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Publication numberUS2102704 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1937
Filing dateJun 10, 1935
Priority dateJun 10, 1935
Publication numberUS 2102704 A, US 2102704A, US-A-2102704, US2102704 A, US2102704A
InventorsHein George N
Original AssigneeHein George N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe cartridge
US 2102704 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.21,1937. G NHEiN 2,102,704

' lSYRINGE CARTRIDGE v Filed June 10, 1935 .y T ,r l l I2| m z ,"l T l m"`x` I v I l was IN VEN TOR.

. ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 21, 1937 l George N. Hein, San Francisco, Calif.

Application June 10, 1935, Serial No. 25,791

3 Claims.

'I'his invention relates to a syringe cartridge and more particularly to an improvement in the construction-of a syringe cartridge of the type in which liquids such as medicaments may be pre- -pared in sealed form in a cartridge and an injection needle attached directly to the cartridge by .puncture of a resilient closure member thereof.

Among the objects of the invention are to provide a syringe cartridge having va closure member adapted to seat within the discharge end of a vial body and so constructed as to be self-retaining Within the vial body.

Another object is to provide in a syringe cartridge a 'combined closure member and supportin member for an injection needle.

Another object is to provide an end closure member for a syringe cartridge having means for supporting the base or hub of an injection needle and which provides a resilient flange against whichthe needle hub may seat or which may serve as a washer or bumper when the vial body is used in a metal syringe frame.

A further object is to provide, in a puncturable closure member, means to prevent the closure member from sliding inwardly upon puncture thereof by insertion of a needle cannula therethrough.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, all

of which will be more apparent as this description proceeds, the invention is exemplified in one preferred form in the novel construction and combi.- nation of parts hereinafter described, illustrated in the accompanying drawing, and pointed out in the claims hereto appended, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size and details of construction of the apparatus may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit or sacriiicing any of the advantages of the invention.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal view, partly in section, of a` -syringe cartridge embodying a preferred form of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal view partly in section r of a modified form of the invention.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal View partly in section of another embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal view partly in section illustrating another embodiment of the invention.

Referring to the drawing in which like characters of reference indicate corresponding parts, I indicates generally a tubular vial or cartridge body generally cylindrical in form having an open iilling end II to-receive a plunger I2. After the cartridge is filled the open end II may be closed end of the tube of the closure member.

' by a slidable cork I3 of any suitable type but preferably, as indicated herein, hollowed-out as by a concavity in its side walls as at I4. The opposite end of the vial body which may be termed the discharge end is provided with a discharge opening I5 at which the walls of the vial body are flanged radially inwardly as indicated at I6 providing a shoulder. Before the vial body is filled a discharge closure member generally indicated I'I is `mounted Within the vial body at the discharge end opening so as to close the same and provide a sealing means.v As is obvious from the drawing, the discharge closure member II is inserted fromfthe filling end I I and is pressed into engagement with the inturned flange I6 at the discharge end so that the major part of 'the body of the closure member I'I is within the vial body for tight sealing purposes. This closure member is of resilient material and is tubular, as indicated at I8, except for a wall I9 of the resilient material which normally maintains the tube closed but is puncturable `by one end of an injection needle sharpened at both ends, one end of which may be inserted through the opposite The Wall I9 is recessed from the inner end of the closure member so that when the needle penetrates the wall I9 the point of the needle will lie Within the recess and will not be injured by the depression of the opposite closure member I3 upon manipulation of the plunger I2. 'The tube portion. I8 of the closure member I'II is adapted to receive therein one end of a needle supporting member 20. In Figs. 1, 3, and 4 this needle supporting member 2U is illustrated as a substantially rigid nipple having one end embedded in the resilient body of the closure member and extends therefrom providing a free end having threads thereon to which the hub 2| of the needle may be 'threadedly connected.

In Fig. 2 the tubular portion IB of the closure member is itself threaded as at 22 to receive therein a complementary threaded portion 23 of the needle hub member 2|.

The forming of the vial body radially inwardly at the discharge end opening makes the closure member self-sustained against blowing outward upon operation of the,syringe. Means are also providedv to prevent the closure member from `being pushedv inwardly when the needle ls'inserted. 'In Figs. 1 and 2, said means consists of a radially outward ange 24 which provides a groove into which the inwardly formed wall I6 of the vial body engages so that the flange 24 is disposed exteriorly of the inwardly formed portion of. the' vial body and in this connection serves to prevent the closure from sliding inwardly upon insertion of the needle through thepuncturable wall I9, provides a washer to prevent any leakage arou d the needle hub 2I, provides'a bumper for y the needle hub to prevent fracture of the inwardly turned Wall which is particularly advantageous in glass syringe bodies, and'also provides a resilient washer or bumper when the tubular body or vial is dropped into a metal syringe frame in case it is desired to use it in that form. Also, because of its resilience, it is compressed by the needle hub tightly abutting it, and thereby serves as an expandible friction means or friction lock to pre-A vent the needle and hub from inadvertently becoming loose at its mounting. In Figs. 3 and 4 the hub 2| of the needle seats upon a portion 25 of the closure member which protrudes through the opening I5 and thus serves as a washer and bumper in the same manner as the flanges 24 in Figs. 1 and 2. However, in Figs. 3 and 4 the means to prevent the inward sliding of the closure member is formed in the vial body, in Fig. 3 being indicated as an inwardly formed annular groove 26 through which the closure member will slide by reason of its resilience. 'I'he diameter of the vial body at this groove 28 is preferably greater than the diameter of the opening I5, or in other words the shoulder I6 extends radially inwardly to a greater extent than the inwardly formed groove 26 since the pressure against'the shoulder I6 in the operation of the syringe is greater than the rearward pressure on the closure member for the purpose o1' puncturing the wall I2 with the end of a needle.

In Fig. 4 the means for preventing the rearward movement of the closure member I'I consists of an outwardly formed bead 21 which provides an inwardly opening groove 28 in the inner wall of the vial body. The closure member II is preferably formed with side walls which are con= cave as at 29 which provides an edge 30 at the inner end thereof which readily seats in the groove 28, thus resisting the pushing inwardly of the closure member when the needle perforates the wall I9.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A syringe cartridge including an elongated tubular Vial body having an opening at a filling end for receiving a lplunger and having a discharge end opening, a closure member for closing said filling end an'd .being snugly slldable longitudinally of the vial body, a discharge closure member of resilient material mounted at the discharge end opening of the vial body, said last mentioned closure member being tubular and having a puncturable wall of said resilient material normally closing said tube, said last mentioned closure member having at its outer end portion means for releasable mounting thereto of an injection needle hub in abutting contact with the closure member and in iixed relation against longitudinal pressure within the vial body when the puncturable wall has been punctured by an injection needle, said cartridge including means for maintaining said discharge closure member against sliding longitudinally inwardly of the vial body, and the said discharge closure member being extended beyond the confines of the vial body and providing a resilient irictional grip bumper and sealing washer against which the hub of a needle may abut when mounted to the cartridge.

2. A syringe cartridge including an elongated tubular vial body having an opening at a filling end for receiving a plunger and having a discharge end opening whereat the wall of the said body is flanged radially inwardly, a closure member for closing said filling end, a discharge closure member of resilient material mounted at the discharge end opening of the vial body, said last mentioned closure member being tubular and having an integral puncturable wall of said resilient material intermediately spaced from the ends of the tube and normally closing said tube, said cartridge having at its discharge end portion means adapted for releasable mounting thereto of an injection needle hub in abutting contact with the resilient closure member and in xed relation against longitudinal pressure within the vial body when the puncturable wall has been punctured by an injection needle, the said cartridge including means for resisting the inward movement of said closure member longitudinally of the vial body and the said discharge closure member providing a resilient frictional grip bumper and sealing washer against which the hub of the needle abuts when mounted to the cartridge.

3. A syringe cartridge including an elongated tubular vial body having an opening at a illling end for receiving a plunger and having a discharge end opening whereat the wall of the said body is flanged radially inwardly, a closure member for closing said lling end and being snugly slldable longitudinally of the vial body, a discharge' closure member of resilient material mounted at the discharge end opening of the vialv body, said last mentioned closure member being tubular and having an integral puncturable wall of said resilient material intermediately spaced from the ends of the tube and normally closing said tube, said last mentioned discharge closure puncturedA by an injection needle, the said dis v charge closure member providing a resilient sealing washer and frictional grip bumper against which the hub of the needle may abut when mounted tothe closure member.

GEORGE N. HEIN'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429183 *Nov 1, 1943Oct 14, 1947Oradent Chemical Co IncMedicament cartridge or vial
US2473733 *May 31, 1947Jun 21, 1949Smith Arthur ESyringe
US2473734 *May 31, 1947Jun 21, 1949Smith Arthur EHypodermic syringe
US2483825 *Aug 12, 1946Oct 4, 1949Goldberg Samuel DSyringe and ampoule combination and ampoule
US2497562 *Aug 4, 1947Feb 14, 1950Smith Arthur EDisposable syringe
US2538391 *Jan 10, 1948Jan 16, 1951Arthur E SmithSyringe
US2661740 *Feb 7, 1952Dec 8, 1953Bishop & Co Platinum Works JDisposable syringe
US2706479 *Aug 1, 1952Apr 19, 1955Lockhart Marshall LAmpule
US2717601 *Mar 16, 1951Sep 13, 1955Frederick M TurnbullSyringe ampule
US2894509 *Jan 18, 1952Jul 14, 1959Becton Dickinson CoHypodermic syringe
US2902034 *May 14, 1954Sep 1, 1959American Med ProdPlastic syringe plunger
US2907328 *Mar 20, 1953Oct 6, 1959Miljam Instr CorpHypodermic syringe
US2939459 *Jan 11, 1957Jun 7, 1960Conrad W BaarsTandem syringe
US3043304 *Mar 30, 1959Jul 10, 1962Brunswick CorpHypodermic needle mount
US3557778 *Nov 18, 1968Jan 26, 1971Elbert L HughesBlood specimen collection assembly
US5139490 *Jul 24, 1990Aug 18, 1992Arzneimittel Gmbh Apotheker Vetter & Co.Hypodermic syringe
US5411499 *Jul 30, 1991May 2, 1995Baxter International Inc.Needleless vial access device
US5776125 *Apr 24, 1995Jul 7, 1998Baxter International Inc.Needleless vial access device
US5976115 *Oct 9, 1997Nov 2, 1999B. Braun Medical, Inc.Blunt cannula spike adapter assembly
US6193697Apr 9, 1999Feb 27, 2001Baxter International Inc.Pre-slit injection site and tapered cannula
US6213996Oct 29, 1998Apr 10, 2001Baxter International Inc.Pre-slit injection site and tapered cannula
US6261266Oct 29, 1998Jul 17, 2001Baxter International Inc.Pre-slit injection site and tapered cannula
US6447498Oct 29, 1998Sep 10, 2002Baxter International Inc.Pre-slit injection site and tapered cannula
US6569125Jul 17, 2001May 27, 2003Baxter International IncPre-slit injection site and tapered cannula
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/206, 215/364, 604/241, 215/247
International ClassificationA61M5/28, A61M5/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/347, A61M5/28
European ClassificationA61M5/34E, A61M5/28