Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2103677 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1937
Filing dateOct 9, 1934
Priority dateOct 9, 1934
Publication numberUS 2103677 A, US 2103677A, US-A-2103677, US2103677 A, US2103677A
InventorsKline Walter, William A Brubaker
Original AssigneeEthel H Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spaced wall receptacle
US 2103677 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 28, 1937.,

W. KLINE ET AL f1 SPACED WALL RECEPTACLE iF'ivled Oct. 9, 1954 Sheets-Sheet 1 \Ill/ Dec. 28, 1937. w. KLINEv ET AL SPACED WALL RECEPTACLE 5 sheets-sheet 2 Filed Oct. 9, 1 954A im, mm. uw ohhh,

Dec. 28, 1937. w, KLINE ET AL 2,103,677

SPACED WALL RECEPTACLE Filed Oct. 9, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Dec. 2,8', 1937 PATENT OFFICE y 2,103,677 SPACED WALL RECEPTACLE Walter Kline, Wellington, and William A. Brubaker, Akron,r0hio; said Kline assigner to Ethel H. Morrison, Wellington, Ohio Application October 9, 1934, Serial No. '747,630

8 Claims.

Our present invention relates in general to spaced wall receptacles and has particular reference to a receptacle of this type in which a more or less fragile inner container is housed within an outer shell and protected thereby from the abuse to which the receptacle is ordinarily subjectedas a result of transporting'and otherwise moving the same about.

`4:At this time the brewery trade has been found to offer the widest eld of use for the invention, consequently particular attentionfhas been given tothe developing of the invention for this purpose. This accounts for showing a beer keg as the embodiment selected for the purpose of illustrating the invention in the accompanying drawings. It should be pointed out however, that .the invention is susceptible to otherdifferent modified embodimentsV which may come equally within the scope of the appended claims.

The present invention is based on certain improvements in the beer keg construction described and claimed in our pending applications. The main objectof the present case is to provide a spaced wall receptaclein which the inner container is fashioned from non-corrosive mad terial and is housed within a protective outer shell, preferably fashioned from sheet metal. In making up the inner container wehave taken into .account the inherent qualities of a ceramic material and for this reason prefer to employ the same atleast so far as beer kegs are concerned. In selecting' a ceramic material such as pottery we are enabled to take advantage of the noncorrosive features that it offers, its more or less rugged qualities, as compared to the more fragile qualities of glass and the ease with which it can be molded. It also offers several additional features which enable the material to cooperatein Athe beer keg assembly to better advantage than glass or metal. plain, however, that notwithstanding our preferencefor a ceramic material in some instances a glass Aor metal or a metal treated material such as porcelain ware, may serve a useful purpose for the inner container and for this reason we have chosen the term non-corrosive in describing the material so as not to unnecessarily limit the scope of the invention.

In the accompanying drawings; l Fig. l is a section through a structed in accordance with one form of our invention; Y

Fig. 2 is asimilar View of another form;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view in detail of the preferred type of bung hole assembly, and

Vribs I4. These ribs We .wish tol eX- y.

beer keg con-vr (Cl. 22o-15) Fig. 4 is a view in detail of the preferred rubber band or tire used on the outside of the shell.

Before referring to the drawings in detailA we wish to point out that we much prefer to employ that type of bung .hole illustrated inV Fig. 3,V owing to the fact that'it provides a more satisfactory floating connection for the. inner container which is an added protection against breakage and other injury to the inner container.

LReferring now to the' drawings in detail and particularly Fig. 1, 5 represents the inner container and 6 the metallic outer protective shell. In all forms of theV receptacle the walls Vof the container are spaced apart for insulating rand protective measures. The outer shell 6 is fashioned with a barrel shaped body portion I having open ends which are closed by the sepa-V When the keg is up ended it is supported upon u one or the otherv of the rubber bumpers I2. These bumpers also serve toA absorb jarsr when the keg is dropped upon either of the ends and also provide a tire like wheel on which the keg can be rolled.v As a further means of ab.-

sorbing jars and also providing tires upon which the keg may be rolled a pair or more of intermediate rubber bands I3 are secured to the circular I4 together with the rib-like corrugations I5 add rigidity to the structure of the shell. l.

Referring further to the end plates 8 and 9. The inwardly slanting web .portions I6 of these plates terminate in shoulders I1 providing circular slats'for the hollow rubber suspension rings I8 which serve as end supporting and shock absorbing suspension means for the inner container. To enable the rings to co-operate in this capacity theinner container is molded with corresponding circular seats as at I9 for the rings. In order to For insulating purposes as well as an additional protective measure the container 5 is coated, eX-

cept at the ends, with an asphalt or the equivalentV kind of composition 22 and. the` coating is enveloped in a relative thin jacket 23 of sheet metal. In Fig. 2, however, this coating and its cofoperat.-v

ing jacket is omitted for no reason other than to show that it is not necessary to employ the same in every instance.

Wenowrefer to the preferred Aform of bung opening which. is shown in. Fig. 3. In this preferred form the sleeve 24has 'a flared outer wall which fits within the gasket 25. YThe gasket is made witha concave outside to t the convex wall cf the container opening. Gasket 26 is made to fit thev slotted cavityv of 3|. withA its inside opening to impinge against the threaded surface of 24. Between gasket 2-5vand gasket 26 a space is provided to accommodate the rings which are threaded on the protruding end 28 of the sleeve. Under the ring 'l'is a washer 29. rIhreadedon the end'v 28 of the sleeve is acap plate 30 which covers the opening over the gasket 26- with-its outer periphery bearing upon the ring 3| which is seated in a cir--V cular depression in the shell. A wooden plug (not shown) canI be drivenl into the sleeve 24 and since the cap` 30 bears directly upon the shell the shock incident to driving the plug-in placeis transmitted tothe shell and not imposed on the ceramic container. To Wedge the gasket and Sleeve in the opening'of lthe container the threaded ringsZ'l are turned down which draws the sleeve up and causes it to spread the gasket. Another feature of this preferredtype of bung hole assembly resides in the iloating fit which, while malL'ng a perfectly tight closure, still is suciently flexibleor resilientv to compensate for restricted relative movement between theV shell and container.

Referring tothe bungv hole assembly shown in Fig. l, 33 represents a cover plate which has a slightly inset and downwardly depending skirt which occupies the opening in the outer shell.`

The edge of the opening makes a snug i'lt under the shoulder 34 of the skirt and impinges against the skirt'. A welding operation is used as at 35 to anchor the cover plate to the shell. Seated under the inwardly extending flange 36 of the cover plate is a ring 3l which' overlies the rubber Vring like cushio-n'. This cushion ts snugly around the reduced diameter 391 of the neck of the lling opening 4D of the container 5 andhas an inwardly turnedriiangeV 4| which overlies the shoulder 'of the reduced diameter. As Va result of this assembly a cushion is provided so as to protect the neck of the'container against injury since no metal partscome in direct contact with thesame. Inserted in the bung opening is a rubbergasket 42 whichis fashioned with concave sides toconform to the convex'sides ofthe opening. The gasket is made with acentral depression to admit a bearing plate 4 3 against which the vnut 44 of the bolt 45 rests. The bolt end'ca'rries a Wedging cone 46 which ts a corresponding space in the inserted end'of the gasket. It now follows that Vbyturningup on the nut-44the- Wedging conea. plate V54 46 will be pulled against the gasket causing the same to spread evenly outward in all directions so as to tightly'wedge the same in the opening to seal it.

In order to protect the rubber gasket, which protrudes into the container, from the alcoholic content of the beer as well as to protect the metal wedging cone We propose to.coat these parts with pitch as indicated at 41. I g A' j l We wish to also bring out at this time that the entire inside of the container 5 may be coated with pitch if and when it is found desirable.

The dispensing or tap shown in Fig. 1 uses a rubber gasket 48 which is made with concave sides to conform tothe convex opening in the container. A hollow tapered metal plug 49 is Viitted'into the gasket. The inner end of this plug is closed except fora restricted threaded opening made. to accommodate the dispensing tap line. The outer end of the plug is externally threaded to receivea nut 56. VThe gasketis made with an outer flange 5| which embraces the outer area of the container around .the opening to provide a cushioned seat for the nut 50and the outer shell 6 is admitted in agroove in the flange.

' By turning' upon the nut the tapered plug will'r spread the gasket in the opening and make a. tight t. A washer 52 is used in conjunction With.

the nut. `An ordinary wood'A plug may be used. to close the dispensing' opening until the beer is to be dispensed. Y

In Fig. 2 we have shown other forms of bungs and tap openings. ,The bung 53 is made up with. which is Welded as at 55 tothe shell and the same has an internally threaded and upstanding rim 56; Threaded into this rim is a ring 5l which bears upon the head 58 of the tapered metal sleeve 59. This sleeve is undercut as at 60 to receive the radially and inwardlyvoifse't flange 6| on the plate. The tapered sleeve isfitted within the gasket 62. The inside of" the gasket beingalso tapered to fit the sleeve with its Youtside concave to t the convex wall of the opening in the container.

By turning'the ring with a special Wrench such as a Spanner the sleeve can be forced into the gasket to Vspread the sameV and make atight t. The exposed ends of the gasket and sleevev mayv be covered with pitch to protect the same against the action of the alcoholic content of the beer. A wood plug is driven into the sleeve to close the opening.

The dispensing or tap opening in Fig. 2 is made substantially the same as the bung opening. except that the sleeve 63 is internally threaded at its inner end to connect with the dispensing line. y

It should also be explained that the inner container and outer protective metal shell are constructed the same in rboth Figs. Vl and-2. In this connection we wish to call particular attention:

to the c ush'ioned'suspension for the inner container as we iindY that this Vis most importantv in realizing a practical assembly.

The space between the walls Yof the inner con-v tainer 5 andthe outer protective shell 6 is substantially air tight. When lling the keg with beer an air line connection is made with the intake valve 64 and when dispensing the beer from the keg an air line'connection is made with the Valve 65. Our keg with this construction gives a balanced air pressure and forces the air pressure against the inside of the outer protective shell 6. From the above it will be seen that Wehave devised a spacediwall receptacle of= cheap butfi rugged construction and particularly one which is unusually adoptedV for the brewery trade. The manner of cushioning the inner ceramic or pottery container within the shell assures all possible protection for the same. The beer will be preserved in a more sanitary and practical manner than in the heretofore known types of kegs. It will not be subjected to the deteriorating effects of temperature changes to the same extent as with ordinary beer kegs. These and other advantageous features are all the resultsA of utilizing the salient features of construction described in the foregoing description.

We claim:

l. In a spaced wallreceptacle, an outer metal-v lic shell, an inner container of ceramic or the like material, complementary circular seats formed on the ends of the shell and container, hollow ring like resilient cushions occupying said seats for suspending the container within the ,shell in spaced relation thereto, a hollow circular radial band embracing the container around the middle thereof to assist the rings in the suspension of the container, resilient shock absorbing bands encircling the outside of the shell and at the ends thereof, said'shell and container having registering openings for filling and dispensing the contents of the'container and means joining the container and shell at said openings to permit a restricted oating movement of the container relative to said shell.

2.v In a spaced wall receptacle, an outer metallic shell, van inner container of ceramic or the like material, complementary circular seats formed on the ends of the shell and container, hollow ring like resilient cushionsl occupying said seats for suspending the container within the shell in spaced relation thereto, a hollow circular radial band embracing the container around the middle thereof to assist the rings in the suspension -of the container, resilient shock absorbing bands encircling the outside of the shell and at the ends thereof, said shell and container having registering openings for filling and dispensing the contents of the container and means joining the container and shell at said openings to permit a restricted floating movement of the container relative-to said shell, comprising a rubber gasket having curved outer walls fitting the curved Walls of the opening in the container, an inserted wedging member for said gasket, the inserted ends of said gasket and Wedging member being coated to insulate the same from the contents of the container.

3. A spaced wall receptacle, comprising an outer protective barrel-like shell, an inner noncorrosive container within the shell, said container and shell having registering openings, and means joining the container and shell at said openings permitting a limited floating movement between the container and the shell while sealing the connection between the shell and container, comprising a metallic sleeve having a flared end iitting within the opening in the container, a re- T silient gasket surrounding the iiared end of said sleeve having a concave outer surface to fit the convex surface in the container opening, an externally threaded extension on said sleeve projecting into the opening in the shell, a pair of ring nuts threaded on said extension adapted to draw the sleeve outwardly to spread the resilient gasket, a washer between the ring nuts and the top of the gasket, a tapered seat for said washer, a ring fixed to the outside of the shell having an undercut circular groove and a resilient washer fitting within said groove and overlying the ring nuts. 4. The combination as set forth in claim 3 and in which the thickness of the container around the opening therein is increased to elongate the depth of the gasket fitting.

5. In a spaced Wall receptacle, an outer metallic protective shell, an inner container of ceramic or the* like material, cushioning means suspending the container within the shell in spaced relation thereto, said shell and container having registering openings for filling and dispensing the contents of the container, and means locking the container and shell together at said openings and cooperating with the cushioning means permitting the container to have a restricted floating movement within the shell, comprising a rigid inserted sleeve surrounded by a resilient gasket.

6. In a spaced wall receptacle, an outer metallic protective shell, an inner container of ceramic or the like material, cushioning means suspending the container within the shell in spaced relation thereto, said shell and container having registering openings for filling and dispensing lthe contents oi the container, and means locking the container and shell together yat said openings and e co-operating with the cushioning means permitting the container to have a restricted floating movement within the shell comprising a gasket of resilient material a sleeve-like member inserted within the gasket and means co-operating with said sleeve-like member and responsive to manual manipulation from the exterior of the shell for causing the sleeve-like member to wedge (the gasket tightly within vthe opening.

7. In a spaced wall receptacle, an outer metallic protective shell, an inner container of ceramic or the like material, cushioning means ysuspending the container within the shell in spaced relation thereto, said shell and container having registering openings for filling and dispensing the contents of the container, and means locking the container and shell together at said openings and co-operating with the cushioning means permitting the container to have a restricted floating movement within the shell, comprising an inserted resilient gasket, non-resilient wedging means for said gasket and means responsive to manual manipulation from the exterior of the shell for causing the wedging means to spread the gasket within the opening which it occupies.

f 8. In a spaced wall receptacle, an outer metallic protective shell, an inner container of ceramic or the like material, cushioning means suspending the container within the shell in spaced relation thereto, said shell and container having registering openingsfor filling and dispensing the contents of the container, and means locking the container and shell together at said openings and co-operating with the cushioning means permitting the container to have a restricted floating movement within the shell comprising an inserted resilient gasket,rnonresilient wedging means for said gasket and a'member having a threaded connection with the outer shell and responsive to turning movement for causing the wedging means to spread the gasket within the opening which it occupies.

WALTER KLINE.

WILLIAM A. BRUBAKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2761451 *Apr 8, 1953Sep 4, 1956Mcilrath Roy ERubber protector for binders
US2915796 *Jun 28, 1957Dec 8, 1959Hines Flask CompanyFoundry flask
US3044607 *May 23, 1960Jul 17, 1962United Aircraft CorpShipping container
US3171790 *Oct 10, 1960Mar 2, 1965Atomic Energy Authority UkPressure vessel for a nuclear reactor
US3349940 *Dec 28, 1964Oct 31, 1967Cornelius CoThermally insulated tank
US4793491 *Nov 24, 1986Dec 27, 1988Fluoroware, Inc.Pressurizable chemical shipping vessel
US4972967 *Jan 16, 1990Nov 27, 1990Soltech, Inc.Water heater construction and sealing device therefor
US5040697 *Aug 22, 1990Aug 20, 1991Soltech, Inc.Water heater construction and sealing device therefor
US5419449 *Aug 8, 1994May 30, 1995Rheem Manufacturing CompanyWater heater foam stop apparatus and associated methods
US5421475 *Jul 5, 1994Jun 6, 1995Soltech, Inc.Water heater construction and sealing device therefore
US5509566 *Oct 14, 1994Apr 23, 1996Soltech, Inc.Water heater construction and sealing device therefor
US5657871 *Jan 11, 1996Aug 19, 1997Spartanburg Steel Products, Inc.Container with a stacking ring
US5730315 *Mar 22, 1996Mar 24, 1998Richoux; Jimmy A.Drum
US5829629 *Jun 9, 1997Nov 3, 1998Usher; Timothy J.Compressed gas cylinder container
US6595383 *Feb 22, 2001Jul 22, 2003Scott Technologies, Inc.Packaging for shipping compressed gas cylinders
DE1107147B *Aug 20, 1956May 18, 1961Neville Gwilliam LloydMetallbehaelter fuer Fluessigkeiten
WO1991010558A1 *Jan 7, 1991Jul 25, 1991Soltech IncWater heater construction and sealing device therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.19, 220/920, 220/DIG.100
International ClassificationB65D25/18, B65D39/08, B65D8/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D15/02, B65D39/082, Y10S220/01, Y10S220/92
European ClassificationB65D15/02, B65D39/08A