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Publication numberUS2108236 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1938
Filing dateNov 13, 1936
Priority dateNov 13, 1936
Publication numberUS 2108236 A, US 2108236A, US-A-2108236, US2108236 A, US2108236A
InventorsHenry Scott
Original AssigneeHenry Scott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger exercising device
US 2108236 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. SCOTT Feb. 15, 19380 EXERCISING DEVICE FINGER Filed NOV. 13. 1956 ATTORN EY Patented Feb. 15, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 9 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in finger exercising methods and devices to develop the muscles and the agility of fingers for playing instruments like the pianoforte or operating devices like the typewriter.

In accordance with the present invention the naturally least developed finger of one hand is impeded to a certain extent to perform a required movement, and the corresponding finger of the other hand is impeded to a greater extent. Usually, the third finger of the right hand is by nature least able to perform the work it is called upon to do in playing the piano or the like. The third finger of the left hand is, in a right-handed person, even less endowed. By impeding the upand-down movement of the right third finger during piano playing practice, the muscles of this finger will be rapidly developed so that the natural handicap of this finger will soon be overcome. Similarly, the greater impedance to the movements of the left third finger will, within a short time, develop it to be substantially equal to the right third finger.

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, a mitten is provided for each hand. For a right-handed person the left mitten is thicker, heavier, or less elastic than the right mitten, so that in practicing, the fingers of the left hand will have to work harder than those of the right hand, and the fingers of both hands will have to work much harder than in the normal playing of the piano. Furthermore, that portion of each mitten against which the third finger strikes is less yielding than the other portions, whereby this finger must in practice work much harder than the other fingers.

In order more fully to explain the nature of my invention a few embodiments thereof will be explained in connection with the drawing, in which:

Figs. 1 and 2 are side elevations of two embodiments of the invention.

As shown in Fig. 1, the covering for impeding the movement of the fingers consists of a mitten l of knitted wool or other resilient material. That portion of the mitten with which the tip of the fingers contact when in position to play the piano is divided into panels of varying resiliency. As indicated in the drawing, panel 2 with which the first finger cooperates, is most resilient; i. e., it impedes the up-and-down movement of the finger the least. Panels 3 and 4, with which the second finger and the little finger cooperate, are

somewhat less resilient, the resiliency of the two panels being substantially alike, since the natural agility of these two fingers is usually the same. Panel 5, with which the third and least agile finger cooperates, is the least resilient, so that this finger will, in order to strike the piano keys, have to perform a relatively greater amount of work than the other fingers, and its muscles will thus be developed rapidly enough to bring it to a par with the other fingers.

The variable resiliency of portions of the mitten can be produced in any one of a number of ways. The knitting may be looser at one point than at another, stitches may be dropped or heavier or less resilient yarn used in the knitting of one section than in the other. Also, the relative variations may be changed, the important point being that the finger which is naturally least endowed encounter the greatest obstacle and, therefore, develop the fastest. The covering for the thumb 6 may have any resiliency, since the thumb is usually very strong.

The width of the mitten should preferably be such that when the four fingers are spread into the playing position the panels 2 to 5 will be stretched out so that each finger will encounter and press against the panels. 5

Fig. 1 shows the mitten for the left hand. For a right-handed person the mitten for the right hand will be like the mitten for the left hand, but each panel will be more resilient than the corresponding panel of the left mitten, since the right-hand fingers are naturally better developed and a greater handicap must be placed on the left hand to bring it up to the development of the right hand.

Fig. 2 illustrates another arrangement to attain the purposes of my invention. As shown in this figure, a covering is provided for each finger;

H] for the first finger, H for the second finger; I 2 for the third finger, and I I for the little finger. To these finger covers are fastened bands of resilient material [5 such as knitted Wool, rubber or the like. These bands I 5 are fastened to a wrist strap It by means of adjustable buckles H. The wrist strap l6 may be fastened around the wrist by means of buttons I8. The bands I5 are held together by means of a strap l9.

In this structure the resiliency of the bands l5 may be varied in the same manner as the resiliency of the panels 2 to 5 are varied, and thus when the fingers are in playing position and the straps P5 are stretched out on the top of the players hand over the knuckles, as each finger plays it will encounter greater or less resilience, depending upon the elasticity of its restraining band l5. Also, by means of the buckles II, the player may vary the resilience of the associated band and adjust the device to suit the weaknesses of his hand. Here also, for righthanded persons, the device for the right hand will be adjusted so as to restrain the fingers less than the device for the left hand, and the third finger will be obliged to do the heaviest work.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the invention may be subjected to numerous modifications. In the device shown in Fig. 2, fingers may be left off. For instance, if all of a players fingers except the third is well developed, then only a restraining device for the third finger will be provided. Also, a device or any part of the device shown in Fig. 2, may be used in conjunction with the mitten shown in Fig. 1. In other words, the mitten of Fig. 1 may be pulled on the hand after the device of Fig. 2 has been attached, and thus the fingers doubly restrained; or any part of the device of Fig. 2 may be provided on the hand of the player before he slips on the mitten. In this case, finger cover 12, for instance, may be sewn inside the mitten I, and the mitten need not be provided with panels of Varying resiliency.

What is claimed is:

1. In a finger exercising device, a covering for one hand at least partly but loosely surrounding the fingers, impedances of different magnitudes to impede the required movements of the fingers, the impedance to the movement of the finger that is naturally least apt being greatest, and a similar covering for the other hand with the impedances impeding to a greater extent the required movements of the fingers.

2. The device defined in claim 1 and in which the covering consists of a mitten covering the tips of the fingers, one portion of which is more yielding than another.

3. A device according to claim 1 and in which the covering consists of a mitten covering the tips of the fingers, and the wall of which differs in resiliency under the different fingers.

4. A device according to claim 1 and in which the impedance in the covering of one hand impedes the third finger at its tip to a greater extent than the other fingers, and the impedance in the covering of the other hand impedes the third finger at its tip to a greater extent than the impedance of the third finger of the first mentioned hand.

5. In a finger exercising device, means attached to the player for impeding at its tip the required movement of one finger of one hand to a certain extent, and means attached to the player for impeding at its tip the required movement of the corresponding finger of the other hand to a greater extent.

6. The device according to claim 5 and in which the first mentioned means includes means variably to impede at their tips the required movements of the fingers of one hand to a certain extent, and the second mentioned means includes means variably to impede at their tips the movements of the fingers of the second hand to a greater extent.

'7. The device according to claim 5 and in which means are provided to vary the resiliency of said means attached to the player at the will of the operator.

8. In a device for exercising the fingers to play the keys of digitally operable mechanisms, a covering for one hand at least partly but loosely surrounding the fingers, impedances of different magnitude to impede at the tips the movement of the fingers towards the keys, the impedance to the movement of the finger that is least apt being greatest, and a similar covering for the other hand with impedances impeding at the tips the movement of the fingers toward the keys to a greater extent.

9. In a device for exercising the fingers to play the keys of digitally operable mechanisms, means attached to the player for impeding at the tip the movement towards the keys of one finger of one hand to a certain extent, and means attached to the player for impeding at the tip the movement towards the keys of the corresponding fingers of the other hand to a greater extent.

HENRY SCOTT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2736034 *Dec 29, 1951Feb 28, 1956 Finger exercising glove
US3062546 *May 11, 1961Nov 6, 1962Horton Jonathan EBowling ball release guide
US3944220 *Feb 27, 1975Mar 16, 1976Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Glove and hand exerciser
US4220334 *Jun 22, 1978Sep 2, 1980Maruho Co., Ltd.Separable type elastic finger rehabilitation device
US4830360 *Jul 24, 1987May 16, 1989Carr Jr Earnest FOrthopedic exercise glove
US5113849 *Apr 2, 1991May 19, 1992Kuiken Paul AFinger extender
US5145229 *Oct 15, 1991Sep 8, 1992Romain MetzgerBowling ball holder
US5447490 *Jul 21, 1994Sep 5, 1995Smith & Nephew Rolyan, Inc.Finger rehabilitation system
US5453064 *Jul 31, 1992Sep 26, 1995Natraflex Systems, Inc.Exercise glove incorporating rods which offer resistance to movement of fingers, hands, or wrists
US5456650 *Nov 12, 1993Oct 10, 1995Natraflex Systems, Inc.Ergonomic exercising and bracing device
US5514052 *Feb 24, 1994May 7, 1996Charles; GeneFinger exerciser
US5820522 *Apr 23, 1997Oct 13, 1998Taylor-Nathan Co., Inc.Orthopaedic gripping device
US6059694 *Jun 15, 1998May 9, 2000Villepigue; JamesHand exerciser employing finger power bands
US7273463 *Dec 8, 2003Sep 25, 2007Priore Allan TDynamic gauntlet
US7537577 *Jul 5, 2006May 26, 2009Carolyn Hoyne PhelanLow-profile, radial nerve splint with interchangeable resilient digit extensor elements and supination adjustment means
US7740561 *Jun 27, 2006Jun 22, 2010Scott KupfermanHand exercising device
US8702634Jun 1, 2012Apr 22, 2014Wiltse Parker CromptonModular upper extremity support system
US20050124464 *Dec 8, 2003Jun 9, 2005Priore Allan T.Dynamic gauntlet and related method of use
US20120028737 *Feb 2, 2012Richard HunsickerGolf glove with grip pressure reducing means
US20140287882 *Mar 20, 2013Sep 25, 2014Michael BarnerTherapeutic Gloves
WO2008002617A2 *Jun 27, 2007Jan 3, 2008Clinically Fit IncHand exercising device
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/48, 473/61, 84/468
International ClassificationA63B23/16, A61F5/01, A63B23/035, A61F5/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63B23/16, A61F5/10
European ClassificationA61F5/10, A63B23/16