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Publication numberUS2108616 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1938
Filing dateApr 12, 1935
Publication numberUS 2108616 A, US 2108616A, US-A-2108616, US2108616 A, US2108616A
InventorsVincent J. Schaefer
Original AssigneeGeneral Electric Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Treatment of materials
US 2108616 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Feb. 15, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE New York Electric Company, a corporation of No Application April 12, 1935, Serial No. 16,036

10 Claims. (01. 91-68) The present'invention relates to the treatment of materials designed to makethem non-wettable by oil and to improve their oil-resistance. The invention is more particularly directed to an improved method whereby metallic and nonmetallic surfaces may be provided with a him or films which will prevent the spreading or creeping of. oil on the surface treated. It is also directed to an improved means whereby a barrier 10 to oil may be presented on a surface or within 'materials which normally permit oil, moisture, etc. to be absorbed by capillary or other action. In a copending application filed of even date herewith in the name of Katherine Blodgett, 1 serial No. 16,033,, and assigned to the assignee of the present invention, there is set forth and claimed means wherebysurfaces may be rendered non-wettable byoii. This Blodgett application discloses that surfaces may be treated for the prevention of oil creepage or oil spreading by providing thereon a film or films of a long chain organic compound so positionedon the surface to be treated that the exposed portion of the molecules on the outside layer presents a groupa' ing non-wettable by oil.

The present invention is designed to improve the practicability of application of the film to the surface to be treated. It has been found possible to incorporate the material which eventually acts an as the non-wettable film, into vehicles such as varnishes and lacquers. For example, from 1 to 10% by weight of ferric stearate have been incorporated into varnishes, and in addition to providing a non-wettable film, it has been found that the oil and water resistant qualities have been improved. Also, for example, the addition of 5% of calcium stearate by weight to a high grade sparvarnish produces a non-wettable film with a much higher heat resistance than had been characteristic of films containing ferric stearate;

It will be apparent that such vehicles provide a practical product which may be used for dipping, brushing, or spraying to give a durable surface over which oil will not creep. Moreover,

5 such surfaces will withstand a temperature of 100 C.

Besides ferric stearate' and calcium stearate,

other metallic soaps, for example, lead stearate,

barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate have been successfully used.

One precaution must be observed in employing the varnish as a vehicle for the non-wettable film material. The latter must be carefully washed, as thoroughly dried and blended with the varnish before there is any chance for moisture to get into the material. Also a high grade of varnish, free from moisture, is also necessary to produce good fllms.

In addition to the provision of such nonwettable films as has been described to prevent the creepage of oil on metallic surfaces, other applications may be made. For example, wood has its capillary action halted when impregnated with a30% non-wettable film material carried in a vehicle such as a refined hydrocarbon of a kerosene nature, for example, the material known as Bayol obtained from the Standard Oil Development Co. of New Jersey, or a chlorinated diphenyl. The wood so treated is altered to the extent that the capillary action usually observed when wood is immersed in a liquid is stopped. Such treatment is, therefore, valuable to prevent undesirable liquids, moisture and the like getting into wood and to prevent the entrance into the wood of "fungus disease and other destructive agencies.

Another instance of the applicability of the present invention is the prevention of creepage of oil or moisture in cotton by the impregnation of the latter with a non-wettable film material. Such treatment readily ugsests itself to woven cablecovering, textile and similar materials to render them moisture-proof or oil-proof in character.

Still another application is the treatment of 30 filter paper with non-wettable film material producing a drastic change in its properties and rendering it water-proof -and oil-proof. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. The method of making a surface non wettable by mineral oil which comprises incorporating about 5% by weight of calcium stearate into a moisture-free varnish. applying 4 said mixture to the cleaned surface to be treated and allowing the coated surface to dry.

2. The method of preventing material'from absorbing liquids bycapillary action which consists in treating the material with a composition which when dried is insoluble in such liquids and which consists of from 1 to 10% by weight of a dried metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate,. strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate, incorporated in a moisturefree varnish, and allowing the treated material to dry.

3. The method of preventing material from absorbing .liquids by capillary action which consists in treating the material with a moisturefree composition which when dried is insoluble in such liquids and which consists of a substantial but minor proportionof a dried metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate and a major proportion of a moisture-free vehicle of the class consisting of varnish, lacquer and chlorinated diphenyl, and allowing the treated material to dry.

4. An article of manufacture having a surface provided with a film of dried varnish containing calcium stearate in an amount corresponding to about 5% by weight of the varnish as initially applied to the surface.

5. The method of making a surface non-, wettable by mineral oil which consists in incorporating into a moisture-free varnish from about 1 to 10% by weight of a composition consisting of a metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate, applying said mixture to the cleaned surface to be treated and allowing the coated surface to dry.

6. A method of treating wood which includes the step of impregnating wood with a composi tion consisting of a substantial but minor proportion of a metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate, and a major proportion of chlorinated diphenyl.

7. Wood impregnated with a composition consisting of a substantial but minor proportion of metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate,

chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate, and a major proportion of chlorinated diphenyl. i

8. Wood impregnated with a composition consisting of about 80% by. weight of a metallic stearate of the class cc -of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate, and about by weight of chlorinated diphenyl.

'9. A substance consisting of a material normally capable of absorbing liquids by capillary action and'which has a surface thereof provided with a film of a hardened composition which is insoluble in such liquids and which consists, as initially applied to said surface, of a substantial but minor proportion of dried metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate, and thorium stearate and a major proportion-of a moisture-free vehicle of the class consisting of varnish, lacquer and chlorinated diphenyl. a

10; An article having a surface non-wettable by mineral .011, said article comprising a substance having a surface normally wettable by mineral oil and on said last-named surface a dried film which consists, as initially applied thereto, of about 1 to 10% by weight of a composition consisting of a metallic stearate of the class consisting of ferric stearate, calcium stearate, lead stearate, barium stearate, strontium stearate, cadmium stearate, chromium stearate, tin stearate and thorium stearate' incorporated in a moisture-free varnish.

VINCENT J. SCHAEFER. d.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2783160 *Mar 30, 1953Feb 26, 1957Jolly J TaylorFilm forming oil stabilized with dibasic lead phosphite
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/498, 106/222, 384/625, 106/2, 428/907
International ClassificationB05D7/06, D21H17/14, C09D7/12, B05D5/08, D21H21/16, D06M13/188
Cooperative ClassificationD21H21/16, D06M2200/11, B05D5/08, Y10S428/907, C08K5/098, C09D7/1233, D06M13/188, B05D7/06, D06M2200/12, D21H17/14
European ClassificationB05D5/08, D21H21/16, B05D7/06, D06M13/188, C09D7/12D4