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Publication numberUS2106658 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1938
Filing dateJun 11, 1936
Priority dateJun 11, 1936
Publication numberUS 2106658 A, US 2106658A, US-A-2106658, US2106658 A, US2106658A
InventorsAlexander J Rakos
Original AssigneeAlexander J Rakos
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Alarm system
US 2106658 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. J. RAKOS ALARM SYSTEM Jan. 25, 1938.

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 11, 1956 AZexcznaZer i akoa @ajMlZ.

HIS ATTORNEYS Jan. 25, A J RAKOS ALARM SYSTEM Filed June 11, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 AZe/z'andel" 1] H15 ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 25, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFIQE 2 Claims.

My invention relates to electric alarm systems, and has among its objects and advantages the provision of improved switch mechanism for secretly setting the system in operation.

An object of my invention is to provide alarm circuit actuating switch means which may be carried on the person and so related to that person that the switch means may be actuated without use of the hands or without bodily movements which betray the fact that the alarm has been given or that the switch means is carried on the person.

A further object is to provide circuit closing means which is automatically actuated when the operator lifts his arms to a predetermined angle in response to the command hands up by a person with criminal intent.

Another object is to provide an alarm circuit in which novel means is employed for preventing the alarm from being accidentally set'in operation, and in which means is provided for maintaining a closed circuit once the switch means has been actuated by the operator.

Another object is to provide an electric circuit in which a novel gravity actuated and pressure responsive switch combination is employed, whereby the circuit may be closed by merely raising the arms or by pressing the arms against the body or by raising one arm and pressing the other arm against the body.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the manner in which the actuating mechanism is carried on the person;

Fig. 2 is a perspective View of a garment with the actuating mechanism attached thereto;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustrating the switches detached from the garment;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view along the line 4-4 of Fi 3;

Fig. 5 is asectional View along the line 55 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view along the line 6--6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view along the line 'l--'! of Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is a sectional view along the line 8-8 of Fig. 5; and

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view of the circuit.

In the embodiment selected to illustrate my invention, I make use of a garment H] which is conventional and may be worn on the person in the usual way, as indicated in Fig. 1. Within the sleeves l2 and adjacent the arm pits thereof I mount switch devices l4, which are carried by a strap l6 pinned to the inner side of the garment at l8. The switch devices are pinned to the sleeves at 20.

Switch devices M are identical in construction and operation, so that the description of one 6 will apply to both. Referring to Figs. 5 to 8, inclusive, the switch device i l illustrated therein comprises a box having a supporting wall 22, side walls 24, and an end wall 26. These walls are formed of insulating material and are pref- 10 erably connected as a unit. Upon the wall 22 I mount a gravity operated switch 28 comprising a tube 30 rectangular in cross section and provided with cars 32 riveted to the wall 22 at 3Q. Tube 36 is formed of conductive material 15 and encloses a gravity responsive contact 36 of conductive material. The contact 36 is so proportionally related to the tube 3i] as to be freely movable therein, but to have good electrical contact therewith. 29

Fig. 6 illustrates the normal position of the switch devices M, at which time the upper end of the contact 36 is arranged in spaced relation with an abutment contact as having an car 40 riveted to the wall 22 at 42. Abutment 38 is provided with a recess M into which the tapered end 46 of the contact 36 drops when the arm is lifted sufficiently far to cause the contact 36 to drop. The tapered relation between the abutment 38 and the contact 36 establishes good elec- 3Q trical contact. Within the lower end of the tube 30 I mount a pad 48 of resilient material for sound damping purposes when the contact 36 falls to the normal position of Fig. 6.

A companion contact 5!] is riveted to the wall 5 22 at 52 in spaced relation with the tube 30. A conductor 5 electrically connects the abutment 38 with the. contact 56, while a conductor 56 electrically connects the tubes 3% in the two switch devices H (see Fig. 9). cord 60 in Fig. 1, which is provided with a conventional plug 62 for connection with the usual Wall outlet 64. One of the wires 58 is connected with the contact 59 of one switch device I4,

while the other wire 58 is connected with the contact of the other switch device l4.

Each wire 58 is connected with one of the wires 54 so that the wires 58 are also connected with the abutments 38. It will thus be seen by refer- 5o ence to Fig. 9 that the switch devices M are connected in series and that the circuit may be closed only by actuating both switch devices. Such actuation may be attained by merely shifting the position of the devices to a sufiicient de- 55 Wires 58 comprise the 40 gree to cause the contacts 36 to move into contacting relation with the abutments 38.

Means is also provided for closing the circuit by pressing the switch devices I4 between the arms and the body of the operator. To this end a cover 66 is movably connected with the wall 22 by a U shaped spring member 68. One leg of the U shaped member is riveted at III to the wall 22 while the other leg is riveted at I2 to the cover 66. Cover 66 is made of insulating material and is normally held in slight angular relation with the wall 22, as illustrated in Fig. 5. To the inner face of the cover 66 I mount a contact strip I4 for bridging the tube 30 and the contact 5|] when the cover is pressed in the direction of the wall 22 against the tension of the spring 68. Rivets I6 connect the contact strip I4 with the cover 66, and its ends I8 are distorted out of the normal plane of the strip so as to engage the contact 56 and the tube 30 upon slight movement of the cover 66.

Each switch device I4 is enclosed within a cover 83 of resilient material such as rubber, which cover includes overlying parts 82 stitched together at 84 for defining a flap for the pin 20. Similarly, the cover 38 is extended at 86 to overlie the strap 56 and secured thereto by stitching 88. In Figs. 3 and 4, I illustrate the wires 56 and 58 as being housed within the strap I6. This strap may be bent back over the wires 56 and 58 and stitched together at 90 for holding the wires in place.

In Fig. 9, the alarm is indicated generally at 92, and the source of current at 94. Signal 92 may be either of the audible or visual type, or a combination of both. A wire 96 connects the signal with the battery 64, which wire may be provided with a switch 98. The relay I00 is connected with the signal 92 by a wire I62 and also with the wall outlet 64 by a wire I04. A wire I06 connects the wall outlet 64 with the battery 94 while a wire I08 connects the Wire I06 with an armature I I 0 arranged in operative relation with the relay I96. This armature is moved into electrical contact with a contact II2 when the relay is energized. Contact II 2 is electrically connected with the wire I04 by a wire H4.

The signal 92 is actuated when the switch devices I4 are turned about their transverse axes sufliciently far to bring the contacts 36 into engagement with the abutments 38. Thus, the alarm is set in operation when the person is commanded to raise his arms, as shown in Fig. 1. In connecting the switch devices I4 in series I provide a circuit in which accidental actuation of the system is prevented since the switch devices I4 require coordinating movement of the arms. When once the circuit is closed, the relay I00 operates to maintain a closed circuit through the signal 92.

Should the o erator become aware of a holdup, before the command hands up is given, the signal may be set in operation by merely pressing the arms against the body for shifting the covers 66 to bridge the tubes 30 and the contacts 50. Such pressure may be imparted to the switch devices I4 without betraying any bodily movement indicative of any warning intent on the part of the operator. Similarly, the signal may be set in operation by raising one arm and pressing the other arm against the body.

While I have illustrated the switch devices I4 as being attached to the garment I0, the devices may be strapped to the arms. In such cases the strap I6 will perform no function other than as a housing for the wires 56 and 58. Thus, the switch devices I4 may be attached to the person regardless of the use of any particular garment.

The switch devices I4 are relatively small in proportion and are so shaped as to permit free and easy arm movement. The devices are light in weight and are not apparent to the eye when mounted in the manner described.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully explain my invention that others may, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.

I claim:

1. In an alarm system, the combination of an alarm circuit including an alarm device, switch supporting means for connection with the arms of an operator, a pair of gravity responsive switches carried by said switch supporting means and connected with said alarm circuit, said gravity responsive switches being closed when the operators arms are raised, to close said alarm circuit, and a pair of pressure operated switches carried by said switch supporting means between the operators body and arms, to be closed when the operators arms are pressed against the body for closing the alarm circuit in the open position of the gravity responsive switches, the pressure responsive switch on one arm being connected in series with the gravity responsive switch on the other arm so that the alarm circuit will be closed when either arm is raised and the other arm pressed against the operators body.

2. In an alarm system, the combination of an alarm circuit including an alarm device, switch supporting means for connection with the arms of an operator, a pair of gravity responsive switches carried by said switch supporting means and connected with said alarm circuit, said gravity responsive switches being closed when the operators arms are raised, to close said alarm circuit, a pair of pressure operated switches carried by said switch supporting means between the operators body and arms, to be closed when the operators arms are pressed against the body for closing the alarm circuit in the open position of the gravity responsive switches, the pressure responsive switch on one arm being connected in series with the gravity responsive switch on the other arm so that the alarm circuit will be closed when either arm is raised and the other arm pressed against the operators body, and means for maintaining the alarm circuit closed upon momentary closing of said alarm circuit by two of said switches.

ALEXANDER J. RAKOS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720327 *May 31, 1952Oct 11, 1955Charles K BainRemote control for mucking process
US3067455 *May 28, 1958Dec 11, 1962Standard Products CoApparatus for making a window pane supporting and/or guiding structure
US3440635 *Jun 28, 1965Apr 22, 1969Harris B HullPolice alarm
US3868573 *Apr 23, 1973Feb 25, 1975Jack HolcombShoulder holster communication device
US3885576 *Sep 23, 1974May 27, 1975Habi Chek CorpWrist band including a mercury switch to induce an electric shock
US4041394 *Jul 6, 1976Aug 9, 1977River Range Developments LimitedRadio control transmitter
US4315111 *May 29, 1980Feb 9, 1982Thomas Charles AHearing aid with remote momentary shut off switch
US4743028 *Mar 26, 1985May 10, 1988Keith HarrisonGolf swing practice device
US5963151 *Feb 2, 1995Oct 5, 1999Hubbard; Rayford C.Bus stop call system
US6642467 *Jul 11, 2001Nov 4, 2003Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Electrical switch for use in garments
US7476102Jun 9, 2006Jan 13, 2009Maples Paul DContamination avoiding device
DE1281319B *Nov 22, 1966Oct 24, 1968Alfred GrotjahnAls Kleinstsender ausgebildeter Notrufmelder
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/574, 200/52.00R, 200/DIG.200, 200/85.00R
International ClassificationH01H35/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S200/02, H01H35/003
European ClassificationH01H35/00B