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Publication numberUS2102368 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1937
Filing dateSep 26, 1935
Priority dateSep 26, 1935
Publication numberUS 2102368 A, US 2102368A, US-A-2102368, US2102368 A, US2102368A
InventorsMartel Edgar J
Original AssigneeMartel Edgar J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch-supporting stocking
US 2102368 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1937. E. J. MARTEL 2,102,368

ARCH SUPPORTING STOCKING Filed Sept. 26, 1955 www@ Patented Dec. 14, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE ARCH-SUPPORTING STOCKIG Edgar J. Martel, Laconia, N. H. Application September 26, 1935, Serial No. 42,251

Claims.

This application is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 753,811, filed November 20, 1934. The invention relates to a sock or stocking which is preferably of knitted 5 construction and which has embodied therein a supporting element for the arch of the foot of the wearer.

It is well known that a great many people are subject to troubles with their feet which cause pains in their feet and elsewhere in their bodies. These troubles are frequently due to a tendency on' the 'part of the cuneiform bones of the foot to be depressed by the weight of the person to positions below the positions they normally occupy. As these bones are the keystones of the arch formed by the bones structure of the foot, undue depression of these bones results in what is commonly known as fallen arches. While considerable restoring force is required to push the cuneiform bones back into place when once .the arches have fallen, yet a comparatively small sustaining or supporting force under the arch portions of the feet is often sufllcient to prevent the falling of the arches. The present invention relates to a sock or stocking having means acting to prevent fallen arches rather than to restore the arches after they have fallen.

According to the invention, I provide socks or stockings, the leg portions of which are knitted with inelastic yarn only, so that the pressure against the leg of the wearer is slight, being due only to the tension of the knitted loops in the fabric, whereas the foot of the sock or stocking is made with a substantial area of knitted elastic thread in the sole portion, which may, if desired, extend all of the way around the instep portion of the stocking. By using for such areas a ne elastic thread to be knitted with the inelastic yarn, a stocking is thus provided with a yielding instep portion having a substantial supporting tension on the arch of the wearers foot. Furthermore, the knitted elastic yarn on the sole of the foot forms a resilient cushion between a portion of the'wearerfs foot and the insole of the shoe.

`Since in some cases the straight addition of an elastic yarn to the inelastic yarn may result in a more bulky fabric than is desired, I may reduce the bulk either by knitting the elastic yarn into courses alternating with one or more courses without the elastic yarn, or by knitting the elastic yarn in each course by needles which are spaced by needles which do not take the elastic yarn so that the elastic yarn floats between successive stitches.

(Cl. (i6- 182) For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the disclosure thereof -in the description which follows and on the drawing of which Figures l, 2, 3 and 4 are elevational views of the 6 foot portions of stockings showing reinforced areas of different shapes.

Figures 5 and 6 are diagrams of alternative forms of fabric which may be employed.

The stocking illustrated in Figure 1 is provided with an elastic area I0 which extends. entirely around the instep portion of the stocking and extends on the sole of the stocking from the toe part II to the heel pocket I2.

Figure 2 shows a stocking with an elastic area I5 extending around the foot of the stocking at `the instep portion thereof, this area being more nearly in the shape of an encircling band for the instep of the foot. I

Figure 3 shows a stocking having an elastic area I6 limited to the sole portion of the stocking but extending from the toe cap to the heel cap.

Figure 4 shows an elastic area I1 similar to the area I6 in Figure 3 extending `higher on the sides of the foot.

In carrying out the invention, socks or stockings are preferably made with the leg portions consisting solely of an inelastic yarn of suchmaterial as cotton, rayon or silk. In the foot ofthe sock or stocking, an elastic threadis fed to the needles to be stitched with an inelastic thread, the feedbeing controlled so that the added elastic thread is limited to predetermined areas.

It is evident that elastic areas may be made in various other designs or patterns, having, in common with the designs shown, the function of providing a substantial, resilient, supporting force for the arch of the foot, and a cushion for a portion of the sole of the foot. These areas may be built into the stocking in any desiredmanner, 'and the elastic thread may be employed in the elastic areas instead of the inelastic yarn used for the other portions of the stocking.' or with such yarn as a reinforcing thread. In order not to render the stocking objectionably bulky, a very ne elastic thread may be used, such thread consisting preferably of a fine strand of soft rubber having a double covering of cotton or other ne yarn wound thereon. These elastic threads can be made small enough to be knitted successfully into loops by the needles of conventional knitting machines so that such elastic thread can be fed to the machine like ordinary yarn. The resulting area thus is elastic not only by reason of the 55 formation of loops (which gives a small degree o! elasticity), but also by reason of the stretching power oi' the elastic thread. Although each individual thread exerts a small tension, the elastic area contains a large number of courses of such thread, the combined tension of which is suiiicient to exert a substantial supporting force on the arch of the foot.

If it is desired to reduce the bulkiness still further, the elastic yarn may be knitted in with the inelastic yarn in consecutive courses in the manner shown in Figure 5 or as shown in Figure 6. The fabric shown in Figure 5 may be knitted by feeding the inelastic yarn 20 to all the needles, but elevating every other needle to take the elastic yarn 2i. The elastic yarn is thus stitched by these needles and iioats past the other needles. It is evident that instead of alternate needles, every third, fourth or fifth needle may be raised to take the elastic thread prior to stitching. When the elastic yarn is knitted on a machine into spaced wales of the fabric, the action of the needles and sinkers inevitably produces more or less tension on the elastic yarn as it is being knitted. As a necessary result, the floated portions of the elastic yarn draw together the wales into which the elastic yarn is knitted, thus gathering the fabric and causing it to have a riblike structure when unstressed. Furthermore, the stitches in the several courses which include the elastic yarn need not be in the same wales as shown, but may be staggered.

As indicated in Figure 6, the elastic yarn may be-knitted into alternate courses, this being done by control of the feeding iinger through which the elastic yarn is supplied. It is evident that the courses containing the elastic yarn may be spaced by more than one course of inelastic yarn if desired.

Stockings embodying the invention may be knit on circular machines or 0n flat machines, since in both types of stockings it is common practice to insert substitute or reinforcing yarns in the sole portions of the stockings and extra reinforcingl yarns in the heel and toe portions.`

It is evident that various modifications and together with an inelastic yarn continuously from the heel pocket to the toe pocket thereof, whereby the arch of the foot is given support and a .substantial cushion is provided for the ball of the foot.

2. A knitted sock or stocking having the foot knitted of inelastic yarn and an elastic yarn knitted in with said inelastic yarn after the manner oi a reinforcing yarn over a substantial area of the sole portion suicient to`provide an elastic support for the arch and a resilient cushion for the ball of the wearers foot. a

3. A knitted sock orl stocking having the foot knitted of inelastic yarn and an elastic yarn knitted in with said inelastic yarn in courses spaced by courses which do notcontain elastic yarn over a substantial area of the sole portion suiiicient to provide an elastic supportfor the arch and a resilient cushion for the ball of the wearers foot.

4. A knitted sock or stocking having the foot knitted of inelastic yarn and an elastic yarn knitted in with said inelastic yarn over a substantial area of the sole portion and in a sumcient number of courses to provide an elastic support for the arch and a resilient cushion for the ball of the wearers foot.

5. A knitted sock or stocking having the foot knitted of inelastic yarn and an elastic yarn knitted in with the inelastic yarn in successive courses over a substantial area of the sole portion, the elastic yarn in each course being knitted with the inelastic yarn in stitches which arespaced by groups of at least three stitches Past which the elastic yarn is floated. i

EDGAR J. MARTEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3413824 *Feb 19, 1965Dec 3, 1968Swiss Knitting CompanyMethod for the spot shaping of knit fabrics and resultant fabrics produced thereby
US4149274 *Oct 10, 1978Apr 17, 1979Alba-Waldensian, IncorporatedAnti-slip hosiery article and method
US4213312 *May 1, 1978Jul 22, 1980Alamance Industries, Inc.Panty hose with stretch-cotton panty
US4253317 *Apr 26, 1979Mar 3, 1981Burlington Industries, Inc.Sock construction
US4255949 *Aug 16, 1979Mar 17, 1981Thorneburg James LAthletic socks with integrally knit arch cushion
US4341097 *Jul 21, 1980Jul 27, 1982Kayser-Roth Hosiery, Inc.Hosiery article with a reinforced toe with varying density
US5103656 *Mar 27, 1990Apr 14, 1992Nk Mills, Inc.Split-heel sock
US5708985 *Nov 12, 1996Jan 20, 1998Ogden & Company, Inc.Enhanced frictional engagement sock
US5791163 *Sep 26, 1996Aug 11, 1998Throneburg; James L.Knit foot protector having integral padding and method of knitting same
US6021527 *Aug 31, 1998Feb 8, 2000Fox River Mills, Inc.Anatomically designed sock
US7016867May 21, 2002Mar 21, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7107235Oct 24, 2002Sep 12, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7752775Sep 11, 2006Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 23, 2007Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US7971280 *Feb 8, 2006Jul 5, 2011Okamoto CorporationSocks
US7996924 *May 31, 2007Aug 16, 2011Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel providing enhanced body position feedback
US8209883Jul 8, 2010Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8424116 *Mar 6, 2007Apr 23, 20137933657 Canada, Inc.Sock
US8495765 *Dec 23, 2008Jul 30, 2013Okamoto CorporationSock
US8505120 *Jul 5, 2006Aug 13, 2013X-Technology Swiss GmbhSock
US8516616May 2, 2011Aug 27, 2013Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel providing enhanced body position feedback
US8572766 *Jan 14, 2011Nov 5, 2013Bear In Mind CompanySocks having areas of varying stretchability and methods of manufacturing same
US8663178 *Feb 19, 2008Mar 4, 2014Carlo De LucaReinforced stocking or sock for the prevention and/or treatment of hallux valgus
US8918917 *Aug 2, 2013Dec 30, 2014Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel providing enhanced body position feedback
US9622518Nov 6, 2013Apr 18, 2017Nike, Inc.Articles of apparel providing enhanced body position feedback
US20080022440 *Sep 26, 2007Jan 31, 2008Liberman Barnet LSki sock
US20080295230 *May 31, 2007Dec 4, 2008Nike, Inc.Articles of Apparel Providing Enhanced Body Position Feedback
US20090044313 *Mar 6, 2007Feb 19, 2009Pacific Brands Clothing Pty LtdSock
US20090126081 *Jul 5, 2006May 21, 2009X-Technology Swiss GmbhSock
US20090165190 *Dec 23, 2008Jul 2, 2009Takahiro ArakiSock
US20090223254 *Feb 6, 2009Sep 10, 2009Manabu IshidaSock and process for the production thereof
US20090282607 *Feb 8, 2006Nov 19, 2009Masatoshi KanedaSocks
US20100106110 *Feb 19, 2008Apr 29, 2010Carlo De LucaReinforced stocking or sock for the prevention and/or treatment of hallux valgus
US20110203030 *May 2, 2011Aug 25, 2011Nike, Inc.Articles of Apparel Providing Enhanced Body Position Feedback
US20120180195 *Jan 14, 2011Jul 19, 2012James Troy ShullSocks having areas of varying stretchability and methods of manufacturing same
US20120284902 *Jan 24, 2011Nov 15, 2012Kazuhiko MatsuoFoot wear
USD740014 *Apr 20, 2015Oct 6, 2015Nike, Inc.Sock
DE1059374B *Aug 20, 1955Jun 18, 1959Unbekannte Erben Des VerstorbeStrumpf oder Socken
EP3053472A4 *Aug 7, 2014Jun 14, 2017Mizuno KkShoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/182, D02/994, 66/185
International ClassificationD04B9/00, D04B9/46, D04B1/14, D04B1/22, D04B1/26, D04B1/18
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/26, D04B1/18
European ClassificationD04B1/26, D04B1/18