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Publication numberUS2102162 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1937
Filing dateFeb 21, 1936
Priority dateFeb 21, 1936
Publication numberUS 2102162 A, US 2102162A, US-A-2102162, US2102162 A, US2102162A
InventorsAlbert Nierenberg
Original AssigneeAlbert Nierenberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of producing etched surfaced shells and casings
US 2102162 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1937. A. NIERENBERG 2,102,162

METHOD OF PRODUCING ETCHED SURFACED SHELLS AND CASINGS Filed Feb. 21, 1936 INKED SHEET SECOND COATIPIG OF HARD LACQLIER AND BAKED I A INVENTOR. albeft' nierenbeg q UNITED METH STATQE s PATENT orrics OD F PRODUCING ETCHED SUR- FACED SHELLS AND OASINGS Albert Nierenberg, New York, 13X. Y. Application February 21, 1936, Serial No. 65,073

Claims.

This invention relates to improvementsw in methods of producing etched surfaced shells and casings, particularly those in the construction of V which deep drawing of metal sheets is involved.

Up to the present time,

in the manufacture of etched surfaced shells or casings of a construction involving deep drawing, particularly those in which the etched design from an enamel or lacquer stands out in relief background, considerable dimculty has been entailed in producing surface ornamentation of the above type which will be regular in contour and quality and at the same time be unaflected in the deep drawing operation and other steps in their manufacture.

Broadly, it is an object of this invention, in the manufacture of etched surfaced shells or casings, to apply to a metal sheet upon which a surface design has been impressed successively with a protective medium for the design and a soft or flexible enamel or lacquer covering both the impressed design and the background, and after deep drawing of thesheet superimposing a coating of hard enamel orlacquer over the design and background; the impressed design then being developed through scraping or otherwise removing the protective coating and layers of enamel covering the same, unaifected.

Still further, it

the background being is an object of this invention,

in the production of etched surfaced deep drawn shells or casings having a lacquer 'or enamel background, to provide corner areas thereof, so that at the for indentation *at the areas of greatest stress in the deep drawing operation the background may not be cracked, distorted or otherwise affected in contour and condition.

These and other advantages, capabilities and features of the invention will appear from the subioined detailed description of one specific embodiment thereof, illustrated panying drawing, in which Figure l is a plan view of the sheet treated.

in the accomas initially Figure 2 is a perspective view of the sheet as initially treated by inking.

Figure 3 is a. perspective view of the sheet after inking and powdering.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the sheet after etching.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the sheet after the first coating.

- Figure 6 is a perspective view of the sheet as view of the shell as Figure 8 is a perspective view of the shell with the coatings scraped from the unetched sheet portions.

In carrying out my process, I take a flat metal sheet and impress thereon through printing from a flat-bed rotary lithographic press a design, which may be an individual representation or a representation associated with a border, or a series of formations extending substantially across and to a point adjacent the edges of the sheet. 10

Before the ink dries I apply a protective medium for the design in the form of powders GOD! slsting essentially of a mixture of beeswax, rosin,

asphalt and other ingredients in finely powdered through adherence of the same with the wet ink surfaces forming the impression.

I thereafter etch out through the usual acid bath, the portions of the sheet not protected and forming the background to be later described.

I take the heretofore etched sheet and apply a coating of soft or flexible enamel or lacquer which covers not only the etched out portion of the sheet but also the portion thereof having the design upon which the protective medium is disposed, and the coated sheet is then baked. This coating of flexible enamel serves as a protective medium of the design and etched out portions of the sheet, to prevent, respectively, scratching of the etched background and scratching of the design, and disturbing of the protective medium on the design during the succeeding die-pressing and drawing operations. Further, by its nature, the flexible enamel adheres firmly to the etched out background and by its adherence to the protective medium over the design, permits of ready removal of the protective medium from the design.

Next, the sheet is placed in a die-press and the edges thereof deep drawn so as to form a shell or casing of the formation desired, the soft or flexible enamel or lacquer being unafiected by the strains imparted to the metal, particularly at the corners and edges in the deep drawing operation. 1

After drawing a second coating of hard lacquer or enamel is superimposed upon the first coating of soft enamel or lacquer and the sheet or casing then baked.

Thereafter, the portions of the lacquer coatings and the protective medium covering the im- Dressed design are removed from the casing by brushing or scraping, resulting in the production of a design having the color of the metal and disposed in the background of the enamel or lacquer.

The resulting product may be buffed and polished if it is desired that the design may have the same coloration as that of the metal forming the original sheet; however, if deslred, the shell may be subjected to a chrome plating or other metal plating bath and the design and portions of the shell not forming the enameled background affected to provide one of several types of platings or colors- With respect to the formation of the design. I have found that it is advisable, particularly in deep drawing operations, to form the same so that the corners thereof are indented with respect to the horizontal or vertical edges thereof, in order that in the deep drawing operation undue stress imparted to the metal, particularly at the corners. in forming a shell of considerable depth, may not affect the surface design or background.

It is obvious that various changes and modiflcaltions may be made to the details of construction without departing from the general spirit of the invention as set forth hr the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A method of producing deep drawn surface etched shells, or the like, comprising printing a design on a sheet, applying a protective coating to the design, etching out the surfaces not involved in the design, applying aflexible enamel background coating to the surface of, the sheet, including the protected design and the etched out portion thereof, deep drawing the sheet to impart a shell formation thereto, superimposing a coating of hard enamel over that of flexible enamel, and removing the coating and protective material from the protected design.

2. A method of producing deep drawn surface etched shells, or the like, design on a sheet, applying a protective coating to the design, etching out the surfaces not involved in the d applying a flexible enamel background coating to the surface of the sheet.-includcomprising printing a log the protected design and the etched out portion thereof, deep drawing the sheet to impart a shell formation thereto, superimposing a coating of hard enamel over that of flexible enamel, and removing the coating and protective material from the protected design, and thereafter plating or otherwise treating that portion of the shell surface not incorporating the enamel background.

3. In a method of producing deep drawn surface etched shells or the like from a sheet incoretched casings, comprising impressing a design on a metal sheet, applying a protective coating to the portion of the sheet carrying the impressed design, etching out the unimpressed portions of the sheet, applying a flexible enamel over the im- Dressed design and the etched out portion of the sheet, deep drawing the sheet in a die to form a shell, superimposing a hard enamel over the flexible enamel and thereafter scraping theenamel and the protective coating from the impressed design.

5. A method of producing deep drawn surface etched casings, comprising impressing a design on a flat sheet. the corners of the design being indented away from the edges of the sheet, covering the design with a protective material, etching out the unprotected portion of the sheet, applying a soft enamel over the protected design impression and the etched out portion of the sheet, deep drawing the sheet to form a. casing, superimposing a hard enamel over the soft enamel coating and thereafter scraping the enamel coating and the protective medium from the impressed design.

ALBERT NIERENBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2521648 *Jan 29, 1945Sep 5, 1950Croname IncEtching process
US2635376 *Apr 20, 1950Apr 21, 1953American La France Foamite CorFire extinguisher
US3287192 *Jul 25, 1963Nov 22, 1966Armin PohlenzMethod of producing self-adhesive labels, letters, characters and symbols
US3959527 *Apr 8, 1974May 25, 1976Lee John DroegeFlat costume jewelry and method for the surface treatment thereof
US4253908 *Jul 19, 1979Mar 3, 1981Stephen Daly PaulBy applying a pattern of etch resistant material to a metal sheet, and etching
US4467515 *Feb 4, 1982Aug 28, 1984The Grigoleit CompanyMethod of finishing aluminum sheets
US5120396 *Jun 4, 1991Jun 9, 1992Chen Kuo CDrawing a figure on a sheet of paper, transferring the figure to a film, then to a silk screen, brushing a protective coating onto a plate covered by the silk screen, removing the silk screen and etching
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/424, 29/527.4, 428/467, 427/259, 216/32, 216/52
International ClassificationB44C1/22, C23F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationC23F1/02, B44C1/227
European ClassificationB44C1/22J, C23F1/02