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Publication numberUS2109197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1938
Filing dateAug 31, 1936
Priority dateAug 31, 1936
Publication numberUS 2109197 A, US 2109197A, US-A-2109197, US2109197 A, US2109197A
InventorsHumason Granville A
Original AssigneeHumason Granville A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination clean-out and sample tool
US 2109197 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 22, 1938.

G. A. HUMASON' 2,109,197

COMBINATION CLEAN-OUT AND SAMPLE TOOL Filed Aug. 51, 1956 2 Sheets-Shet 1 I 2, |5 36 a 27 F I 59 s I 5 55 32- l6 2 as 25 5 2o J 25 2| ammo/M900 gmomf flfi amasolv. 66 2am 37 F151, v $013 QM Feb. '22, 1938.

COMBINATION CLEAN-OUT AND SAMPLE TOOL 'G. A. HUMASON 2,109,197

Filed Aug. 51, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Feb. 22, 1938 I 2,109,197 COMBINATION CLEAN-OUT AND SAMPLE 'roor.

Granville A. Humason, Houston, Tex.

Application August 31, 1936, Serial No. 98,632

11 Claims.

The invention relates to a tool which is particularly adapted for cleaning out wells and obtaining a sample of the material which is present in the well.

It will be understood that in the rotary method of drilling wells the drill bit is rotated bythe drill stem and a supply of flushing fluid is pumped downwardly into the stem and upwardly into the well bore in order to maintain the walls of the well bore, to carry away the cuttings from the drill bit, and to overcome the pressures encountered in the formations which are penetrated. In many instances the static head of this column of fluid in the well bore causes the fluid to pene trate productive or desirable formations and they may be inadvertently passed by the drill.

The present invention contemplates a tool which can be lowered into the well bore and there located so that it may be opened up, and in this manner the string of pipe by which the tool is lowered into the well within is opened to the area in the well bore below the tool so that the differential pressure will cause a flow of the ma terial in the well bore into the tool and thence into the string by which the tool is operated so that the well bore is not only cleaned out but a sample of the fluid is also obtained.

It is one of the objects of the invention to provide a tool to be-located in the well bore which will be closed untll such time as it is desired to open the same so that the differential pressure will cause a flow of fluid into the tool in order to obtain the sample.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a sampling tool with a movable valve which is adapted to be opened.

Another object of the invention is to provide two relatively movable members which can be used to control the flow of fluid from a well bore into a string of pipe.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a tool in which circulationmay be maintained and the well washed out while the tool is located in the well bore and to thereafter take a sample of the fluid in the well below the tool. Another object of the invention is to draw into the sampling tool a specimen of the fluid in the formation and to then separate the first part of the sample which enters the tool from the latter part of the sample which enters the tool in order to obtain an uncontaminated sample.

Other and further objects of the invention will be readily apparent when the following description is considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a vertical sectional view of the operating string and its connection to the tool showing the string in closed position. v

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the string in open position.-

Fig. 3 is a section taken on line 33 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view of one of the tools which is adapted to be connected to the string shown in Fig. 1 or 2.

Fig. 5 shows another form of the tool which can be attached to the operating string.

Fig. 6 is a. sectional view of the lower end of the tool shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 1-! of Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view of a cutter head which may be applied to the operating string of Fig. l or -2 when it is merely desired to circulate downwardly through the operating string or to open the operating string to permit the entry of fluid from the well bore.

The operating string is shown in Fig. 1 with the parts in the position in which they will be located when the string is to be lowered into the well bore. The string is shown as being located in a a coupling 4. A suitable packing or sealing member 5 is clamped in position by the coupling 4 and is normally flared outwardly to contact with the inside of the casing 2 to form a seal. This packing 5 flares upwardly so that when pressure is applied to the upper face 6 thereof the tendency is to move the packing against the inside of the pipe 2 and increase the sealing action.

A mandrel Ill is threaded at i l to the coupling 4 and this mandrel extends downwardly below the lower end of the coupling and is threaded at I2 in order to receive the sleeve !3. A coil spring 14 is positioned between the upper end of the sleeve I3 and a washer I5 which in turn abuts against the lower end of the coupling 4. This spring normally urges the sleeve! away from the coupling 4 and the operating string 3.

The operating string 3 may be either a drill stem or tubing and if it is the latter it may include a working barrel portion so that a pump may be located therein above the device.

The mandrel Ill extends downwardly inside of the sleeve l3 and carries a plurality of packings I6 chamber 26 within the sleeve l3. If desired, a I

which are arranged to seal with the inside surface of the sleeve I3 soas to prevent a flow of fluid along the mandrel inside of the sleeve in either direction. The lower end of this mandrel is formed with a valve like portion which is tapered and arranged to seat in the valve seat 2|, which is carried by the body 22. The seat 2| is in the form of arecess in the body 22 and is shaped to receive the valve member'2ll. A suitable packing 23 serves to form a seal between the valve and the valve seat in addition to the 'contact of the parts. A plurality of passages 25 extend upwardly into the body 22- and enter the plurality of springs or resilient members 21 are carried by the sleeve I3 and normally press against the inside of the pipe 2 to resist rotation of the sleeve I3 and the body 22. A plurality of openings 33 are provided in the sleeve I3 to permit the inflow and outflow of fluid upon the relative movement of the sleeve -I3 and the mandrel II). It will be particularly noted that the recess forming the valve seat 2| does not extend through the body 22 so that when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. l the passage 32 into the string of pipe 3 is closed off by the closure of the valve member 20. v

In Fig. 2 the parts are shown with the valve 20 moved out of its seat 2| so as to permit an inflow of material into the passage 25 and upwardly into the mandrel I0 into the passage 32. The opening of the valve 20 is eifected by merely rotating the stem 3 so that the mandrel I0 rotates relative to the sleeve I3 to efiect unscrewing of the threaded portion I2. The open position of the operating string is seen in Fig. 2 where the threads I2 have moved completely out of the sleeve I3 and the valve 23 has moved out of its seat 2|. The mandrel III is provided with a choke portion 33.

When the parts are assembled in the position shown in Fig. 1. the valvewill be closed so as to seal the passage 32 This passage and the entire string 3 may be empty when the operating string is lowered into the well so that when the valve 20 is opened the diflerential pressure between the inside and the outside of the pipe will be available to cause a flow of the fluid into the pipe, it being understood that the well bore is usually full of liquid and in some instances there will be an' enormous pressure to cause the flow on the bottom of the well bore in order to remove deposits of material or accumulations of sand or cuttings which may have occurred. If such anoperation is desired a cutter head such as shown in Fig. 8 may be employed. This head includes a body 35 which has a threaded area-36 .to engage with the threads 31 in the lower end of the body 22. Any desired number of cutters 33 may be arranged on the bottom of the cutter head. Ports 39 are provided in'the body-and lead into a central opening 40. With this head in position the operating string may be rotated at the time the flow of fluid occurs so as to agitate the material in the bottom of the well.

Under certain conditions in the well bore a tool such as shown in Fig. 4 may be utilized. This tool includes a body portion having a head at 42 which is threaded at 43 into the threads 3'! of the operating string. This head 42 is provided with a plurality of lateral passages 44 which extend from the central passage 45 to the .any' inflow at the top of the tool.

outside of the body 32. 'A check valve 48 is provided in each passage so as to prevent the inflow of fluid. The lower end of thepassage 45 is closed by a ball valve 48 which is disposed in a cage 49, which is in turn carried by a nipple 50 which serves as a connecting member between the head 42 and the main body 52 of the tool. The main body 52 is provided with an enlarged opening 53 which may be utilized to receive a core in event the tool is used for pore drilling. A core cutter 54 is shown as connected to the lower end of the body 52 anda core catcher 55 is provided therein;

With the tool shown in Fig. 4 connected to the operating string it seems obvious that the tool can be lowered into the well bore and when the operating string is open, as seen in Fig. 2, there willbe a sudden inflow of fluid from the well bore so that the mud and flushing fluid below the packer 5 will flow into the operating string and cause fluid from the formation to enter the well bore. This washes away any contaminating material in the bottom of the wellbore and all of this undesirable material flows upwardly through the core barrel past the ball valve 43 and is trapped in the operating string by the valve 48'. The fluid which last flowed into the body 52 will of course be the most nearly pure sample of the fluid coming into the well bore from the formation and if it is deemed that this sample is suflicient'the tool can now be removed obtained if it is desired to then take a core from the bottom of the well bore the valve 20 can be closed and the tool rotated so that a core will enter the sample 53.

The Core -In some instances when a tool of this type is. lowered into the well bore the flushing fluid may settle about the tool or other cuttings may cause it to become stuck in the well bore. In this event pressure may be applied to the operating string 8 and a flow of fluid will thus,.pass through the passages 34 and into the well bore so that circulation, may be established and the tool removed from the well. In other instances it is desirable to remove the flushing fluid or mud from the well after the tool has been rotated into position andit this be true water or other fluid may be circulated downwardly to the operating stem and outwardly through the passage 14 into the well bore.

In Fig. 5 another form of tool is illustrated which is particularly adapted for use where a rat The rat hole is packing of resilient material is positioned.

This material is arranged to contact the body on the upper end of the rat hole and to form a seal therewith and may be of lead, rubber or other suitable material. The body 63 is provided with a chamber 53 the same as previously described and also carries a check valve 48 which is similar to the one shown in Fig. 4.

An alternative form of check valve has been shown in Fig. 5, and this valve takes the form of a ring 68 which is slidablymounted upon the extension 69 which is formed on the upper end of the body 63. This ring valve engages on the seat 10 on the head 63 and is normally urged to closed position by a spring II which may be of any strength desired. This valve releases when pressure is applied in the passage 45 inside of the tool and serves to permit the discharge of fluid from the inside to the outside of the tool.

The lower end of the tool of Fig. 5 carries a core receiving tube 15, the lower end of which is seen in Fig. 6. A core catcher I6 is provided in this form of invention.

Broadly, the invention embodies a tool which can be used to clean out a well or take a sample of the material which is in the well.

What is claimed is:

1. A combination cleanout and sampling device for wells comprising a tool to be located in a well bore, a setting string of pipe connected to said device, a valve member on said tool having a bore communicating with the interior of said string, a body carrying a valve seat threadably connected to said valve member whereby the entry through said valve member to the string may be closed, and the string and tool are anchored against relative rotation when the valve is closed, and spring means to urge said valve and valve seat apart when the threaded connec tion is released to lift the valve from the valve seat whereby fluid in the well below said tool will enter the string of pipe.

2. A sampling tool for well bores comprising an operating string of pipe to be lowered into the well bore containing drilling fluid, a valve member including a valve and valve seat normally closing the lower end of said string, a mandrel carrying said valve, a body carrying said seat, a threaded connection between said body and mandrel whereby relative rotation moves said valve from said seat to open said string for the entry of a sample of the material from the well bore below the tool, and spring means to separate said valve and seat upon unscrewing of the mandrel.

3. In a cleanout and sampling tool provided with a packer to be used within a well, an operating string of pipe, a hollow valve member on said string extending downwardly from said packer, a body carrying a valve seat adapted to close the bore of said hollow valve member, a releasable connection between said valve member and said body and spring means to urge said valve member and valve seat apart when said parts are released.

4. A tool for use in a well bore including a body carrying a valve seat, a mandrel carrying a valve for said seat, a sleeve on said body, cooperating threaded areas on said sleeve and mandrel whereby relative rotation of the mandrel and sleeve will open or close said valve, and a choke carried by said mandrel to control the flow of fluid when said valve is open.

5. A tool of the character described comprising an operating string, a body carried thereby,

said string and body being relatively rotatable, a valve to be operated by such relative rotation, and a sample taking tool connected to said body, a, check valve therein to trap the incoming fluid, and a check valve to release more than a predetermined pressure in said string.

6. A tool of the character described comprising an operating string, a body carried thereby, said string and body being relatively rotatable, a valve tobe operated by such relative rotation, and a sample taking tool connected to said body, a check valve therein to trap the incoming fluid, and a check valve to release more than a predetermined pressure in said string, said last mentioned check valve comprising a ring. I

'7. A tool of the character described comprising an operating string, a body carried thereby, said string and body being relatively rotatable, a valve to be operated by such relative rotation, and a sample taking tool connected to said body, a check valve therein to trap the incoming fluid, and a check valve to release more than a predetermined pressure in said string, said last mentioned check valve comprising a ring having spring means to urge itto closed position.

8. A tool of the character described comprising an operating string, a body carried thereby, said string and body being relatively rotatable, a valve to be operated by such relative rotation to close the valve and fix the body and string against further relative rotation, and a sample taking tool connected to said body, a check valve therein to trap the incoming fluid, and a check valve to release more than a predetermined pressure in said string, said latter tool including a core taking portion.

9. In a cleanout and sampling tool provided with a packer to be used within a well, a hollow mandrel to support the packer and provide, a chamber, the end of said mandrel constituting a valve member, a body having a valve seat op-' erable to open or closed position with the valve end of said mandrel to control'the flow of material into said chamber from the well, and spring means to urge said valve and valve seat apart when the mandrel is released from said body.

10. A tool of the character described comprising an operating string, a body carried thereby, said string and body being relatively rotatable, a valve operable by such relative rotation, and a sample taking tool connected to said body, a check valve at the lower end of said tool to trap incoming sample fluid, and a check valve thereabove to release more than a predetermined pressure in said string.

11. In a tool of the character described the combination of a tubular body adapted to be connected to a tubing string, said body having a downwardly tapering section thereon, packing on said tapered section to seal with the walls of a rat-hole within a well bore, an annular valve seat on the exterior of said body, above said tapered section, there being openings from the interior of the body to said seat, a ring valve surrounding the-body and adapted to engage the seat and close said openings, and means for resiliently holding said valve upon its seat until a predetermined pressure outwardly of the body is reached.

GRANVILLE A. HUMASON.

iii

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2421399 *Aug 9, 1943Jun 3, 1947DavidsonCement retainer
US2742093 *Jun 30, 1952Apr 17, 1956Tri State Oil Tool Company IncTubing test tools
US2942670 *May 26, 1958Jun 28, 1960Erwin BurnsCirculating shoe
US3722558 *Dec 10, 1970Mar 27, 1973Acraloc CorpVacuum nozzle
US4518051 *Jun 30, 1983May 21, 1985Chevron Research CompanyPercussion actuated core sampler
US5131473 *Mar 13, 1991Jul 21, 1992Mobil Oil CorporationControlled rate well cementing tool
US6802488 *Aug 30, 2002Oct 12, 2004The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationElectro-mechanical coaxial valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/234, 166/330, 175/59, 251/347, 277/336, 166/334.1, 166/151, 166/152, 166/102, 175/240, 251/118, 166/167
International ClassificationE21B37/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B37/00
European ClassificationE21B37/00