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Publication numberUS2104431 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1938
Filing dateNov 26, 1935
Priority dateNov 26, 1935
Publication numberUS 2104431 A, US 2104431A, US-A-2104431, US2104431 A, US2104431A
InventorsFred Marasso
Original AssigneeUnion Machinery Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Proofer tray
US 2104431 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. MARASSO Jan. 4, 1938.

PROOFER TRAY Filed NOV. 26, 1935 Patented Jan. 4, 1938 PROOFER TRAY Fred Marasso, Joliet, Ill., assignor to Union Machinery Company, J oliet,

Illinois 111., a corporation of Application.November 26, 1935, Serial No. 51,653

10 Claims.

This invention relates to proofer trays and has reference more particularlyto proofer trays that employ liners for preventing the lumps of dough from adhering ,to them. Trays of this character are employed in proofing apparatus for the purpose of conveying lumps of dough through the proofing chamber thereof and are usually rotatively carried by conveyor chains, one locatedat each end of the, trays, and traveling upon suitable rails and around sprocket Wheels contained in the proofing chamber.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a tray with means to prevent the liner from creeping endwise beyond the tray, thereby preventing the liner from being caught upon the chains or caught by the sprocket wheels over which the chains travel.

Anotherobject is'to provide a tray with a liner that is capable of creeping circumferentially about the tray, but'incapable of endwise movement beyond the ends of the tray.

Another object is to provide transverse members in the tray for dividing it into several pockets, whereby the liner is dented upwardly by the transverse members so as to form individual pocket liners for the several lumps of dough.

Another object is to provide means whereby dusting flour may readily escape between the. ends of thetrays and the. conveyor chains.

Other objects and advantages willappear in the course of the following specification, and with all of said objects and advantages inview, this invention consists in the several novel-features of construction, arrangement and combination of parts hereinafter fully set forthand more particularly defined in the claims.

The invention. is clearly illustrated in the drawing accompanying this "specification, in which:---

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of la proofer tray, embodying a simple form of the present invention, a fragment of a proofer cabinet and rails being shown in-vertical cross-section;

Fig. 2 is a plan of the proofing tray and fragments ofthe conveyor chains;

Fig. 3 is a view of the proofing tray, partly in end elevation and partly in cross section, taken on the. line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a vertical, cross-section, taken. on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4, but showing the tray in inverted position;

Fig. 6 is a fragmental, vertical, longitudinal section, taken on the line 6..-6 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 7 is a fragmental, vertical, longitudinal section, through. a slightly modified form of the invention.

Referring to said drawing and. first to Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive, the reference characters 10,-.10 designate the side walls of the proofing cabinet of a. proofer of ordinary construction, upon which walls are mounted rails H. Traveling upon said rails and around the sprocket wheels (not shown) mounted in the proofing chamber, are conveyor chains l2, which are driven by suitable means and convey the trays through the proofing chamber from its receiving end to its discharge end, as is well known.

At suitably spaced intervals along the length of the conveyor chain, .the links are provided with oppositely disposed pivot pins l3 which pivotally support the proofer trays so that they may be inverted at the discharge end for the purpose of discharging the lumps of dough therefrom.

Hanger blocks M are provided for carrying trays and said hanger blocks are formed with hearing apertures to receive the pins 13 and are also provided with wings I5 which engage the tray inverting mechanism (not shown).

The proofer tray forming the subject matter of this specification, comprises a plural pocket tray l6 and a sleeve-like liner l1 composed of textile fabric which surrounds the tray and is of considerably greater circumferential dimensions than that of the tray, whereby it is free to creep around the tray.

The tray is desirably formed of a sheet metal,

trough-like body l8, preferably of substantially semi-circular form in cross-section, the side edges of which. are curled around rods l9 that project beyond the ends of the tray and are rigidly secured in ears 20 formed at the ends of the hanger blocks Id. The ends of the trayare desirably formed of sheet metal end pieces 2!, soldered to the end edges of the tray body and to the rods IS. The edge portions of the end pieces project beyond the top, sides and bottom .of the body of the tray and provide flanges 22 that project laterally from the body of the tray and serve as guards to prevent the liner from creeping beyond the ends thereof.

The circumference of the end pieces may be slightlylgreater than the circumference of the liner,- so that at no time can the liner accidentally creep over the end pieces. As shown, the

upper edges of the end pieces may be straight, but this is, immaterial. The side and bottom edges are desirablycircular, and parallel the sides .and bottom of the body of the tray.

Spaces are left between the end pieces 2! of the tray and the hanger blocks M, which permit dusting flour to freely fall through said spaces instead of lodging upon the rails and conveyor chains.

The invention is shown in connection with a plural pocket tray adapted to convey several lumps of dough at a time. The individual pockets may be formed by providing transverse members across the hollow of the tray and, as shown,-said transverse members are formed by stamping the material; otthetray upward at spaced intervals along its length, as at 24, thereby providing low across the partitions, the liner is dented upwardly, as at 25, thereby leaving depressed portions in the pockets between the partitions for receiving the individual lumps of dough.

When the tray is'loaded, the upper portion of the liner rests upon the bottom of the tray, except at the partitions, where it is dented upwardly,

and the lumps of dough are thereby held in the several pockets in spaced relation to each other.

The lower half of the liner hangs down considerably below the bottom of the tray, but it is prevented from creeping endwise beyond the tray by the flanges'22 of the end pieces 2|. When the .trayis inverted, as se en in Fig. 5, the liner then 7 rests upon the inverted tray and the lumps of dough are discharged. therefrom, the flanges 22 serving to prevent the liner from creeping beyond the ends of the tray and becoming caught by the chains or sprocket wheels.

The circumferential movement of the liner about the tray, which is imparted to it upon rotation of the tray, is confined to thespace between the flanges at the ends thereof, because in all of the positions assumed by the liner its ends will encounter the flanges at the ends of the tray.

Each time that the tray is inverted, the liner creeps circumferentially about the tray, so as to present a new place thereon for other lumps of dough to rest upon. V

In the modified form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 7, the liner I1 is prevented from creeping endwise on the tray by a button or other fastening device 26,'secured to the lower side of the tray and engaging in a button hole or coacting fastening device in the liner. In this form of the invention, the liner does not creep circumferentially about the tray, but it is prevented from creeping lengthwise beyond the ends thereof.

More or less variation of the exact details of construction is possible without departing from the spirit of this invention; I desire, therefore, not to limit myself to the exact form of the constructionshown and described, but intend, in the following claims to point out all of the invention 'flanges against endwise disclosed herein.

I claim as new Patent: 7

' 1. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a

rotatively mounted plural pocket tray, a sleevelike liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric surrounding the tray, the circumference of the liner being of sufficient extent to permit it to lie on the bottom of the tray when in upright position, and means on the tray to prevent the liner from creeping beyond the ends thereof. I 7 2. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a rotatively'mount'ed solid bottom plural pocket tray having flanges at its ends, which project laterally beyond the' top, bottom and sides of the tray, and a sleeve-like liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray and. held thereon by said movement beyond the ends of the tray, the liner being free to creep circumferentially around the tray.

3. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a rotatively mounted tray having spaced transverse and desire to secure by Letters members therein of less height than the body of the tray, dividing the same into a plurality of pockets, and a sleeve-like liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray and arranged to be dented upwardly by said transverse members, whereby to form separate depressions in the liner.

4. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a rotatively mounted solid bottom tray having spaced transverse members therein of less height than the body of the tray, dividing the same into a plurality of pockets, a sleeve-like liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray and arranged to be dented upwardly by said transverse members, whereby to form separate depressions in the liner, and means to prevent the liner from creeping lengthwise beyond the ends of the tray.

5. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a rotatively mounted tray having spaced transverse members therein of less height than the body of the tray, dividing thesame into a plurality of pockets, a sleeve-like liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray and arranged to be dented upwardly by said transverse members, whereby to form separate depressions in the tray, and laterally projecting flanges at the ends of the tray 7 for preventing the liner from creeping beyond rotatively mounted tray having partitions dividing the same into a plurality of pockets, a sleevelike liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the .tray and arranged to be dented upwardly by said partitions, whereby to form separate depressions in the liner, and means on the tray to prevent the liner from creeping lengthwise beyond the ends of the tray.

8. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a rotatively mounted tray having a plurality of partitions of less height than the body of the tray,

struck up from the material thereof and dividing the same into a plurality of pockets, and. a sleevelike liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray and arranged to be dented upwardly by said partitions, whereby to form separate depressions in the tray;

9. A proofer tray, comprising in combination, a plural pocket tray having rolled side edges, rods secured in said rolled edges and projecting beyond the ends thereof, a sleeve-like liner composed of textile fabric loosely surrounding the tray, means to prevent endwise movement of the liner beyond the ends of the tray, hanger blocks spaced from the ends of the trayand fastened upon the ends of said rods, and conveyor chains at the sides of the hanger blocks, upon which the latter are rotatively mounted.

10. A proofer tray comprising a plural pocket tray, a sleeve-like liner of greater length than its width, composed of textile fabric surrounding the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435498 *Jun 3, 1943Feb 3, 1948Hapman Conveyors IncConveyor structure with pivoted buckets
US2476039 *Mar 18, 1944Jul 12, 1949Hannah J HapmanMaterial loss-preventing device for bucket conveyers
US2584025 *Feb 23, 1949Jan 29, 1952William H KelseyElevator bucket with suction barrier
US2640583 *Jan 11, 1951Jun 2, 1953J H Day Company IncProofer tray
US2755913 *Aug 8, 1949Jul 24, 1956Union Machinery CompanyProofer tray
US2902142 *Feb 18, 1957Sep 1, 1959Lawrence Girardi AntonioFruit harvesting mechanism
US4565277 *Jul 9, 1980Jan 21, 1986Benier B.V.Dough tray for a pre-proofer
US8127957 *Jan 5, 2007Mar 6, 2012Neuenkirchener Maschinenfabrik Emil Kemper GmbhSuspended receptacle for at least one piece of dough and set consisting of a plurality of suspended receptacles of this type
US8163323Aug 10, 2007Apr 24, 2012New French Bakery, Inc.Baking system and process with intermediate proofing
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/713
International ClassificationA21C13/00, A21C13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA21C13/02
European ClassificationA21C13/02