Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2101924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1937
Filing dateJul 22, 1935
Priority dateJul 22, 1935
Publication numberUS 2101924 A, US 2101924A, US-A-2101924, US2101924 A, US2101924A
InventorsTurnquist Edward
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Riveting machine
US 2101924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1937: E. TURNVQUIST 2,101,924

RIVETING MACHINE Filed July 22, 1935 6 $heets-Sheet 1 :69 ATTORNEY INVENTORI P Dec. 14, 1937. E. TURNQUIST 2,101,924

RIVE-TING MACHINE Filed July 22, 1955 e Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEi- INVENI'OR Dec.- 14, 1937. E. TURNQUIST RIVETING MACHINE Filed July 22, 1935 6 sheets-sh et 5 r NQ u gig INVENTOR .fW-ZM M BY 524 ATTORNEYA- M% WQ A Dec. 14, 19.37; E. TURNQUIST 2,101,924

RIVETING MACHINE INVENTOR ATTORN Dec. 1 4, 1937. E. TURNQUIST 2,101,924

RIVETING MACHINE Filed July 22, 1935 6 Sh ets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Am/z F 1 BY AT'roRlg l zi uNir-Eo STATES, PATENT OFFICE RIVETING MACHINE Edward Turnqnist, Anderson, Ind., assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, corporation of Delaware Mich., a

g Application July 22, 1935, Serial No. 32,515

Claims. (CI. 78-48) This invention-relates to riveting machines and more particularly vto an automatic riveting machine.'

It is an object of the present invention to pro- ;vide for delivery of an orderly disposed rivet from a supply to a place adjacent its application. e

It is another object of the present invention to place a delivered rivet without fail in the receiving apertures of properly located, overlapping work portions.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a machine which rapidly and automatically accomplishes the aforementioned objects in addition to the actual heading of a placed rivet shank upon a simple manipulation of a machine element by an operator.

Further objectsand advantages of the presentinvention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein a preferred embodiment of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawingsi Fig. 1 is a fragmentary front elevation of a riveting machine embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side elevationof the machine as viewed in the direction of arrow 2 in Fig. 1

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of a rivet holding hopper and its mounting on the machine. This section is taken on the lines 3-3 of .Figs. 1

. and 4. 35 Fig. 4 is a fragmentary section taken substantially on the line 44 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary section taken substantially on the line 55 of Fig. 4. i

Fig. 6 is a section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4.

Fig. '7 is a fragmentary section taken substantial'y on the line 'I--'! of Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary view of part of Fig. 1.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 8, showing certain elements of the machine in a Y difierent position of operation, however. Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 9.

showing certain machine elements in still another position of operation. t

F'g. 11 is a section taken on the line ll-ll of Fig.8. r

i Fig.; 12 is an enlarged; fragmentary view of part-of Fig'. 2, part'thereof being shown in section which is taken substanti l2-l2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 13 is a front elevation of part of Fig. 12 as viewed in the direction-of arrow l3 of Fig. 12. Fig. 14 is a section taken substantially on the line ll-ll of Fig. 12.

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary perspective view of certain details of the machine.- l

Figs. 16 to 19 inclusive are sectional views similar to Fig. 12, each showing a different position ally on the line.

of operation of certain elements of the machine,

however.

Fig. 20 is a front elevation of part of Fig. 19

as viewed in the. direction of arrow 20 in Fig. 19. The present machine is adapted to rivet a mounting bracket" to an automobilelamp housis capable of a much more universal application and accordingly may, for instance, be adapted to rivet two or more over-lapping portions of any type of work together. Briefly, the operator of the machine brings the rivet receiving holes of over-lapping work portions into registry with a yielding pilot pin of the machine. Thereafter the operator starts the machine for one cycle of operation by a simple manipulation of a machine element, resulting in delivery of r a rivet from a store to a place adjacent its application, setting of the delivered rivet in the receiving holes of the over-lapping work portions and subsequent heading of the inserted rivet shank. These steps ing, but it is to be understood that this machine constitute one complete cycle of operation of the J machine. I V

The present machine incorporates various devices which are mounted on a conventional machine frame 30, having a crankshaft 32 and a reciprocatory ram 34 connected therewith. Drivingly connectable any conventional one revolution clutch (not shown) is a. flywheel 36 which is driven by a pinion (not shown) of an electric motor 38, mounted on a platform 40 of the machine frame 30. Any suitable friction brake 42 is permanently applied to the crankshaft 32 and may be adjusted by means of a clamping spindle 44. This brake prevents over-travel of the crankshaftafter disengagement 'of the mentioned one revolution clutch which may be conveniently actuated by a foot pedal through a suitable corinecting linkage (neither shown).

The various devices carried by the punch press frame 30 may be termed as follows: a workholder A, a rivet delivering device B and a rivet setting and heading device C.

. Workholder A Referring particularly to Figs. 2 and 12, a bracket 50 is suitably mounted on the machine frame 30 and is provided with a recess 52 wherein a block 54 is locked by means of a set screw 55. This block is provided with a recess 58 in which a work support 80 is slidable. A plurality of compression springs 62 urges said work support into the position shown in Fig. 12 in which a retainer plate 64 on block 54 engages a flange 55 of said work support. Received in a recess 58 of block 54 and projecting into the work support 50 with a slide fit is a header 10 which also rests on a steel support 12 in block 54. Slidable in this header 10 is a pilot pin 15 which is normally urged with its frustro-conical surface 18 into engagement with a correspondingly shaped surface 80 of the header 10 by a compression spring 82. In the present instance two over-lapping work portions 84 to be riveted together are shown in the drawings. In Fig. 12, these work portions 84 are shown resting on the work support 50 with the pilot pin 15 projecting through the rivet receiving holes 86 of these over-lapping work portions. In this manner over-lapping work portions are properly located in the machine.

Rivet delivering device B Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 to '7 inclusive, a frame 90 is mounted in any suitable manner on the machine frame 30 and provides a journal bearing 92 for a shaft 94 on which a hopper 96 is mounted. This hopper is generally cup-shaped and provided at its open end with a plurality of equi-angularly spaced, radial slots 98 which are just wide enough to let the-shank I of a rivet I02 pass therethru. The open end of the hopper is so spaced from the plane wall I04 of frame 90 that a rivet head may comfortably pass therebetween. The hopper receives a supply of rivets, indicated by the dot-and-dash line in Fig. 4, through a suitable chute I and a corresponding opening I08 in the frame 90. A circular rib IIO of frame 90 extends in close proximity to well over half the circumference II2 of the hopper 95, and prevents the discharge from the hopper of rivets the headsand shanks of which are situated in the space between the frame wall I04 and the open end of the hopper and in the radial slots 98 of the latter, respectively, as best shown in Fig. 4. Another circular rib II4 of frame 90 extends concentrically of the hopper from the frame opening I 08 to a rivet chute H5, but this rib H4 is considerably spaced from the hopper circumference I I2. Mounted on top of rib H4 is an arcuate plate II8 the surface I20 of whichis concentric of the hopper circumference I I2 and is so spaced therefrom as to afford comfortable clearance for a rivet shank I00 but not for the rivet head. Hopper 95 is intermittently Y rotated clockwise as viewed in Fig. 4 in a manner to be describedlater, whereby the rivets'therein are agitated and some of them will assume a position in which their shanks I00 enter some of the hopper slots 98. As best shown in Figs. 3 and 5, the inner wall of the open hopper-end is curved outwardly so that the heads on those ri get" shanks which project into hopper slots 98 may gravitate into the circular track I 22 which is formed by the arcuate plate II 8, the hopper periphery H2 and the frame wall I04 as best shown in Figs. 4 and 5. This track I22 is in direct communication at I 24 with the rivet chute I I5, a cross section of which is shown in Fig. 6.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, ram 34 is provided with a lug I30 through which extends a rod I32, linked at I34 to an arm I35, journaled on an extension I38 of a ratchet disc I40 which is mounted on the hopper shaft 94. This arm I35 carries a pawl I42 which is normally urgedinto engagement with the ratchet teeth I44. Interposed .between the ram lug I30 and a collar I45 on rod I32 is a spring I48 which normally urges another collar I50 of rod I32 into engagement with said ram lug. Upon a downward stroke of the ram 34, rod I32 with its collars naturally follows the ram, resulting in idle riding of pawl I42 over some of the ratchet teeth I44 Upon the return stroke of the ram, spring I48 will be at first compressed and eventually forces rod I32 back into the position shown in Fig. 1, resulting in agitation of the hopper by means of the cooperating pawl I42 and ratchet teeth I44.

Consequently, upon a return strokeof the ram' 34, spring I 48 is at first sufficiently compressed to overcome the considerable static friction in the hopper bearing so that at the start of the hopper the considerable, stored energy in said spring is almost suddenly released and accelerates the hopper to such an extent that the latter soon rotates faster than the pawl and comes to rest again considerably after the pawl stops. From all the foregoing it can be understood that the hopper is given enough impetus to accelerate the hopper sufficiently to considerably agitate the rivets therein, some of which will pass through the hopper slots 98 and into the arcuate track I22 and finally into the chute II5 as best illustrated in Fig. 4. Other rivets, though entering the hopper slots 98, cannot leave the same due to the adjacent arcuate rib IIO. However, these latter rivets may finally descend into the arcuate track I22 on a subsequent agitation of the hopper as can be readily understood. In case a rivet shank should become jammed in a hopper slot as shown in Fig. 7, there is provideda member I50 which projects into the frame opening I08 and is provided with a camming surface I52 in close proximity to the hopper periphery II2. This surface I52 is adapted to engage the head of the jammed rivet and cam the same out of its slot, whereupon the released rivet will drop back into the hopper.

As bestshown in Fig. 2, the rivet chute H5 terminates adjacent the rivet setting and heading device 0. Alongside the rivet chute a mechanism is provided which is adapted to release one rivet at a time into the remaining chute. This mechanism will now be described with particular reference to Figs. 8 to 11 inclusive. Normally part ofthe chute I I5 and communicating arcuate track I22 is filled with rivets'the shanks of which extend in the same direction as follows from the foregoing description. Normally the shoulder I10 .having a substantially Z-shaped slot I54 through which extends a pivot I85, also secured to bracket I18. Both levers I12, I82 are connected at I88 with a link I90 which is pivotally mounted at I92 on bracket I18. One of the pivots I88 is longer and extends into a slot I94 of an arm I85 which is pivotally mounted at I88 to bracket I18 I means of bolts 2I2. Holder 208 is retained in its guide groove 208 by a retainer plate 2I4 and is provided with a longitudinal bore m, flankedby two diametrically opposite, longitudinal slots 2I8. Received in said bore 2I8 is a compression spring 220, one end of which bears against a pin 222 of holder 208- and the other end of which bears against a pin 224 which is secured to the plates 210, 2I4 and extends through theholder slots 2I8. Aset screw 228 is adJustably secured to holder 208 and limits its- 'movem nt to the left as shown in Fig. 8. buring a do ward stroke of the ram from the uppermost position shown in Fig. 8, roller 204 engages the surface 228 of cam 200 and is thereby forced to the right against the compression of spring 220, since the cam carrying arm I88 is normally urged into engagement with another. adjustable set screw 28! in bracket I18 by means of a tension spring 282 and consequently'stopped against further counterclockwise rotation as viewed in Fig. 8. Roller 204 and holder 208' are even further moved toward the right as viewed in Fig. 8 when the forme rides over surface- 234 of cam 200. Consec \ently the cam carryinglever I98 remains stationary during the entire work stroke of ram 84 and roller 204. is forced to dodge said cam. Immediately-after roller 204 clears cam 200 during the work stroke of the ram, holder 208 is forced by the spring 220 to return into the position shown in Fig. 8. During the return stroke of the ram, roller 204 will engage the cam surface 288, causing arm I98 to rock clockwise as viewed in Fig. 8. Such rocking of arm I98 continues while the roller 204 cooperates with the cam surface 238 as follows from Fig. 9 inwhichj lever I12 is shown entirely'retracted from the chute passage H1 and lever I82 is in the path of downward movement 'of the rivet shanks projecting from said passage II1. Immediately after roller 204 clears cam 200 during further upward movement of the ram 34 from the position shown in Fig. 9, spring 232 forces the levers I12, I 82 and arm I98 into the position of Fig. 8 as can be readily understood. While arm I98. is rocked clockwise from the'position shown in Fig. 8 to that shown in Fig. 9, in the just' explained manner, the shank supporting shoulder I10 of lever I12v retracts from the chute passage II1 into. the position shown in Fig. 9 and lever I82 simultaneously approaches said chute passage until a shoulder 240 thereof is in the path of descent of the rivet shanks in the chute as shown in Fig. 9. Both levers I12, I82 are so coordinated that lever I82 is already in the path of descent of the lowermost rivet in the chute when lever I12 is about to release said rivet,

which then will descend upon the obstructing shoulder 240 of lever .I82. Fig. 10 discloses the relative position of both levers I12, I82 just prior to the release of the lowermostrivet in the chute by lever 112 and slight additional movement of lever I82 into obstructing position. Therefore, during a complete clockwise rocking of arm I98 from the position shown in Fig. 8 tothat shown in Fig. 9, the entire row of rivets in the chute will first descend upon shoulder 240 of lever rivet is below the shoulder I18 of lever I12. me. z-shaped slot I84 of lever I82 results in slight upward movement sure that the shoulder I10 of lever I12, when I82 in which position the shank of the lowermost of the shoulder 240 thereof while approaching the chute passage I" to asagain returning from the position shownin Fig 9 to that shown in Fig.

der m of the half-withdrawn lever m. or.

8, will actually move into the path-of descent of shank I00 a of the consec course, as soon as roller 204 clears cam 200 dur- I ing the return stroke of the rain; the levers I12,"

I82 return immediately from the position shown in Fig. 9 to that shown in Fig.8, whereupon the lowermost rivet, which is then'resting on shoulder 240 of lever I82 is released from lever I82-and free to pass through the remaining chute. Rivet setting and heading device 0 Y Referring more particularly to Figs. 12 to 20 1 inclusive, thebracket 80 provides guideways 250 for a slide cured to slide 252 is a lug 256 which is adapted to cooperate with adiustable set screws 258 which 252 which is preferably provided with I several cavities 254 to reduce its weight. Se-' connection. Pivotally'connected-at 280 with slide 252 are four links 282 which are also pivotally connected at 284 with the two identical halves 288 of a rivet setting head 288. Two of these pivots 280 carry depending arms 210 to which a tension spring 212 is applied, normally urging the two halues 288 into the closed position shown in Fig.

13. Since this head 288 has been first formed and cylindrically bored as an integral piece and subsequently split in halves by sawing for instance, and since the cylindrical shape of .comple mentary bores in both halves 288 has to be main-u tained for reasons which will appear obvious later, cam sleeves 214 are secured to tliose pivots 280 which carry the depending arms 210. As

best shown n Figs. 13 and 15, these sleeves 214 are provide with camming surfaces 218 which engage the adjacent surfaces and thus prevent approach between the halves 288 beyond that shown in Fig. 13. The head 288 is provided with a bore pered recess 284. Bore 282 is of such diameter that a rive t head may readily slide therein and the tapered recess 284 terminates in a cylindrical 218 of slide 252.

280 which merges hits a -slightly smaller bore 282, terminating in a tamouth 288 which is of such diameter that a' rivet I shank may slidably fit therein. As best shown I in Fig. 13, the head 288 is provided with a wide gate 288 which merges into a narrow gate 290. The bottom surface 292 -of gate 288 is inclined and in the uppermost position of the head 288 as I I8 that a'rivet from the chute will pass-through the'gates 288, 290 and finally descend through the bores 280, 282 into the full line position shown in Fig. 12. In this manner a relea d rivet passes-through the lower part of the ri et' chute I I8.and is received by the head 268; The upper setscrew 258 in Fig. 12 is so adjusted that in the explained uppermost position of the head,

shown in Fig. 12 is so aligned with the rivet chute c the bottom surface 292 of gate 288 is flush with the chute surface 294 on which the head of a rivet slides while descending inthe chute.

As best shown in Fig. 12, a sleeve 3001s secured to the slide 252. This sleeve slidably receives a' rod 382 having an enlarged head 384 against which bears one end of a-compression spring 386 the other end of which-bears against the sleeve 388. Rod 382 is connected at 388 to the ram 34.

Secured in any suitable manner to the ram 34 is a punch 3l8 which in the uppermost position of ram 34 and slide 252, i. e. in inoperative position of the machine, assumes the position shown in'Fig. 1.2 in which there is enough clearance between said punch and the entrance gate 288 of the head 268 to permit free passage of a released rivet therein. Immediately after ram 34 starts on a work stroke, the slide 252 with the parts carried thereby starts to descend by gravity since the maximum compression of spring 386 in the compressed state shown in Fig. 12 is.

just sufficient securely to hold slide 252 in engagement with the upper set screw 258. The

punch 3 l 8 catches the rivet in the slower descending head 268 substantially in the position of slide 252 as shown in Fig. 16. Since the gravity of the slide 252 assists in its descent, it follows that thereafter punch 3| 8 and head 268 descend si- 'rnultaneously until they arrive in the position shown in Fig. 17 in which slide 252 is stopped by the lower set screw 258. However, just before the head 268 arrives in its lowermost position, the rivet therein registerswith the earlier mentioned pilot pin 16 which is provided with a ta-' pered tip 3|2, projecting into a'correspondingly shaped recess of the rivet shank. Upon continued descent of punch 3"! from the position shown in Fig. 17 successively into the positions shown in Figs. 18'and 19, punch 318 which engages the rivet head with its concave sur ace 3l6 forces said rivet into the receiving holes 86 of the overlapping work portions 84 against the tendency of the compression spring 82 normally to urge the pilot pin 16 into the position shown in Fig. 12 or 17. It is obvious from Fig. 20 that the forced rivet spreads the two halves of head 266 apart against the tension of spring 212. When the rivet head engages the overlapping work portions 84 as shown in Fig. 18, the further descending punch 3l8 forces the work support 68 from the position shown in Fig. 18 to that shown in Fig. 19 against the compression of the springs 62. During such combined movement of therivet,

the work support and the punch, therivet shank is headed over by the inwardly tapered or concave surface 3l8 of the header 18. Immediately after the ram 34 starts on its return stroke, work support 68 is returned into the position shown in Fig. 18 by the compression springs 328. During the return stroke 01' the ram, the spring 386 engages sleeve 388 and the same is gradually compressed until the compression thereof overcomes the weight of the slide 252 and the parts carried thereby, whereupon said slide follows the ram into the uppermost position shown in Fig. .12 in-which the rivet chute is again in alignment with the entrance gate 268 of the head 268 at the time another rivet is released from the chute. At the very start of the ram '34 on its return stroke, the punch 3|8 withdraws from the spread halves of head 268 and the same are returned into the position shown in Fig. 13 before spring 386 reengages sleeve 388.

. ceiving holes of overlapping work-portions into registry with the pilot pin 16, the operator starts the machine for one complete cycle of operation by causing engagement of the earlier mentioned one revolution clutch (not shown). During the following workstroke of the ram 34, the rivet 268. This completes one cycle of operation of the machine. Thereafter, the operator places new work to be riveted in the machine in the earlier explained manner and starts the machine for a new cycle of operation.

While the embodiment of the present invention as hereindisclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

I claim:

1. In a riveting machine, the combination of a rivet chute; a device for permitting passage of the foremost rivet in the chute only; means includinga pivotally mounted leverfor actuating said device upon rocking said lever into opposite end positions; a cam on the lever, said cam having opposite faces; a stop for the lever in one endadjustable stop on the roller to cooperate with said shoulder; and a spring urging the roller withv its stop into engagement with said shoulder, one face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the lever into engagement with its stop and to move the roller away from the shoulder during movement of the element in one direction, and the other face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the roller with its adjustable stop against the shoulder and to rock the lever away from its stop during movement of the element in the opposite direction.

2. In a riveting machine, the combination of a rivet chute; two members movable transversely of the chute and having portions adapted to obstruct the advance of rivets in the chute and being so spaced from each other as to admit only one rivet therebetween; means including a pivotally mounted lever for simultaneously moving one member into obstructing position and withdrawing the other member from obstructing position and vice versa upon rocking said lever into opposite end positions; a cam on the lever, said cam having opposite faces; a stop for the lever in one end position; means yieldingly urging the lever against said stop; a reciprocable element having a shoulder; a cam roller slidable on said element transversely of its direction of reciprocation; an adjustable stop on the roller to cooperate with said shoulder; and a spring urging the roller with its stop into engagement with said shoulder, one face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the lever into engagement with its stop and to move the roller away from the shoulder during movement of the element in one direction, and the other face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the roller with its adjustable stop against the shoulder and to rock the lever away from its' stop during movement of the element in the opposite direction. w

3. In a riveting machine, the combination of a rivet chute; a device for permitting passage of the foremost rivet in the chute only; mechanism receiving a rivet from the chute and holding said rivet in alignment with the registering apertures of work portions to be joined; a reciprocable ram for forcing a rivet from the-mechanism and into said apertures, said ram having a shoulder; means including a pivotally mounted lever for actuating the device upon rocking said lever into opposite end positions; a. cam on the'lever, said cam having opposite faces; a stop for the lever in one end position; means yieldingly urging the lever against said stop; a cam roller slidable on the ram transversely of its direction of reciprocation; an adjustable stop on the roller to cooperate with said shoulder; and a spring urging the roller with its stop into' engagement with said shoulder, one face of the cam cooperating with the roller toforce the lever into engagement with its stop'and to move the roller away from the shoulder during movement of the ram in onedirection, and the other face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the roller with its adjustable stop against the shoulder and to rock the lever away from its stop during movement of the 11am in the opposite direction.

4. In a riveting machine, the combination of a rivet chute; two members movable transversely of the chute and having portions adapted to obstruct the advance of rivets in the chute and being so spaced from each otheras to admit only one rivet therebetween; means including a pivotally mounted lever for simultaneously moving one member into obstructing position and withdraw: ing the other member from obstructing position and vice versa upon rocking said lever into opposite end positions; mechanism receiving a rivet from the chute and ment with the registering apertures of work portions to be joined; a reciprocable ram for forcing a rivet from the mechanism and into said apertures, said ram having a shoulder; a. cam on the lever, said cam having opposite faces; a stop for the lever in one end position; means yieldingly urging the lever against said stop; a cam roller slidable on the ram transversely of its direction of reciprocation; an adjustable stop on the roller to cooperate with said shoulder; and a spring urging the roller with its stop into engagement with said shoulder, one face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the lever'into engagement with its stop and to move the roller away from the shoulder during movement of the ram in one direction, and the other face of the cam cooperating with the roller to force the roller with its adjustable stop against the shoulder and to rock the lever away from its stop during movement of the ram-in the opposite direction.

5. In a machine for heading rivet shanks having a conical recess in their bottoms, the combination of a support for work to be riveted; a yielding pin normally projecting through the rivet receiving aperture of the work, said pin having a conical tip adapted to register with the recess of a rivet shrink to be inserted in the work and guide the same through the aperture of the work; a heading tool including the conical pin tip,

said tip being adapted to cause the shank-metal to flow laterally into the head-forming cavity of the tool upon movement of the rivet shank toward the stopped pin; and means stopping the pin in cooperative position with the tool.

EDWARD 'I'URNQUIS'I'.

holding said rivet in align-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435652 *Jun 11, 1943Feb 10, 1948Koehler Arthur FRiveting machine
US2547551 *Dec 31, 1947Apr 3, 1951Remington Arms Co IncArticle feed device
US2747268 *Apr 18, 1951May 29, 1956John G BaumgartnerMethod and apparatus for cutting the head from an elongated member and moving the member to a predetermined position
US3042183 *Apr 3, 1959Jul 3, 1962Hartnett Co R WArticle handling apparatus
US3053123 *Sep 16, 1959Sep 11, 1962Rosenthal LeonRiveting machines
US3117690 *Nov 21, 1961Jan 14, 1964Sundstrand CorpArticle applying machine
US3125905 *Sep 28, 1961Mar 24, 1964 Stein
US3168185 *Jul 26, 1962Feb 2, 1965Bader Alfred FrederickFeed apparatus
US3292837 *Mar 19, 1965Dec 20, 1966North And Judd Mfg CompanyStapling machine
US4180195 *Jan 16, 1978Dec 25, 1979The Boeing CompanyRivet delivery and locating apparatus
EP0439798A2 *Dec 20, 1990Aug 7, 1991Deutsche Airbus GmbHApparatus and method for the automatic riveting of metal sheets and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/62, 227/115, 227/51, 221/169
International ClassificationB21J15/10
Cooperative ClassificationB21J15/32, B21J15/10
European ClassificationB21J15/10, B21J15/32