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Publication numberUS2103627 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1937
Filing dateApr 9, 1935
Priority dateApr 9, 1935
Publication numberUS 2103627 A, US 2103627A, US-A-2103627, US2103627 A, US2103627A
InventorsMirenta August
Original AssigneeMirenta August
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch support
US 2103627 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. Z8, 1937., A. MIRENTA ARCH SUPPORT Filed April 9, 1955 Patented Dec. 28, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 10 Claims.

My invention has for an object to provide an improved arch support in the form of an insole which may be inserted in a shoe to relieve various ailments of the human foot, such, for instance, as Weak or iiat foot, metatarsalgia, Mortons toe and pronounced dislocation of the rst metatarsal phalangeal articulation.

A more specific object of my invention is to provide aninsole with a pad of novel form for supporting the anterior metatarsal arch. Heretofore it has been the practice to provide an elevation on the insole which rises to its highest point back of the metatarsal boneheads. I have found, however, that more satisfactory results are obtained by providing a metatarsal arch support which extends beyond the articulation of the metatarsal bones and the phalanges. My experience teaches that it is necessary to exert pressure on the metatarsal bones directly under their location and for this reason it is an object of my invention to provide a pad support forl the metatarsal arch which extends rearwardly approximately to the articulation of the external and middle cuneiform bones with the second and third metatarsals.

Another object of the invention is to provide an insole with a ilare adapted to lie under the first metatarsal bonehead, this flare being provided with a pad t0 Support said bonehead. It is within the purview of my invention to' form this pad as a separate element from the pad supporting the 'anterior metatarsal arch and also, if desired, to make these two pads integrally connected.

A further object of my invention is to provide an insole formed with either or both of the pads above described and having also a wedge shaped pad along the inner margin of the insole arranged to support the inner longitudinal arch of the foot. f

Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear in the following description of two embodiments thereof and thereafter the novelty and scope of the invention will be pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawing:

Figure 1 is a bottom plan view of an insole for the left foot, embodying one form of my invention, the skeleton of the foot being indicated in broken lines on the insole;

Fig. 2 is an edge view of the same looking from the right hand side of Fig. 1;

Figs. 3 and 4 are views in transverse section ,taken o n lines 3 3 and 4-4 respectively of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an end view looking from line 5-5 of Fig. 1 in the direction of the arrows;A

Fig. 6 is a fragmental bottom plan view of another form of my invention; and

Fig. 7 is a view in section taken on line 'I'-'I of Fig. 6.

The structure shown in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive comprises a main body I0 consisting of leather or other suitable flexible material contoured to fit within a shoe and extending from the heel to a point somewhat beyond the location of the metatarsal boneheads but slightly back of the toes. This body member has a flare II at one side which in use extends under the rst metatarsal bonehead. The body I0 has a plane upper surface, but on its under side is beveled along the outer margin` from the heel portion I2 around' the toe portion I3 to and including the are portion II.

As a support for the metatarsal arch a pad i4 is applied to the under side of the body. This pad is preferably composed of rubber but may also be made of leather or other suitable flexible material, and it rises from a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones, Vpreferably at the point where the exterior and middle cuneiform bones articulate with the second and third metatarsal bones. The pad I4 which is Vtransversely convexed rises gently from said point and reaches its maximum height and width substantially under the metatarsal bone heads. Thence, it extends forward, tapering toward the main body of the insole and terminating slightly behind the location of the toes. rlfhis pad may take different forms depending upon the particular defect to be corrected. Over the pad is tted a cover piece I5 of flexible material such as thinly skived'leather which is cemented to the body piece I0. y

Another insert I6 of suitable padding material is fitted between the cover I5 and the body I 0 at the flare II. The pad formed by this insert may be properly proportioned to the height of the pad I4 depending upon the conditions to be corrected. It will be understood that this pad serves to give proper support to the rst metatarsal bonehead.

Along the inner margin of the insole a pad I'I of -Wedge shape in cross section may be lnserted between the members I5 and I0 with the thin edge of the wedge disposed inwardly. The outer face of the wedge is preferably cut at an acute angle with respect; to the plane of the member I0.

In use the insole is introduced into the shoe PII with the plane surface uppermost and the pads exert pressure on, or, provide support for the foot through the flexible body Ill. The pad I4 will provide a support for the anterior metatarsal arch and wherever necessary the additional pad I6 Will provide a. support for the first metatarsal bonehead. The longitudinal arch may be supported by the wedge shape insert I1. I Wish it to be understood that my invention contemplates using Vthe pads I2, I4, and I6 either separately or in combination and either or both of'these pads may be combined With the support provided by the wedge shaped insert IT. It Will be understood also that the cross section of the insert I'l may be varied as required.

While in the structures so far described lhaveV referred to the pad I5 as a separate element from the pad I4, it will be obvious that in certain conditions these two pads could be integrally connected. Such a structure is shown in Figs. 6 and 7 in which parts substantially identical with those shownin Figs. 1 to 5 are given likereference numerals. It will be observed that in place of pads I4 and I5, I provide a single pad IdarI With a lateral extension Ia adapted to support the rst metatarsal bonehead. In other respects, the insole shown in Figs. 6 and '7 is the same as that previously described.

An important advantage of my improved support for the metatarsal arch lies in the fact that it extends substantially from the cuneiform bones to a point Well beyond the metatarsal boneheads with the highest part of the support at said boneheads., This provides a rocking effect resulting in material comfort, and it assists in restoring normal posture.

While I have shown and described two embodiments of myv invention these are to be taken as illustrative and not limitative and I reserve the right to make various changes in form, construction and arrangement of parts which fall within the spirit and scope of the following' claims.

I claim: Y

1. A support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to'support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad beginning at a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of the foot and gradually increasing in thickness therefrom until it reaches its greatest thickness substantially at the articulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads. Y Y

2. A support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to support the Vanterior metatarsal arch, said pad beginning. at a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of' the foot and gradually increasing in thickness therefrom until it reaches its greatest thickness substantially at the articulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads and extending thence forwardly to a point slightly behind the toes and tapering to a feather edge at the latter point.

3. AV support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad rising gradually from a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of the foot and reaching its greatest height substantially at the articulation of the phalange's with the metatarsal boneheads, said insole being also provided with a laterall ilare adapted to lie under the first metatarsal bonehead of the foot, and a resilient pad at said flare.

4. A support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad rising gradually from a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of the footV and reaching Yits greatest height substantially at the Varticulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads and extending thence forwardly to a point slightly behind the toes and tapering to a feather edge at the latter point, said insole being also provided with a lateral flare adapted to lie under the-first metatarsal bonehead of the foot and a resilient pad at said flare.

v 5. A supportrfor the human foot comprising a exible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad rising gradually from a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of the foot and reaching its'greatest height substantially at the articulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads and extending thence forwardly to a p oint slightly'behind the toes and tapering to a feather'edge at the latter point, said insole being also provided with a lateral nare adapted to lie under the rst metatarsal bonehead of the foot and a resilient pad at s aid nare, the latter pad andthe padsupporting the metatarsal arch being integrally connected.

6. A supportV for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided With an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad beginning at a point substantially at the location of the cuneiform bones of the foot and gradually increasing in thickness therefrom unf til'it reaches its greatest thickness substantially at the articulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheadsv and extendingl thence forwardly to a point slightly behind the toes and tapering to a feather edge'at the latter point, and a pad along the inner margin 'of the insole adapted to support the inner longitudinal arch of the foot. Y

7. A support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with'an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad beginning at a p oint substantially at the location of the cuneiformV bonesof the foot and gradually increasing in thickness therefrom until it reaches its greatest thickness substantially at the articulation of the v'phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads and extendingvthence forwardly to a point slightly behind the toes and tapering to a feather edge at theY latter point, and a pad along the inner margin of the insole adapted to support the inner longitudinal arch of the foot, the latter pad being Wedge shaped in cross section with the thin edge of the wedge disposed inwardly. Y

v V8. A support for the human foot comprising a flexible insole provided with an elongated pad adapted to support the anterior metatarsal arch, said pad rising gradually from a point substantially at therlocation of the cuneiform bones of the foot and reaching its greatest height substantially at the articulation of the phalanges with the metatarsal boneheads and extending thence forwardly to a point slightly behind the toes and tapering to a feather edge at the latter point, said insole being also provided with a lateral flare adapted to lie under the first metatarsal bonehead of the foot, a resilient pad at said flare, and a pad alongfthe inner margin ofthe insole adapted to support the inner longitudinal archof the foot, theV latter pad being wedge shaped in cross section with the thin edge of the Wedge disposed inwardly.

9. An insole comprising a main body piece of vexible material having a substantially plane to support the rst metatarsal bonehead, said pads being secured to the under face of the body piece, and a covering of thin exible material applied over the pads and secured to the body piece.

10. An insole comprising a main body piece of exble material having a substantially plane upper face and adapted to extend from the heel of the foot to a point well beyond the metatarsal boneheads, a central pad adapted to support the metatarsal arch and extending from a location substantially at the articulation of the exterior and middle cuneiform bones with the second and third metatarsal bones and rising thence to a maximum height at the articulation of the metatarsal bones with. the phalanges'and extending thence forwardto a feather edge substantially behind the toes, said body piece being formed with a lateral are, a pad atrsaid flare in position to support the first metatarsal bonehead, said pads being secured to the under face of the body piece, acovering of thin ilexible material applied over and secured to the main body piece, and an insert along the inner margin of the insole between the body piece and the cover piece adapted to support the 'inner longitudinal arch of the foot. 20

AUGUST MIREN TA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423622 *Oct 2, 1945Jul 8, 1947Herman L SamblanetSesamoid-cuboid foot balancer
US2468264 *Dec 8, 1945Apr 26, 1949Katz DavidFoot support
US2504704 *Sep 25, 1945Apr 18, 1950Lee Mary FrancesCombined arch and sole footpad
US2613456 *Feb 3, 1950Oct 14, 1952Joseph A AmicoArch support and metatarsal pad
US6785986Aug 1, 2000Sep 7, 2004C.D. Johgenengel Beheer BvShoe and sole fitted with torsion stiffener
US7140130 *Jun 14, 2004Nov 28, 2006Dr. Brooks Innovations, LlcInsole with a neuroma pad
US20130055592 *May 11, 2011Mar 7, 2013Oliver ElsenbachShoe insert and shoe
WO2001008524A1 *Aug 1, 2000Feb 8, 2001Johanna Louise BrandShoe and sole fitted with torsion stiffener
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/178
International ClassificationA43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1445, A43B7/22, A43B7/143, A43B7/142, A43B7/1425, A43B7/1435
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20A, A43B7/14A20C, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20F, A43B7/22