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Publication numberUS2105647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1938
Filing dateDec 3, 1936
Priority dateDec 3, 1936
Publication numberUS 2105647 A, US 2105647A, US-A-2105647, US2105647 A, US2105647A
InventorsTheodore Gutwein
Original AssigneeTheodore Gutwein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 2105647 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 18, 1938 lT. GUTwElN 2,105,647

sHoE

Filed Dec. 5, 1936 2 sheets-sheet 1 .the insole for purposes of ventilation.

Patented Jan. 18, 1938 UNETED STATES PATENTOFFICE SHOE Theodore Gutwein, Dayton, Ohio Application December 3, 1936, Serial No. 114,027

6 Claims.

parts of the shoe, which will be durable and which will be economical to manufacture. l

Specic advantages are inherent in the invention, many of which will be apparent from the following detail description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

Fig. 1 is a bottom View, partly in section, of a shoe ofthe McKay type embodying the in- Vention;

Fig. 2 is a cross section on line 2-2, Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan View of an inner soie with the ller attached to the insole, as used in Fig. 1,;

Fig. 4 isa bottom view, partly in section, of a Goodyear welt shoe embodying the invention;

Fig. 5 is a cross section on line 5-5, Fig. 4; and,

Fig. 6 is a cross section on line 6 6, Fig. 4.

The embodiment shown in Fig. 1 includes certain conventional elements of a McKay shoe, including anv upper I having a ,lining 2 with inner edges 3 turned over the edges of an insole 4. It includes an outsole 5, which is attached to the upper by a line of stitches 6 passing through the insole, the inturned edges 3 of the upper, and the outsole.

The McKay shoe, as illustrated in Fig. 1, may be constructed according to the ordinary methods of manufacture except as to the insertion of the novel filler section, which includes a layer of fabric 'I upon which is superimposed a layer of soft or sponge rubber 8.

'I'he fabric 1 may be co-extensive in size with the forepart of the insole while the rubber layer 8 maybe of a size and so positioned as to lie Wholly within the inturned edges 3 of the upper. The layer of rubber may have its edges bevelled,

as shown at 9. The rubber layer is preferably` attached to the fabric 1 by a line or lines of stitches III, and the filler strip so prepared may then be attached by cement to the insole 4.

After the insole hasv been so combined with the ller strip a series of perforations II may be stamped through the rubber, the fabric and Actual practice has shown that the use of these perforations passing through at least the insole, and preferably also through the fabric and rubber, adds materially to the comfort of the shoe preventing the foot from heating.

In lasting a shoe of the McKay type, as shown in Figs. 1 to 3, staples I2 passing through and engaging the edge 3 of the upper, the fabric 'I and the insole 4 may preferably be used. In bottoming the shoe a line of stitches 6 will engage the insole, the outsole andy pass through the 10 outer edge of the fabric 8 as well as the inturned edge 3 of the upper.

I'he embodiment shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6, apart from the construction and arrangement of the ller section, embodies the conventional features of a Goodyear Welt shoe. It includes an upper I4 having its edge turned over the edge of an insole I5 and secured by a line of stitches or an inseam I6 to a flange portion I'l; the stitches I6 also engaging a welt I8. An outer sole I9 is attached to the upper by a line of stitches 20 passing through the outsole and the Welt.

The embodiment specifically shown in the drawings has a nailed heel seat. The inturned edges of the upper being secured by tacks 2| which engage the insole I5. The outer sole and a heel lift 22 may be attached to the upper by nails 23.

In the Goodyear Welt shoe, as shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6, a filler section is constructed similar to that described in connection with the preceding gures. A layer of rubber 24 is superimposed upon a layer of fabric 25, to which it is attached by a line of stitches 26. In either type of shoe it is a matter of choice whether the ller member extends throughout the entire length of the shoe or not. In Figs. 1, 2 and 3 it is illustrated as covering only the forepart while in the embodiment shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 it is illustrated as extending throughout the length of the shoe.

The rubber section 24 is smaller in extent than the fabric section 25, thereby leaving an edge 2'I about the rubber. This extended edge 21 of the fabric is cut somewhat smaller than the contour of the sole of the i'lnished shoe but it is of such an extent as to be engaged by the stitches 20 passing through the outer sole and the welt. As shown in the drawings, the extended edge 21 extends uniformly around the entire shoe, but this is a matter of 'choice since this extended edge may consist onlyV of a plurality of ears which may be engaged in spots by the stitches 20. The embodiment specically shown in Figs.

4 and 6 has a nailed heel seat. In such a case the edge 21 at the heel will be tucked under the inturned edge of the upper and will be engaged by the tacks 2l, which pass through the edge of the upper and into the insole. If, however, a sewed seat is used 'the edge 21 of the fabric will be arranged at the heel section of the shoe as it is arranged at the forepart, that is, it will lie between the welt and the outer sole to be engaged by the line of stitches attaching the outer sole to the welt.

In both embodiments, as specifically shown in the drawings, the layer of rubber is first attached by stitches to lthe layer of fab-ric so that the filler section is a unitary structure. This ller section is then cemented to the insole. IIn ,the McKay structure the ller section is attached to the insole before the shoe is lasted, the edges of the upper being turned over the edge of the fabric as well as the edge of the inner sole. In the Goodyear welt shoe the ller unit is cemen-ted to the insole after the insole has been attached to the upper. Thus, in the embodiment specifically shown the rubber is stitched to the fabric by long loose stitches While the filler unit including both the rubber and the fabric are initially attached to the insole by cement.

It will be obvious, however, that in certain processes of shoe manufacture, which differ from or which are modifications of the prevailing types, other specific means of attachment may be desirable. Thus it may be desirable to attach the rubber to the fabric by a cement rather than by stitches. rubber, the fabric and the insole together by the same stitches with or without the use of cement. In the use of a cutout insole where a shoe is made according to the Sbicca method it is desirable to secure these parts together, that is the insole, the rubber and the fabric, all by a line of stitching extending about the cut-out portion of the insole.

It is desirable to use stitching as an attaching means for uniting the rubber with the fabric whether those stitches also pass through the insole or not, because the stitches prevent the rubber from creeping when the shoe is warm much more effectively than does cement. But a satisfactory shoe can be made by the use of cement forvsecuring the rubber to thefabric. In most methods of shoe manufacture a line of stitches is used for uniting the outsole to the upper and in that case that line of stitches mayv or staples, although this is not absolutely neces.

sary in order to obtain a serviceable shoe because shoes manufactured without the use of lber from creeping and secures a uniform layer of rubber throughout thelife of the shoe. In addition, the fabric serves as an attaching means by having an edge extending outwardly beyond the rubber layer which may be engaged by tack- Or, it may be desirable to attach the ing means, at points where the inclusion of the rubber layer would result in unnecessary bulk.

Sponge rubber for purpose of a filler between the insole and outsole is'already al commercial product so that its characteristics need not be described to those skilled in the art. It is usually one-eighth inch thick or less. The fabric should be a tough, closely woven piece of goods and unyielding. Shoe drill is satisfactory for this purpose but a cloth which is prepared specially for airplane construction and known as airplane cloth has been found to be preferable because of its strength and unyielding qualities without unnecessary bulk. l

It is to be noted that in the McKay shoe, as specifically illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the fabric is placed adjacent the insole while in the Goodyear welt type, illustrated in Figs. 4, 5

and 6, the fabric is placed adjacent the outsole. The reason for this will be apparent from an "Y inspection of the drawings, because in the one case the edge of the fabric is secured adjacent the insole while in the other case the fabric is secured adjacent the outsole. The particular type of shoe and the particular method employed in making it will usually determine whether the fabric should be adjacent the outsole or adjacent the insole.

The advantages of a shoe employing this invention should be obvious from the foregoing description. The rubber insert, which is securely held in position, gives a soft cushion for the foot and the particular structure prevents the rubber or ller from creeping and piling up in ridges or lumps, while the method of its attachment enables the shoe to be manufactured without including the rubber in the principal seams of the shoe where any unnecessary bulk would produce a clumsy shoe.

The preferred method of applying the inven.

tion has been illustrated and described in detail, but it will be obvious from the foregoing description that various changes may be made in the details of construction, within the scope of the appended claims, withoutdeparting from the spirit of this invention and that parts of the invention may be used to advantage without'thev whole.

I claim:

1. In a shoe having an outer sole, an inner sole and an upper having its marginal edges extending over the vedge of the inner sole and positioned between said soles, the combination cornprising a cushion member inserted between said soles and consisting of a layer of sponge rubber superimposed upon a layer of fabric, the rubber being smaller in extent than the fabric, a seamv of fasteners securing the fabric to the rubber, the layer of rubber being so proportioned and positioned as to lie wholly within the edges of the upper, and means for securing the fabric beyond the rubber to at least one of said soles.'

2. AIn a shoe having an outer sole, an inner sole and an upper having its marginal edges extending over the edge of the inner sole and positioned between said soles, the combination comprisinga cushion member inserted between said soles and consisting of a. layer of sponge rubber superimposed upon a layer of fabric, the :rubber being smaller in extent than the fabric, a seam of fasteners securing the fabric to the rubber, and stitches securing vthe outer sole with the shoes and passing through the fabric beyond the rubber.

3. In a shoe having an outer sole, an4 inner sole and an upper having its marginal edges extending over` the edge of the inner sole and positioned between said soles, the combination comprising a cushion member inserted between said soles and consisting of a layer of sponge rubber superimposed upon a layer of fabric, the layer of rubber being smaller in extent than the layer of fabric, a seam of fasteners securing the fabric to the rubber, the edge of the fabric extending between the inturned edge of the upper and the inner sole, and means for securing the fabric beyond the rubber to the upper.

4. In a shoe having an outer sole, an inner sole and an upper having its marginal edges extending over the edge of the inner sole and positioned between said soles, the combination comprising a cushion member inserted between said soles and consisting of a layer of sponge rubber superimposedA upon a layer of fabric, the

layer of rubber being smaller in extent than the layer of fabric, a seam of fasteners securing the fabric to the rubber, and stitches uniting the outer soie, the inner sole and the-upper and passing through the fabric beyond the rubber.

5. In a shoe having an outer sole, an inner sole and an upper having its marginal edges extending over the edge of the inner sole and positioned between said soles, the combination comprising a cushion member` inserted between said soles and consisting of a. layer of sponge rubber and a strip of fabric extending beyond the rubber, a seam of fasteners securing together the fabric, rubber and inner sole, and stitches passing through `the outer sole, inner sole, marginal edges of the upper and that part of the fabric extending beyond the rubber.

6. In a welt shoe the combination comprising an outer sole, an inner sole, an upper having its marginal edges extending over the inner sole and positioned between said soles, a cushion member inserted between said soles and consisting of a layer ofl sponge rubber and a strip of fabric extending beyond the rubber, a seam of fastners securing the fabric to the rubber, and stitches securing the outer sole to the welt and passing through the fabric beyond the rubber.

THEODORE GUTWEIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2817163 *Aug 11, 1955Dec 24, 1957Arnold Clark JohnCushioned shoe construction
US5699627 *Nov 29, 1994Dec 23, 1997Castro; Ramon SalcidoIntegral system for the manufacture of cushioned shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/30.00A, 36/3.00B, 12/146.00C
International ClassificationA43B13/42
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/42
European ClassificationA43B13/42