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Publication numberUS2116475 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1938
Filing dateMay 9, 1936
Priority dateMay 9, 1936
Publication numberUS 2116475 A, US 2116475A, US-A-2116475, US2116475 A, US2116475A
InventorsDietrich Daneke
Original AssigneeFred M Brackett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Work spacing mechanism for stripping machine
US 2116475 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. DANEKE May 3, 1938.

WORK sPAcING MECH/ mism Fo?. sTRlPPlNG MACHINES Filed May 9, 1956 3 SheetS-Sheet l INVENTQR Da ke.

NAV/? ATTORNEY May 3, 1938. D. DANI-:KE 2,116,475

WORK SPACING MECHANISM FOR STRIPPlNG MACHINES Filed May 9, 195e 3 sheets-sheet 2 May 3, 1938.

D. DANEKE 2,1 16,475

WORK SPACING MECHANISM FOR STRIPPING MACHINES INVENTOR Patented May 3, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFIE Dietrich Daneke, Topeka, Kans., assignor to Fred M. Brackett,

Topeka, Kans.

Application May 9, 1936, Serial No. 78,888

9 Claims.

This invention relates to stripping machines and more particularly to means for regulating the space between work-pieces, such as tablets or the like, that are fed through machines of this character.

In machines of this type, work-pieces are fed in successive or-der to a strip fixing mechanism so that the stripping material is applied in continuous form and then the individual work-pieces are cut apart by a severing device which cuts off the stripping material between the respective work-pieces, consequently it is necessary to convey the work-pieces in sufciently spaced relation to provide for movement of the severing device therebetween. This space is substantially critical for the reason that if it is too small the knife is apt to cut into the work-pieces and if too great there is not only waste of the stripping material but the capacity of the machine is reduced. Owing to the relative speed of the feeding and forwarding belts, thework-pieces moved by the feeding belt tend to clirnp up or override those carried by the forwarding belt.

Therefore, the principal objects of they present invention are to provide means for maintaining an accurate spacing between the work-pieces which is sufficient to freely accommodate the severing means but close enough toy avoid waste of the stripping material, and to prevent overriding when the work-pieces are delivered onto the forwarding belt.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention, hereinafter pointed out, I have provided improved details of structure, the

I) preferred form of which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the feed end of a conventional stripping machine equipped with a work-piece separating or spacing mechanism embodying the features of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary vertical section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 3, particularly illustrating drive of the feeding conveyor.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section through the feed end of the stripping machine.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary horizontal section particularly illustrating the slip clutch for driving theseparating cr spacing mechanism.

Fig. 5 is a vertical section, similar to Fig. 3, showing one of the spacing lugs` engaging between adjacent work-pieces to effect a predetermined spacing therebetween.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a portion of the separator belt including one ofthe spacing members.

Fig. 7 is a detail perspective view of one end of the spacing belt support.

Referring more in detail to the drawings:

I designates a portion of a conventional stripping machine including a bed plate 2 carried by a supporting frame 3, a strip applying mechanism generally -designated 4 that is adjustably positioned relative to the bed plate on standards 5, and a feed table 6.

The feed table 6 includes a feeding conveyor consisting of laterally spaced belts 1 and 8 for delivering work-pieces, `such as tablets S, to the strip applying mechanism. The belts "I and 8 operate over spaced pulleys Ill and Il carried on a shaft l2 that is mounted in suitable brackets I3 depending from the feed table 6, and are driven by a chain I4 that operates over a sprocket I5 thereon. The pulleys are so arranged that the upper runs of the belts operate substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the feed table B.

Supported above the belts 'I and 8 is a regulating device whereby feed of the work-pieces is regulated for individual feed into the stripping mechanism between upper and lower forwarding belts I6 and I1. The regulating device is supported from an adjacent standard 5 on a laterally extending V-shaped bracket I8 attached to the standard 5 and having a parallel offset flange I9 extending over the feed table substantially in line with travel of the work-pieces. The flange I9 is provided on its forward face with a vertically extending gude groove 20 for slidably supporting the guide rib 2| of a. stop plate 22. The stop plate is vertically arranged transversely of the belt and is provided at its lower end with a plurality of depending fingers. 23 forming stops for detainingly engaging the upper work-pieces until the lowermost work-piece has been fed under the fingers of the plate to the forwarding mechanism. l

'I'he upper end of the guide rib is provided with an ear 24 having an opening 25 in which is threaded an adjusting screw 26 having its end engaging against the upper face of the flange I9 whereby the stop plate Ina-y be moved to and from the upper surface of the feed belts to vary the spacing therebetween corresponding to the thickness of the work-pieces.

Secured to the opposite face of the stop plate is a laterally extending ear 21 for suspendingly supporting a presser plate 28, later described. Also carried by the stop plate is a stud 29 including a threaded shank 30 projecting through a slot 3| that extends vertically within the ange All'S I9 in parallel relation with the guide groove 28. Sleeved over the threaded end of the stud -29 is a washer 32, and threaded thereagainst is a wing nut 33 for clamping the stop plate to the bracket after it has been moved to adjusted position. Carried by the lower portion of the stop plate at a point spaced above the ngers 23, is a yoke 34 which includes a horizontal bar portion 35 xed to the face of the plate that carries the rib 2 I, and arms 36 and 31 having their free ends connected by the rod 38. The ends of arms 36 and 31 are provided with suitable bearing openings for pivotally mounting the'trunnions at the ends of a transverse bar 39 to which the presser plate 28 is secured.

The presser plate 28 is substantially rectangular in shape and has its bottom edge provided with spaced :lingers 40 adapted to move vertically within the slots 4| that are formed between the fingers 23 of the stop plate, previously described. The fingers 48 are curved upwardly at the for- Ward ends so that they will ride freely upon the top of the work-pieces as they are being fed to the stripping mechanism.

Carried by the upper f-ace of the presser plate is an ear 42 having an opening 43 therein for receiving the hooked end of a suspension rod 44. The upper end of the rod 44 extends through an opening 45 provided in the ear 21 and is suspendingly retained therein by lock nuts- 48 and 41 that are threaded on the rod. The presser plate is normally yieldingly retained against the work-pieces by a coil spring 48 having one end bearing against the ear 21 and its opposite end against a collar 49 that is xed on the rod 44.

Cooperating with the presser plate are presser Wheels 50 and 5| adapted to operate adjacent the sides of the stop plate and directly on the side edges of the work-pieces. The wheels 58 and 5| are rotatably mounted on spindles 52 and 53 carried by arms 54 and 55 that are fixed on a rod 58 extending in parallel relation with the tie rod 38 and oscillatably carried in a lug 51 projecting upwardly from the table 8 at the' side thereof adjacent the post 5. The arms are fixed to the rod and the rod is adapted to oscillate within a bearing lug responsive to pressure of a spring 58 carried by the lug and having pressing contact with the free end of the arm 54.

In adjusting the regulating device, the stop plate is raised or lowered so that the iingers thereof are spaced above the upper surface of the feed belts a sufficient distance to pass the work-pieces one at a time. This is accomplished by loosening the wing nut 33 and adjusting the thumb screw 26. After the adjustment, the wing nut is retightened to hold the plate in adjusted position. It is thus apparent that when the workpieces are placed on the belt in overlapped relation they will be carried thereby toward the stop plate.

Upon contact with the presser plate, the leaves of the work-pieces will be pressed down against the belts so that the leaves will not catch the depending lingers of the stop plate. The next upper work-piece, however, will engage against the presser plate and raise it against tension. of its spring 48 so that the Work-piece can move into stopped engagement with the stop plate. During movement of the presser plate, the fingers thereon move in the spaces between the ngers of the stop plate and remain in pressing contact with the work-piece. As soon as the underneath work-piece has cleared the stop, the upper workpiece is pressed by the wheels 58 and 5| against the belts 1 and 8 so that it follows the first.

A time interval is required for the upper workpiece to move o-i the end of the iirst and into feeding relation with the belts 1 and 8 so that there is a small space effected between the tablets as they are fed in successive order by the forwarding belts to the stripping mechanism, but this spacing is soon closed and it often happens that the forward ends of the trailing work-pieces will override the rear ends of the advanced workpieces before they reach the belts i6 and l1, since the belts I6 and I1 are driven at less speed than the belts 1 and 8.

As above pointed out, suicient space is required to accommodate the severing device (not shown), which cuts the stripping material applied by the stripping mechanism. In order to overcome this difficulty and provide spaces for the severing mechanism, I find it necessary to positively maintain said spacing of the work-pieces a predetermined amount.

This is accomplished by providing the table 2 with a slotted opening 64 aligning with the spacing between the belts 1 and 8, and mounted in the opening is an endless belt G5. The belt preferably includes a chain operable over sprockets 65 and 51, the sprocket 6l being rotatable about the axis of a stud 68 having a threaded end 89 engaging in a threaded socket 1G formed in the frame 4, and which projects horizontally in parallel, spaced relation with a projecting end 1| of the shaft 12 which rotatably carries a pulley 13 supporting the rear end of the lower forwarding belt l1.

Sleeved on the stud is a bushing 14 for rotat ably mounting a sleeve-like hub 15 of a drive sprocket 16, later described, the sleeve-like hub 15 being retained in rotative relation on the bushing by means of a washer 11 sleeved over the reduced threaded end 18 of the stud and which is rigidly engaged against the end of the bushing by a nut 19 threaded on the reduced eX- tension 18. The sprocket 51 has a bearing opening 88 to freely accommodate the sleeve-like hub 15 and is rotatable thereon responsive to rotation of the sprocket 18, as now to be described.

The sprocket 18 is rigidly keyed to the sleevelike hub by means of a pin 8i in alignment with a sprocket 82 keyed to the shaft 12 and operating over the respective sprockets is a driving chain 83. It is thus obvious that when the shaft 12 is rotated the chain 83 simultaneously drives the sprocket 18 through the sprocket 82, which drive is continuous as long as the shaft 12 is in operation.

The sprocket 61, however, is frictionally connected in driving relation with the sprocket 16 by means of a slip clutch generally designated 84, and which includes friction washers 85 and 86 engaging the respective sides of the sprocket 81 and which are normally retained in frictional engagement therewith by means of washers 81 and S8 engaging the outer side faces of the friction washers. The washer 88 is rigidly connected with the sleeve-like hub 15 while the washer 81 is freely slidable thereon responsive to the pressure of springs 89 that are arranged in circular series about the axis of rotation of the sprockets and have their ends bearing against the washer 81 and against the hub of the sprocket 16. The springs are supported by sleeving them over pins 8S fixed within the hub of the sprocket 18 and which have free ends engaged in aligning openings 9i in the washer 81 so that the washer 81 is slidably 75 lchain be1t 65. within a slot 92 in an arm 93 that is fixed to `for selected pairs of links.

`mounted on the pins in driving relation with the 'sprocket 1S.

thus obvious that when the sprocket 16 is rotated the washer 81 will be carried therewith and the driving contact of the sprocket 61 is maintained by pressure of the springs to effect drive of the The other sprocket S6 rotates the frame il and projects between the belts 1 and S, the sprocket 66 being rotatably mounted on a pin 94 extending across the slot of the arm.

Fixed at spaced points on the chain are lugs 95 and 9E that are adapted to alternately engage against the under face of the tablets at the point where spacing therebetween is effected, as previously described. The lugs 95 and 98 are of identically the same construction and best illustrated in Fig. 6. They include block-like bodies 91 having slots 98 to form spaced arms 99 and Iil engaging the sides of the belt and which are pivoted to the projecting ends of connecting pins lill The lugs have flat, forward faces IGZ to engage against the rear edge of the work-pieces, and rear faces |03 curved from the rear edge of the arms 99 and |00 to the "forward faces iii? so as to provide entering edges #Elli to engage between the space that is afforded by :the spacing of the work-pieces. The lugs hang loosely from the lower run of the belt, as shown in ilig. 3, and move to a horizontal position as they are carried forwardly over the periphery of the sprocket G6 until the flat forward faces thereof engage under the work-piece that is being mov ed past the stop plate. When this occurs the fiattened ends i IE5 engage the shouldered ends iiiii of the arm 93 to stop movement of the chain.

The work-piece, while engaged by the lug, holds the lug in engagementwith the shoulder to prevent disengagement thereof until the work-piece has passed the stop, however, the sprocket 1% continues to rotate incidental to the frictional driving connection thereof with the sprocket E1.

` As `:soon as the work-piece has passed the stop plate, the block is free to follow the tablet and pivots on the edges |01 of the shoulders |06 to again allow movement of the chain belt.

The entering edge of the lug Wedges between the respective work-pieces, however, movement of the chain belt is slightly faster than the movement of the work-piece so that the forward face thereof is positively retained in contact with the rear edge thereof. Since belts 1 and 8 are driven at a faster speed than the belts I6 and I1, the following work-piece is kept in contact with the opposite face of the lug so that the lug holds the work-pieces in spaced relation corresponding to the thickness of the lug.

'Ihe lugs are so spaced on the chain belt that when one lug is engaging the under face of a work-piece, the opposite lug has moved away from the tablet, as shown in Fig. 3. When a lug is engaged between a pair of adjacent work-pieces, it remains therebetween until it is carried over the periphery of the sprocket 61. While the lug is being moved along the upper run of the belt, the forward face thereof is retained in perpendicular position by engagement of the flattened ends IDE with tracks |08 that are formed on the upper face of the arm 93. By the time one of the lugs has been carried over the periphery of the sprocket 61, the other lug has moved upwardly over the sprocket 66, and is in position to engage between the next succeeding work-pieces, in the'manner as just described.

From the foregoing, it is obvious that the spacing device provides a positive separator or spacer for the adjacent work-pieces so that when they are fed into the stripping mechanism, the spacing provided by the thickness of the lugs is sufcient to freely accommodate the severing device Without causing it to cut into the ends of the workpieces. Since the work-pieces are kept in contact with respective sides of the lugs, the spaces are maintained uniform and there is no waste of stripping material. 'I'he spacing is also kept at a minimum to maintain the capacity of the machine at its fixed maximum. Overriding of the work-pieces is also prevented, and they are retained in close contact with the table and forwarding belt.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces, a spacing member cooperating with the conveyor for spacing the work-pieces, means for movingv the spacing member into and out of spacing contact with the work-pieces whereby the spacing between the work-pieces is maintained uniform incidental to Vthe width of said spacing member, means including a frictional driving connection with the conveyor for driving said spacing member moving means, and means engageable with the spacing member for detaining movement of said moving means, said spacing member being retained in said engagement with the detaining means by said work-pieces and releasable when one of the work-pieces passes said spacing member to effect movement of said spacing member moving means.

2. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, forwarding means for feeding work-pieces in single formation, means cooperating with the feeding conveyor to separate the work-pieces for individual delivery tothe forwarding means, means cooperating with said forwarding means for maintaining a uniform spacing between the workpieces on said forwarding means, means for actuating the spacing means, and means for latchingly engaging the spacing means, said spacing means being releasable from said latching means under control of the work-pieces.

3. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, a forwarding conveyor in receiving relation with said feeding conveyor for feeding the work-pieces in single formation, means cooperating with the feeding conveyor to separate the work-pieces on the forwarding conveyor, a spacing member, means movably supporting the spacing member for movement between the work-pieces to maintain a uniform spacing between the respective work-pieces on the forwarding conveyor, means for engaging the spacing member to stop movement of said spacing member supporting means, and means mounting the spacing member on said supporting means for release from said stop means under control of the work-pieces.

4. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, a forwarding conveyor in receiving relation with said feeding conveyor for feeding the work-pieces in single formation, means cooperating with the feeding conveyor to separate the work-pieces on the forwarding conveyor, a spacing member,

means movably supporting `the spacing member for movement between the work-pieces to maintain a uniform spacing between the respective work-pieces on the forwarding conveyor, means for moving said support including a driving connection with' the forwarding conveyor having a slip clutch connection with said support, means for engaging the spacing member to stop movement of said spacing member supporting means, and means mounting the spacing member on said supporting means for release from said stop means when a work-piece has passed the spacing member.

5. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, regulating means supported above the feeding conveyor to pass the work-pieces one at a time, a forwarding conveyor supported in receiving relation with the feeding' conveyor, an endless belt, spacing members carried by said belt, means supporting a run of said belt in the path of the work-pieces carried by the forwarding conveyor, means for driving said belt to carry the spacing members into and out of spacing engagement with the work-pieces, and means alternately engageable with the spacing members for stopping movement of the belt until a work-piece has passed the engaged spacing member.

6. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, regulating means supported above the feeding conveyor to pass the work-pieces one at a time, a forwarding conveyor supported in receiving relation with the feeding conveyor, an endless belt,

spacing members carried by said belt, means vsupporting a run of said belt in the path of the means supported above the feeding conveyor to pass the work-pieces one at a time, a forwarding conveyor supported in receiving relation with the feeding conveyor and operable at a different speed than the feeding conveyor, an endless belt, spacing members carried by said belt, means supporting a run of said belt in the path of the work-pieces carried by the forwarding belt, means for driving said belt to carry the spacing members into position for maintaining space between the work-pieces at the time they are delivered from the feeding conveyor to the forwarding conveyor including a slip clutch in said driving connection to synchronize movement of the spacing members with the work-pieces, and means alternately engageable with the spacing members for stopping movement of the belt until a work-piece has passed the engaged spacing member.

8. In combination with means for advancing work-pieces in a continuous path, a spacing member for spacing the work-pieces, means for moving' the spacing member into and out of spacing contact with the work-pieces whereby the spacing between the work-pieces is maintained uniform incidental to the width of said spacing member, and means for stopping said moving means until a work-piece has passed the spacing member.

9. In combination with a conveyor for feeding work-pieces in overlapped formation, regulating means supported above the feeding conveyor to pass the work-pieces one at a time, a forwarding conveyor supported in receiving relation with the feeding conveyor, an endless belt, a spacing member carried by said belt, means supporting a run of said belt in the path of the work-pieces carried by the forwarding belt, means for driving said belt to carry the spacing member into and out of separating engagement with the work-pieces including a slip clutch in said driving connection to synchronize movement of the spacing member with the workpieces, and means on said belt supporting means for engaging said spacing member to stop the belt until a work-piece has passed the spacing member.

DIETRICH DANEKE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2442179 *Oct 21, 1942May 25, 1948Dewey And Almy Chem CompCrown closure lining machine
US2772717 *Sep 21, 1954Dec 4, 1956Chicago Mill And Lumber CompanMethod and apparatus for making paper covered wood veneer assemblies
US2828126 *Dec 16, 1954Mar 25, 1958Raymond A LabombardeSheet feeding apparatus and method
US3151863 *Mar 29, 1962Oct 6, 1964Monroe Internat CorpControl for card feed
US8104763Mar 26, 2010Jan 31, 2012United States Postal ServiceDouble inhibit mechanism
DE1029282B *Jun 28, 1956Apr 30, 1958Maschb Burg Burg Bez MagdeburgDosiergefaess fuer grobkoerniges Gut
WO2009038569A1 *Sep 25, 2007Mar 26, 2009Thomas C PotterDouble inhibit mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification271/35
International ClassificationB65G59/06, B65G47/28, B65G47/29
Cooperative ClassificationB65G47/29, B65G59/067, B65G2811/0631, B65G2201/02
European ClassificationB65G59/06D, B65G47/29