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Publication numberUS2115634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1938
Filing dateJun 25, 1937
Priority dateMay 20, 1933
Publication numberUS 2115634 A, US 2115634A, US-A-2115634, US2115634 A, US2115634A
InventorsKiesel Oskar
Original AssigneeOtto Gutmann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heavy oil carburetor
US 2115634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 26, 193s.

O. KIESEL HEAVY OIL CARBURETORV Filed June 25, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet l Fie] INVENToPg OSKAR Y( ESEL BY 014,7, *JMW (b5 ATTORNEYS April 26, 1938. Q KlEsEL l2,115,634

HEAVY OIL 'CARBURETOR Filed June 25, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Ummm llnlnu mllllllll lllIHIIlI Hll 4 By lfm/m7, @YM ATTORNEYS April 426, 1938. o. KlEsl-:L

HEAVY OIL CARBURETOR Filed June 25, I19:57 .5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INV'ENToR 0 S K A R KI E 5 E L @60N/wg, www

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Patented Apr. 26, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HEAVY OIL CARBURETOR Application June 25, 1937, Serial No. 150,378 InGermany May 20, 1933 4 Claims.

The known heavy-oil carburetors present considerable disadvantages which render the use of `aheavy oil diflicult as a general motive uid for internal combustion engines. Thus in heavy oil 0&5 carburetors generally used up to now the heavy motive fluid is excessively heated and in consequence thereof the readily evaporative components vcontained therein are extracted rst, so that the remaining components have a considerrilii) able lowered rate of combustion. Owing to the `loss of the readily evaporative parts there remains a residue of fuel which can only be `atilized by the constant working pressure method (Diesel method). It cannot be used, however, for engines having spark ignition systems. The excessive heat and the resultant vaporizatlon of the readily evaporative components also `cause continuous clogging of the carburetor and the fuel pipes.

so Apart `from the objectionable high temperature of `the heavy motive fluid a further `disadvantage of the known carburetor is apparent in `that the heavy motive fluid decomposes into its molecular components by the air suction which likewise causes a considerable amount of heating. In addition to this the air suction must be forced at a great velocity, as otherwise there would be insufficient power for atomizing the heavy motive iluid. Owing to the fact that a high throttling of the suction air becomes continuously necessary at the combustion nozzle there is a great decrease in the output of the motor. This reduction of output of the motor is reduced still further due to the fact that to use a heavy motive fluid the air sucked by the engine must be considerably preheated.

All these disadvantages are overcome by the heavy-oil carburetor according to the present invention in which two floats and two injection i0 nozzles are provided in a joint common casing for the optional use of light or heavy motive iiuids. To start the motor, a light motive uid is used which is atomized in the usual manner by the suction of the motor. When the motor has been 45 heated to a certain temperature the heavy oil may be used, and for atomizing the heavy oil air is utilized which is compressed and heated in a special compressor.

The heavy-oil carburetor according to the in- 50 vention is illustrated in one form of execution on the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a longitudinal section of the carburetor;

Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view taken on line e5 II-II of Fig. 1;

(Cl. 12B-127) Fig. 3 is a side view;

Fig. 4 is a top View; and

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view of the entire system.

The carburetor consists of a tubular casing I i5 having on opposite sides thereof two float chambers 2 and 2', one forheavy motive 'fluid l2 and the other for light motive uid 2. The motive uids are fed through the pipes 3 and in which valves 4 and 4 are provided. To control the sup- 1u ply of fuel needle valves 5 and 5' are placed in the chambers 2 and 2 and the chamber 2 is connected to the heavy oil nozzle 'I by pipe 6 and the chamber 2 to the light oil nozzle 8 by pipe 6. The heavy oil nozzle I is inclined towards le the orifice of the blast pipe 9 serving to supply compressed air, while the `light oil nozzle 8 terminates in a channel I 0 in an air-regulating cone II carried on the blast pipe S. For simultaneous operation of the air-regulating cone I.I and the .20 fuel needle valves 5 and 5 `a multi-armed leverl I2is provided having a slot I3-in the upper arm by which the lever is guided on the carburetor casing by means of a pinfIlI. The leverl2 is connected at itsloweriend to a pin I5 which projects. into the interior of the carburetor through a slot IS and .is connected to the airregulating cone II. 5A tension spring II'I, connected at one end I'I to the carburetor casing and the other end I2 to the lever I2, tends to force the lever I2 30 downwardly and thus to force the air regulating cone on its seat 3U. The lever I2 has two hinged side arms I8 and I8 which press on the fuel needles of the valves 5 and 5' at their free ends by meansl of the adjusting screws I9 and I9. By turning the arms on their hinges 3| or 3l' the fuel needles may be easily and rapidly taken out.

The regulation of the feed of air and fuel is carried out by an automatic regulating device which engages the pin 20 of the lever I2, intermediate levers being interposed, if necessary, To regulate the mixture a throttle valve 2| is arranged in the upper part of the carburetor casing I. Below said throttle valve an interchangeable screen plate 22 is arranged which may be electrically heated if desired during cold weather.

The regulation of the mixture may be effected by means of a vacuum regulator 23 (Fig. 5), but it may also be controlled electrically. For this purpose a magnetic coil 24 is provided which receives current from a small separately excited auxiliary generator 25. The generator is coupled to the motor so that its tension increases or decreases dependent on the speed of the motor.

With an increased tension the exciting-current also increases and consequently the drawing power of the magnetic coil so that the coil tends to pull the core 26 more or less in opposition to the tension of the spring. The adjusting power is transmitted to the lever I2 of the carburetor by means of a rodding system of rods 32.

The carburetor operates in the following manner:

When starting the motor, one operates rst with a light motive fluid after having adjusted the valves 4 and 4 accordingly, the fuel being atomized by the air suction. After the motor has become sufliciently warm, one changes over to heavy oil, drawing the combustion air from a compressed air container 21 which is continuously kept under pressure by a compressor 2B. Before the entry into the carburetor, the compressed air is heated in a superheater coil 29 which may surround the exhaust pipe of the engine. The hot compressed air creates in the carburetor a fuel mist which produces, in combnation with the easily heated additional air, a perfect gas-air mixture. Tests have proved that this mixture does not break down but retains its gaseous condition without any change whatever. The motor runs perfectly at any speed. As the suction air need not be throttled any longer, but only requires a uniform mixing with the heavy motive fluid which is already atomized separately, the highest output of the engine is attained in every case. The heavy motive fluid should be warmed somewhat in the carburetor so as to bring it to a more fluid state. As a rule the heat of the motor alone is sufcient for this purpose.

I claim as my invention:

l. A heavy-oil and light oil carburetor for a motor and of the type in which compressed air atomizes the fuel, comprising a casing, an adjusting device secured to the casing and being adapted to be regulated in dependence on the revolutionary speed of the motor, a pair of fuel needle valves in the casing one of which is for the heavy oil and the other for light oil, an air regulating valve in the casing, and means connecting the adjusting device to the air regulating valve and the fuel needle valves, the adjusting device including a cross-shaped element of which the vertical arm is connected to the air regulating valve and the other two horizontal arms are each connected to a fuel needle valve.

2. A heavy-oil and light oil carburetor for a motor and of the type in which compressed air atomizes the fuel, comprising a casing, an adjusting device secured to the casing and being adapted to be regulated in dependence on the revolutionary speed of the motor, a pair of fuel needle valves in the casing one of which is for the heavy oil and the other for light oil, an air regulating valve in the casing, and means connecting the adjusting device to the air regulating valve and the fuel needle valves, the adjusting device including a cross-shaped element of which the vertical arm is connected to the air regulating valve and the other two horizontal arms are each connected to a fuel needle valve and the horizontal arms being rotatably mounted on the vertical arm to disconnect a horizontal arm from its needle Valve when desired.

3. A heavy-oil and light oil carburetor for a motor and of the type in which compressed air atornizes the fuel, comprising a casing, an adjusting device secured to the casing and being adapted to be regulated in dependence on the revolutionary speed of the motor, a pair of fuel needle valves in the casing one of which is for the heavy oil and the other for light oil, an air regulating valve in the casing, means connecting the adjusting device to the air regulating valve and the fuel needle valves, and electrical means for adjusting the device.

4. A heavy-oil and light oil carburetor for a motor and of the type in which compressed air atomizes the fuel, comprising a casing, an adjusting device secured to the casing and being adapted to be regulated in dependence on the revolutionary speed of the motor, a pair of fuel needle valves in the casing one of which is for the heavy oil and the other for light oil, an air regulating valve in the casing, means connecting the adjusting device to the air regulating valve and the fuel needle valves, and means connected to the suction of the motor to operate the adjusting device.

OSKAR KIESEL,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2645898 *Sep 25, 1947Jul 21, 1953Hurtaj RomualdCombustion chamber having a series of expansion chambers
US3515106 *Aug 11, 1967Jun 2, 1970Hogere Tech SchoolApparatus for operating a spark ignition engine on two fuels
US4276864 *Feb 9, 1979Jul 7, 1981Gerhard WaschkuttisFuel-vaporizing system for internal-combustion engine and method of operating same
US4712531 *May 8, 1985Dec 15, 1987Hitachi, Ltd.Apparatus for adjusting specific volume of intake air for engine
US5595164 *Jun 22, 1995Jan 21, 1997Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Low profile intake manifold heater
US5743242 *Jan 4, 1996Apr 28, 1998Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Air intake heater with connector posts
US5887575 *Sep 10, 1997Mar 30, 1999Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Air intake heater with vertically oriented heating elements
US5988146 *Apr 15, 1998Nov 23, 1999Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Modular air intake heater
US5992399 *Nov 10, 1998Nov 30, 1999Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Modular air intake heater
US6073615 *Aug 10, 1999Jun 13, 2000Phillips & Temro Industries Inc.Modular air intake heater
US6119665 *Jul 2, 1998Sep 19, 2000Philips & Temro Industries Inc.Modular air intake heater
US6964269Mar 21, 2003Nov 15, 2005Dbk David + Baader GmbhHeating flange for preheating air in an intake line of an internal combustion engine
US7044115Jan 18, 2005May 16, 2006Dbk David & Baader GmbhHeating flange for preheating air in an intake line of an internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/531, 123/544, 261/1, 261/18.3, 123/575, 123/549
International ClassificationF02M1/16, F02M19/03, F02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M1/16, F02M1/00, F02M19/03, F02M2700/4316
European ClassificationF02M1/00, F02M19/03, F02M1/16