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Publication numberUS2110735 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1938
Filing dateOct 20, 1933
Priority dateOct 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 2110735 A, US 2110735A, US-A-2110735, US2110735 A, US2110735A
InventorsMozes H Marton
Original AssigneeMozes H Marton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical needle and holder
US 2110735 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v March 8, 1938, M, H MAR-[ON 2,l0,735

SURGICAL NEEDLE AND HOLDER Filed 0G13. 20. 1955 fici-7.

IN V EN TOR. Maze s H. /V/'cff 20/7 ,wirl f 4,/ f

ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 8, 1938 UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICEA SURGICAL NEEDLE AND HOLDER Mozes H. Marton, New York, N. Y. Application October 20, 1933, Serial No. 694,405

11 Claims,

The improved surgical instrument Comprising the present invention is primarily adapted for use as a depilator for the permanent destruction of hair bulbs which prevents further formation or growth of the hair after the bulb has been destroyed. The invention is, with or without modication, capable of other uses and the same may be employed, for example, in the permanent destruction of tissue underlying the skin, or in the coagulation or cauterization of tissue cells.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide an insulated surgical electrode, which is preferably in the form of a ne wire or needle, having its penetrating portion insulated, which enables one to cauterize, coagulate or destroy tissue cells located below the surface of the epidermis, without causing electrical injury to the epidermis itself.

With the uninsulated electrodes such as heretofore in use, that is to say, such electrodes as do not have the penetrating portion of the electrode insulated, this could not be done except at the secrice of a good deal of the overlying epidermis, which resulted in scariflcation and a change in the pigmentation of the aiected areas. Therefore, such results practically made futile the elforts to improve the appearance of the skin from an aesthetic point of view, and such results were also just as undesirable from a medical point of View. l

Other objects of the invention are to provide Van improved surgical electrode and holder to form a cauterizing instrument wherein the members thereof may be simply assembled and conveniently operated, and furthermore to provide a marked improvement in the electrode unit itself.

These being among the objects of the present invention, the same consists of certain features of construction and combinations of parts to be hereinafter described and then claimed with reference to the accompanying drawing illustrating one embodiment of the invention and wherein Fig. l is a side elevation of the complete instrument including the electrode and its holder;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section of a portion of the instrument shown in Fig. 1 on the line 2-2 thereof;

Fig. 3 is a still further enlarged cross-section on the iine `3--3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail section of a portion of the holder;

Fig. .5 is a longitudinal section of the electrode unit which includes the electrode;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section of the tip-mem- (ol. 12s-393.18)

ber of the holder which is adapted to receive the electrode of Fig. 5, these two figures being on a different scale, and

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section of the electrode unit which is adapted to form part of the electrode.

The tubular holder or handle I of the instrument is provided with a `tapered tip-membe-r II also of tubular form, and these are both composed of non-conducting material which may be hard rubber. One end of the holder Il) is provided with a screw-threaded neck I0', the holder having a bore Illa. The holder and its tip-member may have a suitable length adapting them for their use. Tip-member I I is provide-d with an enlarged bore IIa to provide a skirt therearound and a smaller portion II of said bore is provided with a screw thread adapted to be en' gaged with the screw threaded neck Iii. That portion I lb of the bore which passes through the tapered part of the tip-member I I is of the smallest diameter and is adapted to receive the electrode to be hereinafter described. It will be seen that when the parts are threaded together the skirt portion around the large bore I 0a of the tip-member receives the adjacent larger portion of the holder Iii, there being a slide t between the two to permit the tip-member to be adjusted inwardly or outwardly on the holder IIJ. The out- Ward position of the tip-member is shown in full lines in Fig..2 and the inward position thereof is shown in broken lines.

In Fig. an electrode unit is illustrated, it being shown in position on the instrument in Figs. 1 and l2. The electrode includes `a thin metal tube I 2 at the outside thereof and an interior layer or covering I3 of insulating material around and sheathing a fine wire I4 which forms the metallic needle proper of the electrode, and theouter terminal of which slightly protrudes from the insulating covering I 3 while its inner terminal protrudes for a greater distance beyond the corresponding end of the insulating covering I3.

The insulation I3 of the needle proper may be formed of any suitable insulating material and is desirably formed from a length of glass tubing or other vitreous material. which may be drawn or moulded into-a small diameter so as to thoroughly encase, and to adhere to, the needle proper except for the two terminals referred to.

In Fig. 7 a unit is illustrated which may be characterized as a needle unit inasmuch as it may be manufactured as a separate article of manufacture, or the same may be combined with the outer metal tube I2 to provide a complete electrode unit, in which case the innei` terminal of the needle proper I4 is preferably connected by solder I8 with the metallic tube I2 so as to provide a suitable electrical connection between the two metal elements.

Suitable proportions with respect to the length and thickness of the electrode are important. The needle i4, as before stated, consists of a ne metallic wire, and it has been found in practice that good results are obtained with a ne wire of a ldiameter or" around 0.16 mm. The degree of protrusion of the point portion of the electrode proper beyond the insulation or layer I3 may in practice be approximately 1 mm. It is important that the penetrating portion of the electrode which is directly behind the point portion, and follows it into the skin, should be suitably formed and of proper proportions. Therefore the insulation is tapered down at I3 to a thickness that increases the diameter of the electrode to a barely perceptible degree.

Oi course, the drawing, except Fig. 1, shows the parts of the instrument as exaggerated in size, but the proportions substantially as stated are quite important.

Referring to Figs. 2 and 4 it will be seen that the threaded neck Iii of the holder Ii] contains a longitudinally split metallic tube I6, the slot I6 through which permits slight expansion or contraction of the tube I6. This tube is surrounded by a bushing il of suitable material which is fitted tightly into the neck I', and which reinforces and strengthens the neck. The split metal tube I6 is adapted to serve as a sort of clutch, inasmuch as when the tip member II is screwed back to the position shown in broken lines in Fig. 2, the electrode, Fig. 5, may be slid into such tube and clutched thereby so as to retain the same, with the tube I2 and the tube I6 in electrical contact. When so doing, the pliers used to insert the electrode are caused to grasp the outer end portion of the metal tube I2 which protects the insulation I3 against damage thereby. When the instrument is to be used for cauterization or the like, the tip-member II is adjusted tothe full line position shown in Fig. 2, or a little further if desired, to cover the metal tube I2 so that the hand of the operator which grasps the instrument is protected against electric shock. The grip of the split tube i6 on the inner end of the electrode is suiilcient to hold the same in using position and to permit the tip-member I I of the holder to be screwed inwardly or outwardly relatively to the electrode without shifting the electrode with it. By screwing the tip-member inwardly to the position shown in broken lines in Fig. 2, a suicient length of the metal tube i2 of the electrode is exposed so that pliers may be used by the operator to grip it and remove the electrode at any time desired.

A suitable insulated electrical conductor I9 is shown, which is provided at one end with a suitable plug IS for establishing a connection with the source of electricity. The linner endo the conductor I9 isl either secured by solder Ia, as shown in Fig. 4, or the end of the conductor may be plugged tightly into the adjacent end of the split tube and the conducting wires exposed and in electrical Contact with the split metallic tube I6, as shown in Fig. 2. It will therefore be seen that when the patient being treated establishes in any well known manner a circuit through the source of electricity as by a suitable electrode in contact with another part of the body of the patient, that the current flows through the wires of the conductor I9, the metallic sleeve or clutch I6, the metallic sleeve I2 of the electrode, the inner end of needle proper I4, and through the needle to that part of the body of the patient which is to be treated, whereby the exposed tip of the needle proper may be used for cauterization or the like. At the same time the terminal portion I3a of the insulation around the needle protects the skin of the patient against injury by the current, and it being of such a small diameter, say approximately twice that of the diameter of the needle proper, it can follow the extreme tip of the needle in penetrating the skin.

Obviously the invention may be modified more or less without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new is- 1. A surgical electrode comprising an insulated penetrating portion adapted to penetrate and extend into the skin, said insulated electrode having an exposed uninsulated tip of smaller diameter than the penetrative portion adapted to contact with a portion of an underlying body to be destroyed, and means for applying a destructive electric current to said portion through said uninsulated tip the relation of the uninsulated tip and the penetrating portion being such that the portion to be destroyed may be affected locally without damaging overlying skin tissues.

2. A surgical electrode comprising a holder and an electrode proper comprising an insulated penetrating portion adapted to penetrate and extend into the skin and having'at its extreme end an uninsulated portion adapted to contact with a tissue to be destroyed, and means for applying a destructive electric current to said tissue through said uninsulated end portion, said insulated portion protecting the skin penetrated from the effect of said electric current.

3. The method of destroying hair bulbs which underlie the skin to effect permanent removal of hair, which comprises passing an electrode through the skin so that its extreme end enters an underlying hair bulb, applying a destructive electric current to said bulb through said extreme end while insulating the skin tissues overlying the hair bulb.

4. A depilatory electrode for the destruction of hair bulbs comprising Van electrode adapted to initially puncture and penetrate the skin so that its extreme end. enters an underlying hair bulb, and a thin coating of non-conducting material covering the penetrating portion of said electrode and terminating short of the extreme forward end of the same whereby said electrode is insulated from the skin penetrated, and means for applying a destructive electric current to said bulb through the uninsulated forward end of said electrode.

5. A surgical needle-like electrode adapted for use in the permanent destruction of hair bulbs comprising an insulated penetrating portion having its extreme end exposed, said electrode being adapted to puncture and together with said insulation penetrate the skin so that the exposed end of the same enters an underlying hair bulb, and means for applying a weak destructive electric current to said bulb through said electrode.

6. A surgical electrode adapted for use in the permanent destruction of hair bulbs comprising an insulated penetrating portion having its extreme end exposed, the exposed end of said electrode being adapted to puncture the skin and enter an underlying hair bulb, the insulation of said penetrating portion being adapted to pass through the puncture thus made in the skin by said exposed end and serving to insulate the contacting skinA from said electrode, and means for applying a destructive electric current to said bulb through said exposed end.

'7. A surgical needle adapted for use in the permanent destruction of hair bulbs comprising an insulated penetrating portion having its extreme end exposed, said needle being adapted to puncture and together with said insulation penetrate the skin so that the exposed end of the same enters an underlying hair bulb, and means for applying a weak destructive electric current to said bulb through said needle.

8. The method of destroying sub-surface tissue which comprises passing an electrode through the skin so that its extreme end enters said subsurface tissue, applying a destructive electric current to said tissue through said electrode while insulating the skin along the path of penetration from electrical injury.

9. AV surgical electrode for the destruction of hair bulbs or like bodies underlying the skin, which comprises a conductor having an uninsulated tip adapted to enter the skin and penetrate a hair bulb, said tip being of uniformly small diameter and an insulating coating of small but uniform thickness on said conductor from a point closely adjacent said tip toI a point which lies outside the skin when the tip penetrates a hair bulb for destroying the same, whereby the elec'- trode may be inserted into the skin without forming a conical opening therein and a destructive electric current may be applied locally to a hair bulb without affecting overlying tissues.

10. A surgical electrode adapted for use in the permanent destruction of hair bulbs and like bodies underlying the skin which comprises an elongated conductor of small diameter having an uninsulated tipadapted to penetrate the skin and extend into a hair bulb, a thin insulating coating on said conductor from a point closely adjacent said tip to a point which lies outside but adjacent the skin tissues when the tip is inserted into a hair bulb for use, whereby a destructive electric current may be applied to the bulb without aiiecting overlying tissues and a thicker insulating coating extending backward on the conductor from the point last recited, the junction between the insulating coating of diierent thickness serving as a gauge to facilitate the insertion of the electrode for the proper distance to penetrate a hair bulb.

11. A surgical electrode for the destruction of hair bulbs or like bodies underlying the skin which comprises a conductor having an uninsulated tip adapted to enter the skin and penetrate a hair bulb, an insulating coating on said conductor from a point closely adjacent said tip backward whereby the electrode may be inserted into the skin in such manner that the tip enters a hair bulb and the coating insulates the tissues overlying such bulb so that a destructive electric current may be applied locally to the bulb without aiecting such tissues, and means on the electrode at a point which lies outside but adjacent the skin when the electrode is inserted for use to serve as a gauge for facilitating the accurate insertion of the tip into a hair bulb.

MOZES H. MARTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3035580 *Dec 27, 1960May 22, 1962Guiorguiev MethodiSurgical needle
US3920022 *Apr 19, 1974Nov 18, 1975Pastor Macey ASurgical instrument
US4103688 *Apr 29, 1976Aug 1, 1978John EdwardsMethod and apparatus for sterilization
US4112950 *Oct 22, 1976Sep 12, 1978Aspen LaboratoriesMedical electronic apparatus and components
US4892105 *Jan 11, 1988Jan 9, 1990The Cleveland Clinic FoundationElectrical stimulus probe
US4998934 *Aug 21, 1989Mar 12, 1991Gerald BernsteinNeedle adaptor for an electrosurgical tool
US5030218 *Oct 26, 1989Jul 9, 1991Lee AlexanderBlade is niobium; overcoating with niobium oxide
US5695495 *Nov 20, 1995Dec 9, 1997Ellman; Alan G.Electrosurgical electrode for sclerotherapy
US6306100Dec 16, 1998Oct 23, 2001Richard L. PrassIntraoperative neurophysiological monitoring system
US7214197Nov 6, 2001May 8, 2007Prass Richard LIntraoperative neurophysiological monitoring system
US7310546May 26, 2006Dec 18, 2007Prass Richard LArtifact detection electrode
US7335211 *Oct 23, 2003Feb 26, 2008Cheng-Kun ChenTransmission system of eyebrow-beautifying device
US7867225 *Jun 29, 2006Jan 11, 2011Microline Surgical, IncElectrosurgical instrument with needle electrode
US7867226 *Jun 29, 2006Jan 11, 2011Microline Surgical, Inc.Electrosurgical needle electrode
US7959632 *Oct 20, 2006Jun 14, 2011Fugo Richard JPlasma incising device including disposable incising tips for performing surgical procedures
WO1992011817A1 *Jan 7, 1991Jul 23, 1992Lee AlexanderElectrosurgical instrument
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/44
International ClassificationA61B18/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2018/00452, A61B2018/00476, A61B18/14
European ClassificationA61B18/14