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Publication numberUS2106895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1938
Filing dateOct 28, 1936
Priority dateOct 28, 1936
Publication numberUS 2106895 A, US 2106895A, US-A-2106895, US2106895 A, US2106895A
InventorsLe Coq Martha W, Le Coq William I
Original AssigneeLe Coq Martha W, Le Coq William I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment pattern
US 2106895 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. I, 1938. l. LE coo ET AL. 2,106,895

GARMENT PATTERN Filed 0d, 28, 1956 w ECTIONS FOR usme L FRONT or mouse co M PL ETE SLEEYE 'Sswmrr INSTRUCTIQN} INVENTOBS jllarllza Wle'a .AND

ATTORNEY.

Patented Feb. 1, 1938 UNITE STATES GARMENT PATTERN William 1. Le Coq and Martha W. Le Philadelphia Pa.

Application October 28-, 1936, Serial No. 107,952

4 Claims.

Our invention relates to patterns for guidance in cutting and assembling fabrics into completed garments. Patterns of this nature in the prior art have long presented problems in their use,

5 which have rendered their utilization cumbersome and, very often, undesirable for the layman.

Thus, the prior art patterns generally comprise a large quantity of patterns of constituent segments of the garment to be made, either separately disposed, or positioned side-by-side on an unwieldy and capacious sheet; thereby providing a bulk of numerous, vari-configurated pattern forms having little indication of their relation to one another, and offering virtually no aid to the cutter in determining the proper cutting sequence, or even Where to begin.

The correct determination of the proper cutting sequence is of utmost importance; for without it, there is a considerable wastage of fabric; and the cutter often finds that a given piece of goods which would have been enough for the garment, if a proper cutting sequence had been followed, is not sufiicient after the cutting operation has been entered into; and a large amount of scraps is left over.

Moreover, in the prior art, the plethora of separate pattern forms render it necessary, in order expediently to pack and ship them, to make them of lightweight and very thin tissue, and to fold them into tight but necessarily bulky packages. Thus, the fiimsy, creased, and vari-configurated tissue sheets entail considerable delicacy, as well as tend to confusion in unpacking and assembling the pattern segments for use. Furthermore, it is often necessary to pick up and examine both sides of the numerous pattern segments in order to find any desired one, for it is almost impossible to visualize at a glance all the garment segments during the cutting opertion. Also, once out, it is diificult in the prior art, to determine the proper segment edges to be sewn to each other.

It is an object of our invention, therefore, to provide a garment pattern in which all the pattern forms are so disposed that they may be visualized and respectively identified at a glance, during the cutting operation.

It is another object of our invention to provide a garment pattern, the pattern forms of which are so disposed that the starting point of the cutting operation, is readily recognizable, and each succeeding step of the cutting and assembling procedure is progressively indicated as the preceding one is completed, until the garment is finally assembled.

Av further object ofifour invention is to provide a garment pattern in which the constituent gar-. ment segment portions aresorelated that compliance with a proper cutting sequence is assured.

Another object of .our invention is to provide a garment pattern which, maybe made of strong, substantial-thickness material, and yet require a very small space for its packaging and shipping.

With the aboveand other objects in view, our invention consists ofagarment pattern comprising aseverable sheet having delineated thereon a series. of garment segments disposed in nested relation to ,each other, the portion of the garment to be first out, being disposed at the outer portion of said nest; the portion of the garment next to be out, being disposed within and next to saidfirst-mentioned portion; and the then next portion of the garment-to. be cut, being disposed within-and next -to said second-mentioned portion. 7

Our inventionalso consists of the method of making a garment, comprisingv the provision of a garment fabric, and of a garment pattern comprising a dismemberable sheethaving delineated thereon a'series of constituent. garment segment forms in nested relation to each other, theportions, of said garment segments to be, sewn to each other being. indicated by correlated identifying markers delineated thereon; positioning the delineated outer segment. form on .said fabric and cutting the fabric in. accordance with said delineation; severing the identifying markers on said outer. segment form from. said pattern and securingthe severed, markers to the cut fabric in the same relativeposition as they occupied on saidpatterng. removing the outer segment form from said vnest, and positioning the next outer segment delineation on the remainder of the fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance with said delineation; severing the identifying markers on said last-mentioned delineation from said pattern and securing said markers on the cut fabric last-mentioned, in the same relative position as they occupied on said pattern; removing the last-mentioned outer segment form from the nest, and positioning the next outer segment delineation on the'remainder of the fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance with said delineation; severing theidentifying markers on said last-mentioned delineation from said pattern, and securing said. markers on the cut fabric lastmentioned, in the same relative position as they occupied on said pattern; and sewing together the edges of the cut fabrics, which have secured thereto correlatedmarkers.

Our invention also consists of various combinations of the individual characteristics of our invention as will appear more fully hereinafter.

For the purpose of illustrating our invention, we have shown in the accompanying drawing forms thereof which are at present preferred by us, since the same have been found in practice to give satisfactory and reliable results, although it is to be understood that the various instrumentalities of which our invention consists can be variously arranged and organized and that our invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and organizations of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

Referring to the drawing, in which like reference characters indicate like parts.

Figure 1 represents a plan view of a garment pattern of our invention.

Figure 2 represents a perspective view of the fabric and garment pattern, at one stage of our invention, illustrating the cut fabric for one garment segment, with the sewing-edge markers secured thereto; and the garment pattern in process of having removed therefrom the segment form just used, thereby bringing the next succeeding segment form, according to the proper cutting sequence, into condition for use.

In accordance with our invention, we provide a severable or dismemberable sheet 5, preferably of paper of substantial strength and texture, and of generally rectangular configuration, although the outer configuration of the paper may, if desired, be that of the first garment segment to be cut.

' The proper cutting sequence for ensuring economy of fabric, is generally that in which the largest garment segment is cut first, then the next largest, and so on, until the last garment segment is cut. Accordingly, we delineate on said sheet 5, the outline 6 of the largest garment segment which may be cut at one time. In the drawing, we have illustrated this portion as being the front of the blouse together with the complete sleeve which, in the case of the garment pattern illustrated, is formed integrally with the blouse.

When the garment segment is excessively large, we may divide the pattern form into two or more parts and provide means for their conjunction when in use. Thus in the drawing, we have illustrated the pattern form for the front of blouse and sleeve portion of the garment, as being in two parts, I and 8, which are adapted to be joined together along the lines 9 and [0 by means of pinning, or by a suitable cement being applied on their respective marginsv H and I2, and the margins lapped one upon another, to form one continuous pattern.

Moreover, where the symmetry of the garment segment permits, and where it does not conflict with the proper cutting sequence, we also prefer to delineate but one of two bilaterally symmetrical sides of the segment. Thus, the delineation 6 comprises the perimeter l3 and central axis ll of the conjoint garment segment 15.

A series of similar identifying marks 16 is placed along the central axis 14 to indicate to the operator that the fabric is to be folded about the central axis I4, and not out there. Thus, in operation, the cutter folds the fabric I! about the central axis M of the conjoint delineation 6, and cuts the doubled fabric along the perimeter 13 until the first garment segment is out out. The operator is thereby enabled to cut the comof the skirt.

plete garment segment while only tracing the outline of half the segment with her scissors.

Within the periphery 6 of the first garment segment form I5 we delineate the form [8 of the next largest constituent garment segment l9, which is illustrated in the drawing as being the front of the skirt.

Similarly, within the periphery of the front of the skirt portion Hi, we delineate the form 20 of the next largest garment segment 2|, which is illustrated in the drawing as being the back Likewise, within the periphery 20 of the back of the skirt portion 2 I, we delineate the form 22 of the next largest constituent garment section 23, which is illustrated in the drawing as being the back of the blouse. Also, within the periphery of the back of the blouse portion, 22, we delineate the form 23 of the next largest constituent garment segment 24, which is illustrated in the drawing as being the collar. Further, within the periphery 6 of the smaller part 8 of the divided front of the blouse portion l5, we delineate the form 25 of the smallest garment segment, which is illustrated in the drawing as being the cuff. There is thus formed a series of nested garment segment forms beginning with the largest, 6, and ending with the smallest, 23 and 25.

Identifying signals or markers 26 are delineated in proximity to the edges of each segment form corresponding to the edges of the segment which are to be sewn to another. These signals 26 contain within their perimeters, or have formed integrally therewith suitable indicia 21 which serve to identify with each other the edges with which they are associated; thereby enabling the garment-maker to identify the edges which are to be sewn to each other.

Thus, the edge 28 of the back of blouse form 22 has associated with it the delineated signal 26 having as its index 21 the letter B. Likewise, the edge l3 of the front of blouse form 6 has associated with it at one part thereof, the delineated signal 26' having as its index 27 the letter B. This indicates that the two edges bearing the letter B are to be sewed to each other.

Instructions 29 for using the pattern of our novel invention, and a cutting diagram 30 illustrating the positioning of the segment forms on the fabric l1, according to the proper cutting sequence, are disposed on said sheet 5, preferably outside the garment segment form 6.

In operation, the garment-maker severe the largest garment segment form 6 and 6 from the severable sheet 5, by means of cutting; or in the case of a perforated sheet, by tearing. The divided portions 1 and 8 of the garment form 6 are then joined together in the manner hereinbefore described, and the conjoint segment form 6 is positioned on the fabric in accordance with the cutting diagram 30. The garment maker folds the fabric about the central axis [4 and then cuts the fabric along the delineated perimeter I3 of the garment segment l5, preferably leaving a space of approximately one-half inch for a seam allowance. The signals 26 in proximity to the edge 6 are then severed therefrom and pinned to the corresponding edges of the cut fabric.

The garment-maker then severs the next largest segment form l8 of the garment segment I9, from the segment form 6, positions the form I8 on the uncut portion of the fabric in accordance with the cutting diagram 30; and cuts the fabric along the outer edge of the form 6, preferably leaving space for a seam allowance. The signals 26 associated with the edge I8 are then severed from the pattern and secured to the corresponding edges of the cut fabric.

The garment-maker then similarly removes the garment segment portion I9 from the pattern, by cutting or tearing along the delineated form 20 of the next largest garment segment 2|, substantially as illustrated in Figure 2. The cutting, marking and used segment form-removing operations are then repeated until the last garment segment is cut and marked. The operator then sews together the edges of the segments which are identified by similar indicia onthe signals secured to them; discards the signals, and the garment is complete.

If desired, elemental segment forms may be delineated, with instructions "to add specified lengths according to the size of the wearer. A table for this purpose may be included among the instructions.

It will readily be seen that by the use of our novel invention, compliance with a proper cutting sequence is assured, for there is available for the use of the operator but one garment segment at a time; and that one is chosen, according to a predetermined cutting sequence, in the original nesting of the segment forms.

Also, by the use of our novel invention, inter alia, it is possible to dispose a complete set of patterns for the making of a garment, in. a modicum of space. Thus, there is rendered available for distribution as part of newspapers or magazines a complete set of garment patterns in accordance with our invention.

We are aware that the invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and we therefore desire the present embodiments to be considered in all respects as illustrative and .not restrictive, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having thus described our invention, what We claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. A pattern for a garment, comprising a severable sheet having delineated thereon a series of pattern outlines of constituent segments of the garment, in nested relation, one within the outline of another.

2. A pattern for a garment, comprising a severable sheet having delineated thereon a series of pattern outlines of segments of the garment, in nested relation, one within the outline of another, said segments being adapted to be sewed to each other, according to a predetermined design, and signals bearing similar indicia in proximity to the delineated edges corresponding to the edges of said segments which are adapted to be sewed to each other.

3. The method of making garments comprising the provision of a fabric, and of a garment pattern comprising a dismemberable sheet having delineated thereon a plurality of nested garment segment forms nested one within the outline of another; positioning the outer form on said fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance therewith; removing the outer segment form from. said nest; and positioning the next outer segment form on said fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance therewith.

4. The method of making garments comprising the provision of a fabric, and of a garment pattern comprising a dismemberable sheet having delineated thereon a plurality of nested forms of garment segments adapted tobe sewed to each other according to a. predetermined design, and signals bearing similar indicia in proximity to the delineated edges corresponding to the edges of said segments which are adapted to be sewed to each other; positioning the outer form on said fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance therewith; removing the outer form from said nest, severing the signals in proximity to the outer form and securing them to the cut fabric in the same relative position as they occupied on said form; positioning the next outer form on said fabric and cutting said fabric in accordance therewith, severing the signals in proximity to the next outer form and securing them to the next cut fabric in the same relative position as they occupied on said form; and sewing together the edges r of the cut fabric bearing similar signal indicia.

MARTHA W. LE COQ. WM. I. LE COQ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2872729 *Jul 26, 1954Feb 10, 1959Pullman Standard Car Mfg CoCar roof assembly method
US4642896 *Dec 27, 1982Feb 17, 1987Grimm Susan PSewing aid
US20100132090 *Nov 30, 2009Jun 3, 2010Tae Bok ParkKorean-Style Woman Jacket Design Method
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/12
International ClassificationA41H3/06, A41H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H3/06
European ClassificationA41H3/06