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Publication numberUS2107598 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1938
Filing dateOct 11, 1935
Priority dateOct 11, 1935
Publication numberUS 2107598 A, US 2107598A, US-A-2107598, US2107598 A, US2107598A
InventorsJr William Colvin
Original AssigneeJr William Colvin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rug or carpet
US 2107598 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. COLVIN JR Feb. 8, 1938.

RUG ORA CARPET Filed Oct. 1l, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet l 2e 3m i WHY/ Tam Cfr/wha??? Feb. 8, 1938. w COLWN, JR 2,107,598

RUG OR CARPET Filed oct. 1'1, 1935 f s sheets-sheet 2 5543 MyW Chime/1J Feb. 8, 1938. w. coLvlN, JR

RUG on CARPET Filed Oct. 11A 1935 sov Patented F eb. 8, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE William Colvin, Jr., Troy, N. Y. Application October 1l, 1935, Serial No. 44,628

11 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in rugs or carpets.

Objects of the invention are to provide an improved rug or carpet provided with electrical means for heating the same; to provide an improved iioor covering of this character in which the heating elements are so located in the woven body of the covering as to eiiiciently heat the same and to be protected, and which will be of durable, efficient, satisfactory construction that can be produced at low cost.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved floor covering of the character referred to, which while providing the desired heat will not have any harmful eifect upon varnished floor surfaces.

The invention, with other objects and advantages thereof, and the particular construction, combination and arrangement of parts comprising the same, will be understood from the hereinafter contained detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming part hereof and illustrating one embodiment of the invention.

In 'the drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a rug made in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a side edge elevation.

Fig. 3 isa fragmentary longitudinal section. Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic plan view of the woven body of the rug.

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic warp-wise sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 4.

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic sectional view taken on the line 6 6 of Figure 5.

Fig. 7 is a greatly magnified view of one of the i composite metal and textile fiber threads of the rug. Y p

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic view showing the grouping and connections of the wire cores of the composite threads that `form the electrical heating element for the rug.

While a specific embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the drawings, it will be understood that changes and modifications may be made in the particular construction shown, and the invention may be embodied in other forms as will appeal to those skilled in the art and falling within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In providing my improved oor covering, I employ with the usual textile threads composed entirely of textile fiber, thread of the construction disclosed in my Patent No, 1,965,542 dated (Cl. 21S-48) July 3, 1934, composed partially of wire and partiallyof textile fibers, the composite thread being woven` with the usual textile fiber threads and forming part of the woven structure of the floor covering, and the wire cores of the composite 5 threads being connected and utilized as an electrical heating element for the floor covering.

Referring to a detailed description of the particular embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, the construction shown com- 10 prises body warp threads I, 2, extending substantially in straight linesl weft threads 3, 4, disposed respectively above and below the body warp threads i, 2, and binder warp threads 5 alternately passing over the upper weft threads l5 3 and under the lower weft threads 4, the body warp threads i and the binder warp threads being shown arranged in pairs. Between pairs of the body warp threads i and binder warp threads 5 are pile tufts 6. each looped under one of the 20 upper weft threads 3 with its end portions extending upwardly above the same. 'I'he body warps i, binder warps 5, weft threads 3, 4, and pile tufts 6, are textile ber threads. The threads 2 are the composite threads hereinbefore mentioned. In the particular exemplification ofthe invention illustrated in the drawings, every sixth thread in the warp of the woven structure is a composite thread, but it will be understood that the number of composite threads 2 ern- 30 ployed may 'be varied as desired. These composite threads, it will be noted, are disposed between the upper and lower weft threads 3, 4, alongside body warns l and the loop or base portions of the tufts 6. 35 As shown in Figure 7 of the drawings, each of the threads 2 comprises a iine easily flexible metal Wire core ia having a ilexible insulating coating of enamel ib and enclosed in two layers of wrappings I0, id, of fibrous material such as 40 threads of silk, wool, cotton or the like, the Wrappings of thread lbeing relatively disposed on the core so as to overcome any tendency of the composite thread to kink or snarl when used in a Weaving machine. 'I'he wire cores of the 45 threads may be made of copper, irons, low carbon steels or any other suitable metal or metal alloys. 'I'he wire cores of the threads 2 are connected to form an electrical heating element. As illustrated diagrammatically in Figure 8 of the 50 drawings, the wire cores of groups of adjacent threads are connected together at their ends, and the adjacent groups of connected wire cores are in turn connected with each other at their ends. The number of wire cores connected in multiple 55 may be varied to best accomplish the desired results, depending upon the size of the wire cores, the size of the rug or carpet and the amount of heat required. In connecting the groups of wire cores, the fiber wrappings I, Id, and enamel coatings are removed from the end portions thereof, and the bared end portions twisted together and solder applied. The connected end portions of the wire cores are then wrapped with insulating tape l or other practical insulating material and folded back upon the under side of the woven body. As shown in Figure 3, they are enclosed in binding strips 8 suitably secured to the ends of the woven body of the rug, said binding strips being in turn overlaid and concealed by suitably attached fringes 9. i0 designates a flexible conductor cord electrically connected with the terminals Il, i2, of the heating element for connecting the same to a source of electrical energy.

On the underside of the woven body is a backing or pad i3 of asbestos cloth or other heat insulating material such as hair felt. This heat insulating backing, which is cemented or otherwise suitably secured to the woven body, assists in securing the full effects of the heating element upon the upper part of the woven body of the rug, and serves to prevent injury to varnished floor surfaces in the use of the rug.

It will be noted that the invention provides a woven oor covering having an electrical heating element forming a part of the woven structure thereof and in which the heating element is so disposed therein as to eiiiciently heat the same and to be protected. The construction provided is of a durable, efficient, satisfactory nature, and can be :produced at low cost.

What l claim is:

1. A woven floor covering having a portion of the warp thereof composed of wire threads, groups of said threads being connected together attheir ends, and the groups of connected threads being in turn connected to each other at their ends to form an electrical heating element,` and a heat insulating backing secured on the underside of the woven body, the connected end portions of the wire threads being folded back against the underside of the woven body and disposed between the same and the heat insulating backing.

2. A woven fioor covering including body warp threads, weft threads disposed above the body warp threads, weft threads disposed below the body warp threads, binder Warp threads alternately passing over the upper weft threads and under the lower weft threads, and pile tufts each looped under one of the upper weft threads with its end portions extending upwardly above the same, said body and binder warp threads, weft threads and pile tufts each being textile fiber threads, and warp threads extending parallel with said first mentioned body warp threads, each having an easily flexible metal wire core enclosed in wrappings of textile thread, the wire cores of a plurality of said threads being connected and constituting an electrical heating element.

3. A woven floor covering including body warp threads, weft threads disposed above the body warp threads, weft threads disposed below the body warp threads, binder warp threads alternately passing over the upper weft threads and under the lower weft threads, and pile tufts each looped under one of the upper weft threads lwith its end portions extending upwardly above the same, said body and binder warp threads, weft threads and pile tufts each being textile fiber threads, and warp threads extending parallel with said first mentioned body warp threads, each having an easily flexible metal wire core enclosed in wrapplngs of textile thread, the wire cores of a plurality of said threads being oonnected and constituting an electrical heating element, and a heat insulating backing secured on the underside of the woven body.

4. As a new article of manufacture, a rug comprising a Wear resisting heat insulating base member adapted to rest on a door, an interlaced fabric and electrically conducting heating unit on the upper surface of said base member and secured thereto, and tufts associated and correlated therewith with the spaces between the tufts open to the interlaced fabric whereby the heat will pass into and upwardly through and around said tufts from the relatively exposed upper face of the heating unit.

5. As a new article of manufacture, a rug comprising a wear resisting heat insulating base member adapted to rest on a iioor, an interlaced fabric and electrically conducting heating unit on the upper surface of said base member and secured thereto, and tufts associated and correlated therewith with the spaces between the tufts open to the interlaced fabric whereby the heat will pass into and upwardly through and around said tufts from the relatively exposed upper face of the heating unit, in combination with edge binding strip portions for said heating unit.

6. As a' new article of manufacture, a rug comprising a wear resisting heat insulating base member adapted to rest on a floor, an interlaced fabric and electrically conducting heating unit on the upper surface of said base member and 'secured thereto, and tufts associated and correlated therewith with the spaces between the tufts open to the interlaced fabric whereby the heat will pass into and upwardly through and around said tufts from the relatively exposed upper face of the heating unit, in combination with edge binding strip portions for said heating unit, said binding strip portions having under edge portions secured to said base portion.

7. As a new article of manufacture, a rug comprising a wear resisting heat insulating base member adapted to rest on a floor, an interlaced fabric and electrically conducting heating unit on the upper surface of said base member and secured thereto, and tufts associated and correlated therewith whereby the heat will pass into and upwardly through said tufts from the relatively exposed upper face of the heating unit, in

combination with edge binding strip portions for said heating unit, and decorative fringe portions secured to and concealing said binding strip portions.

8. As a new article of manufacture, a rugcomprising a wear 'resisting heat insulating base member adapted to rest on a floor, an interlaced fabric and electrically conducting heating unit on the upper surface of said base member and secured thereto, and tufts associated and correlated therewith with the spaces between the tufts open to the interlaced fabric whereby the heat will pass into and upwardly through and around said tufts from the relatively exposed upper face of the heating unit, in combination with decorative fringe portions extending from the outer tufts over and concealing the edge portions of the heating unit.

composed of wire threads connected together to form an electrical heating element, in combination with an edge binding strip portion for the heating element, the binding strip portionhaving an underlying fold, and end portions of the wire threads being folded back and disposed between the underlying fold of the binding strip portion and said heating element. y

11. A floor covering having a portion thereof composed of Wire threads connected together to form an electrical heating element, and an underlying part, end portions of the wire threads being folded back and disposed between the 10 underlying part and the heating element.

4 WILLIAM COLVIN, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2432785 *Jan 8, 1945Dec 16, 1947Ivar O MobergElectrically heated two-ply blanket
US2496108 *Apr 9, 1947Jan 31, 1950Steele Maurice GElectric conductor extension cord
US2511540 *Aug 24, 1946Jun 13, 1950Mcgraw Electric CoRoom heater
US2719213 *Jul 21, 1949Sep 27, 1955Johnson Oliver FHeat shield
US2771537 *Jun 4, 1954Nov 20, 1956Morris D LichtensteinThermal floor covering
US3288912 *Sep 17, 1964Nov 29, 1966Hussey Ray WCarpets wired for sound
US3472289 *Nov 10, 1966Oct 14, 1969Brunswick CorpHeater fabric
US3597585 *Aug 25, 1969Aug 3, 1971Masaichi OhnoTube mat
US5451743 *Nov 17, 1992Sep 19, 1995Denel (Pty) Limited T/A NaschemHeating tile
US7038177Sep 2, 2004May 2, 2006Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US20110068098 *Nov 24, 2010Mar 24, 2011Taiwan Textile Research InstituteElectric Heating Yarns, Methods for Manufacturing the Same and Application Thereof
CN101555648BApr 7, 2009Mar 13, 2013圣豪纺织机械有限公司Weaving method for making a heating textile web and heating textile web
EP2108724A1 *Mar 31, 2009Oct 14, 2009Schönherr Textilmaschinenbau GmbH.Weaving method for making a heating textile web and heating textile web
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/528, 219/545, 219/201, 139/425.00R, 139/401, 174/117.00M
International ClassificationH05B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/342, H05B2203/026, H05B2203/017, H05B2203/015
European ClassificationH05B3/34B