target for the opponent and a plurality of pins adapted to be inserted through the perforations from opposite sides of the board in the playing of the game.

13. A game board adapted to be positioned upright between two players and provided with two groups of perforations, enclosure means for designating a series of the perforations in one of groups of perforations, enclosure means for designating a series of the perforations in one of said groups on each face of the board and arbitrarily positioned by each player for providing an unseen targe for the opponent, and a plurality of pins dierentiated in groups and adapted to be inserted through the perforations from opposite sides of the board in the playing of the game.

15. In a game of the character described, a playing board having a playing surface divided into two similar playing areas, said areas having corresponding series of pin receptacles in the playing surface, separable target members, means for supporting same on said board to indicate selected receptacles thereof and to be visible to only one of a pair of players facing each other with the board located between them, and playing I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2579454 *Dec 14, 1949Dec 25, 1951Achen Robert KPerforated board and push pin for a salvo game
US2626711 *Dec 6, 1948Jan 27, 1953SaulAdjustable peg rack
US2745558 *Dec 23, 1952May 15, 1956Greenspan Stephen HSupports for archery equipment
US2793558 *Nov 13, 1953May 28, 1957Block Herman HMusical game
US3081088 *Jul 3, 1959Mar 12, 1963Eric C KastGame apparatus
US3169769 *Feb 11, 1952Feb 16, 1965Cornish DonMulti-dimensional gameboard with chance devices
US3209919 *May 18, 1964Oct 5, 1965Hoogstoel Leon EDisplays
US3427028 *Mar 1, 1966Feb 11, 1969Thomas C AbrahamsenWord building game apparatus with two-sided playing board
US3483647 *Apr 19, 1968Dec 16, 1969Shaw & Slavsky IncSignboard for peg letters
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US3655191 *Jun 1, 1970Apr 11, 1972Reuben Klamer D B A Reuben KlaGame with free fall playing pieces and selectively placed support pegs
US3672073 *Sep 11, 1970Jun 27, 1972Pilorusso FelixTeaching apparatus
US3905602 *Jun 24, 1974Sep 16, 1975Madonna Jr John MBoard game apparatus
US3970312 *Jul 14, 1975Jul 20, 1976Senn Herall GEducational game
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/265, 273/282.1, 235/90, 248/220.31, 40/620, D21/337
International ClassificationA63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00406, A63F3/00574
European ClassificationA63F3/00B9