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Publication numberUS2104361 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1938
Filing dateJul 1, 1937
Priority dateJul 1, 1937
Publication numberUS 2104361 A, US 2104361A, US-A-2104361, US2104361 A, US2104361A
InventorsGwendolyn Bryant Beatrice
Original AssigneeGwendolyn Bryant Beatrice
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Envelope vanity
US 2104361 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 4, 1938.

B. G. BRYANT ENVELOPE VANITY Filed July 1, 1937 irajeniar 'mw W Patented Jan. 4, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application July 1, 1937, Serial No. 151,466

5 Claims.

This invention relates to vanity cases, and has for its object the carrying of loose powder and a puff in an envelope, in such a way that the powder will not sift out of the lower portion of the envelope and will at the same time be freely accessible to the puff. The invention seeks to overcome two great annoyances to users of vanity cases, first the necessity of opening a case before being enabled to use its mirror and secondly the mussing of handbag linings and of clothing with the face powder which invariably sifts out of the cases now in use.

The forms which my invention may assume are exemplified in the following description and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a front view of the open envelope.

Fig. 2 is a front view of the open envelope vanity case showing double rows of arcuate lines of stitching.

Fig. 3 is an edge view of an open envelope vanity.

Referring in detail to Fig. l, I show a mirror H attached to the underside of the envelope flap. The flap folds along line CD so that A the upper portion of a snap attached to the underside of the flap fastens into B the lower half of the snap. The portion of the envelope above the powder line EG forms a perfect square which snugly fits or encloses a circular powder puff of the thick standard type. The depth of the space below the powder line or the distance EF is approximately equal to one-fourth the length of the side of the square mentioned above but may be increased or decreased a very little if desired but the more it is decreased the more often the case will need refilling with powder. The distances EX and GK are also approxi mately one fourth the length of the side of the same square; the exact dimensions are determined by the thickness or the quality of the pufi used by the manufacturer but in every case the dimensions must absolutely be such that the puff fits snugly inside the envelope when it is closed and with the lower edges of the puff resting against the rows of stitching at lines KY and KY. The line XY is a sector of a tangent to the circumference of the puff, and which begins at X a point on the powder line EG halfway between the center of the base of the envelope and the side of the envelope; but the line at this same position as XY may take the form of an arc of approximately the same length as XY drawn parallel to the arc of the circumference of the puff at these points thereby giving a curved line instead of a straight line as a powder-obstructing line of stitching. The straight line is recommended as it allows the greater ease of slipping the puff in and out of the powder area. The material used should be not only non-porous to face powder but also smooth on the inside of the case so that there is no friction when inserting or removing the puff. One or two rows of stitches may be used at XY as desired and the snap may be placed at the edge of the flap if desired and a mirror may or may not be attached to the flap. The matter of the snap or the matter of the mirror are neither one related to the advantages of the powder-obstructing stitches placed above each lower corner of the envelope. The line XY drawn tangent to the circumference is very practical when it makes an approximately forty-five degree angle at points X and Y in the triangle XYG or triangle XYE. The space at the bottom of the envelope is left free to contain loose powder as indicated in Fig. 1.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and .desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An envelope made of material that is not porous to face powder, two short lines of stitching across the envelope, each line beginning a short distance above a lower corner and extending downwardly a short distance in a diagonal direction and not to the bottom of the envelope so that a circular puff may be supported upon the lines of stitching within the envelope while a loose powder compartment is formed in the portion of the envelope below the stitching.

2. An envelope made of material that is not porous to face powder, two short straight lines of stitching across the envelope, each line beginning a short distance above a lower corner and extending downwardly a short distance, tangent to the circumference of a circular pufi supported within the envelope upon said lines of stitching, but not extending to the bottom of the envelope so that a loose powder compartment is formed in the portion of the envelope below the stitching.

3. An envelope made of material that is not porous to face powder, two short accurate lines of stitching across the envelope, each line beginning a short distance above a lower corner and extending downwardly a short distance, parallel to that are of the circumference of a circular puff supported within the envelope upon said accurate lines of stitching but not extending to the bottom of the envelope so that a loose powder compartment is formed in the portion of the envelope below the stitching.

4. An envelope made of material that is not 2 porous to face powder, two short lines of stitching across the envelope, each line consisting of two parallel rows of stitches placed close to each other and. each line beginning a short distance above a lower corner and extending downwardly a short distance and not to the bottom of the envelope so that a circular puff may be supported upon the lines of stitching within the envelope while a loose powder compartment is formed in the portion of the'envelope below the stitching.

5. An envelope made of material that is not porous to face powder, two short lines of stitching across the envelope, each line beginning a short distance above a lower corner and extending downwardly a short distance in a diagonal dire t tion and not to the bottom of the envelope so that a circular pufi may be supported upon the lines tached to the underside of the envelope flap is left pendant outside the envelope when the snap fastener is fastened, and the face of the mirror hangs against the corresponding face of the envelope.

BEATRICE GWENDOLYN BRYANT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3279594 *Feb 4, 1965Oct 18, 1966Worthington Iii George YProtective envelope for flat articles and package containing said articles
US4934584 *May 30, 1989Jun 19, 1990The Mead CorporationPortfolio with mirrorized cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/304
International ClassificationA45D33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D33/005
European ClassificationA45D33/00F