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Publication numberUS2116513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1938
Filing dateFeb 13, 1936
Priority dateFeb 13, 1936
Publication numberUS 2116513 A, US 2116513A, US-A-2116513, US2116513 A, US2116513A
InventorsWilliam P Frankenstein
Original AssigneeWilliam P Frankenstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible carton
US 2116513 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 1. l. ...v 1, Y ,m 2m E. wwf s m w W Mm mmh d amm .cm w

May l0, 1938.

May 10, 1938. w. F. FRANKENSTEIN v 2,116,513

COLLAPS IBLE CARTON Filed Feb. 13, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

BY Wwf; Ww( ATTORNEY# 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 na Illlllrfllllllillllll.

INVENTOR.

)fm/ 91M ATTORNEYS.

May 10, 193s,

v W. P. FRANKENSTEIN .COLLAPS IBLE CARTON Filed Feb. 15, 1956 enema May 1c, 193s' UNITED "STATES COLLAPSIBLE CARTON William P. Frankenstein, Cincinnati, Ohio Application February 13, 193s, serial Nn. 63,758

3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in collapsible or knock-down boxes for a full display of the contents thereof, the contents being coniined therein by a transparent wrapping sheet envelopy ing the open or face side of the carton or by a windowed slide sleeve as a. removable closure for the carton. I'he carton is of hollow or double wall formation to give a framing width dimension thereto, thereby materially adding to the attractiveness oi the package, as well as increasing its strength and cushioning thel contents to protect the same against injury in shipping or handling.

An object of the invention is to provide a double or hollow wall, collapsible or knock-down carton which can be easily and conveniently erected, several walls of which are erected rby merely swinging the same from their flat, knock-down position to the perpendicular, and locking the 0 same in their erected position in `erecting adjoining walls.

Another object of the invention is to provide a double or hollow wall, collapsible or knock-down carton, the double wall structure increasing the strength of the box, cushioning the contents to prevent its injury, more eiiiciently packaging the contents against deterioration and spoil, and permitting the use of a lighter Weightpaperboard material in the manufacture of the carton, bringing about its reduction in cost.

Various other features and advantages will be more fully set forth in a description of the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the improved carton in erected position, with the upper open face side sealed by a slip-in cover. l

Figure 2 is a perspective view similar to Figure l with the carton enveloped with a transparent sheet wrapper for a full view of the contents.

Figure 3 is a section on line 3-3, Figure 1,

Figure 4 is a section on line 4 4, Figure 2. n

Figure 5 is a plan view of the carton blank with one of the double side walls folded to its knockdown position, with the inner wall thereof at its longitudinal edge adhesively secured to the upper or inner side of the carton bottom.

Figure 6 is a plan View of the closure blank employed in sealing the contents of the carton, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 3.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of the carton in a partially erected condition. 1 l v Figure 8 is a. view similar to Figure 7, showing the same in a further stage of erection.

Figure 9 is a section through a corner of the carton partially erected.

Figure 10 is an inside perspective view of a corner of the carton completely' erected.

Figure 1l is a section on line iI-i I, Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a section on line IZ-IZ, Figure 10.

Figure 13 is a central section through'an end portion of a modified form of carton.

Figure 14 is a perspective view of a modifiedform of carton closure.

Referring to the drawings, particularly .Figure 5, a carton blank formed` of a single sheet of paperboard material is disclosed, died or cut out to a definite outline coniiguration, punched and score marked or lined to provide a panel or bottom i for thecarton and, in the blank,llocated intermediatelyV thereof and, as illustrated, rectangular, boundedvby the score lines 2 and joining with the opposite side walls 3 3 and vopposite end WallsIl-I.' i

The oppositeside walls 3-3 are of duplicate formation Iand therefore will be described in the singular, each as a side extension of the panel,

' subdivided.bynscore lines into a plurality of wall sections,. consisting of a pair of companion wall sections, as an outer wall section 5 and an inner wall section 5a in parallel arrangement, joined by an intermediate or connecting wall section 5 of a width dimension defined by a spacing of parallel score lines 'l-A-'i hingedly joining the wall sections,5, 5, adapting the same, when erected, to provide a double or tubular side wall.

The outer side Wall section 5 joins or is in immediate connection with the bottom I and folds at an angle Athereto on the score line 2, dividing the bottom l'and outer wall section 5. The outer wall sectionV 5, when the sections are erected, is located at the outer side of the carton, while the inner wall section 5a is at the inner side, over the bottom, to which it is permanently adhesively secured.

The connecting wall section 6, when the wall sections are erected, bridges the same and forms thetop face for the double wall. The inner wall section 5, along its longitudinal extremity, has a pasting flap 8 extended therefrom, folding along a scoreline 9, dividing the flap from the wall section. Thepasting flap, in the manufacture of the'box, is permanently adhesively secured to the upper side ofthe bottom and extends inwardlyl thereof for convenience in machine pasting and securing. This presents the wall sections 5 and lia in a knock-down condition of the carton, in a superposed relation with the inner wall section 5* and including the connecting wall section E, in a plane parallel with the bottom, in an overlapped Bussum position thereof, as shown in Figure 5, for one of the double side walls.

The wall sections land 5l, at their opposite longitudinal ends or extremities, are provided with end wall tucking ilaps I I--I I. and I2I2 respectively. 'I'he tucking flaps Il and I2, for the respective wall sections, are shown relatively of different length, which feature, however, is merely arbitrary. The tucking flaps II and I2 fold or bend inwardly in erecting the walls at right angles to the wall sections, of which they form an extension, each along a score line I3.

'I'he tucking flaps I2-I2, projecting from the relative opposite ends of the inner wall section 5", respectively at their inner side or edge, are each provided with a spacing flapA I4 longitudinally therewith and foldable along a score line I5 at right angles to the tucking ilap, of which they are a part, to extend inwardly of the top edge of the flap in the erected position of the walls and in a parallel relation to the bottom, to serve as a spacer for the wall sections of an-end double the wall sections self-assume their spaced relation to form a hollow wall structure.

The opposite end walls of the carton, as the side walls, are of duplicate formation and therefore will be described in the singular, each as an end extension of the panel, subdivided by score lines into a plurality of wall sections, comprising a pair of wall sections designated according to the relative positions they assume when the carton is erected. Thus are provided 'an outer wall section I6, immediately joining with the bottom I, and an inner wall section I6?, of lesser longitudinal dimension than its companion wall section I6, joining therewith by an intermediate connecting wall section II, divided from the connected wall sections by spaced parallel score lines Iii-I8,

, along which the several walls fold respectively in the wall erection.

The intermediate or connecting wall section I1,

Y at its opposite longitudinal ends, is cut angularly to give a miter corner joint effect to the top'marf gins or vwidth Afaces of the hollow walls-when the carton is erected, as shown in Figures 1 and 2."

The inner wall section I6, at'each of its opposite longitudinal ends, is respectively provided withav pair of flaps I9 and 20. The ap I9V quali'- iles as a spacer flaps for the' wall sections I6^and IIBa and folds inwardly at right angles to the inner' y tionally secure.

wallfsection I6a to extend vbetween-the inner and outer wallsections I6, I6a and beneath the spacer .flap "Il on a tueklng 'ap I2 of .a side wall section.

The flap 2l) providesaY locking liap 'engaging 'into a slot 2| inv an adjoining'end'of an inner walll section 5%' of a double side wall. .A'notch isvcut Y sothat-the tailing formed thereby is not completely cut out,` this' Vfeaturebeing offadvantage inbracing the locking flap 20 when engaged into the notch, making the locking connection addi- YThe inner wall .section IBa,

spacer flap 22, folded at right angles to the inner wall section II, to which it joins along a score line 2l, and in an outward direction directly over lthe bottom I to lie between the inner and outer wall sections. The various spacing flaps mate'- rially reinforce the double wall structure and limit outward movement oi' the inner wall section I6L when the wall sections are erected, and, with the aid of the locking flap, oder rigidity tothe hollow wall structure.

'I'he aps act as struts, connecting the inner and outer wall sections, and administer a binding pressure to the locking ilaps when engaged into their respective notches. The locking flaps also secure the inner wall section against upward displacement, which in turn prevents outward swing of the side walls sustained in their erected position by the tucking flaps I I and I2 projected within the hollow oi' an adjoining end wall.

By omitting thespacer naps from the several wall sections, the tucking flaps and wall sections can be brought intimately together, as illustrated in Figure 13, thereby forming a plural ply wall, which somewhat simplies the assembly or erection, and in such case the spacer ap 22 is turned inwardly in edge-abutting contact with an en'd cross edge of a pasting iiap 8.

'I'he carton can be wrapped, closed or enveloped in various ways, several methods being herein disclosed. These methods are selective to meet trade preferences, kinds of goods packed, carton sizes.

In Figures 1 and 3 the carton is provided with a removable closure 24, illustrated in detail Figure 6, constituting a single sheet of paperboard ma. terial cut to an outline configuration to form a rectangular panel bounded by tucking flaps 25. 'I'he tucking aps are folded at right angles to the panel and the closure applied to the carton by inserting the flaps between the inner side of the walls of the carton and the merchandise, as illustrated in Figure 3. The closure panel is shown solid, although it may contain a windowed opening by cutting an opening in the panel and screening the same with a transparent sheet adhesively secured to the underside of the panel across the opening.

Figures 2 and 4 disclose a transparent sheet wrapping 26 as a closure for -the carton, which spreads over the open top thereof and about the exterior o1' the side walls, lapping over the marand l" gins of the exterior side of the bottom'to which it is ladhesively secured. properly app1ied, hermetically seals the contents within the carton, aswell as furnishes a full view ofthe contents, or an upper layer therein 'when `plural there packed.` It will be observed l lfrom-'Figure '4 that the-,paperboard closure 24 Ais utilized as afliner for`the-carton.

Figure 14' discloses the carton as enclosed by This method, lwhen a windowed `sleeve,4 siidably engaged over the Carton.

'.Io erect'the carton from itsiiat .or knock-down condition, the scaper flaps I! on the tucking ilaps I5 ofthe iiouble'sde'walls are'bent upwardly -to a vertical "In `Afact', "all of the tuclringA andfhe'ldcrechbyone hand of the operator, or. may .be inserted into a holding blockl or cage to allow the use of both hands,

in erecting the end walls. The tuckingilaps, at one endof the carton, are then-'turned inwardly or at right angles to the side-walls, whereupon the end wail sections are folded'upwardiy, bringing the inner end wail section I6* inwardly and then in an arc downwardly and outwardly about the tucking flaps III2 until the locking flaps 20' are brought into interlocked position with the I notches 2 I The extended spacing of the wall sections adds materially to the appearance ofthe package when viewed from the top open side thereof, providing a marginal border around the contents, available for printing or embellishment in color to increase its esthetic value.

The double wall formation provides an insulating space surrounding the contents, and by wrapping or enveloping the carton with a transparent non-moisture penetrating sheet adhesively sealed, the contents is very eiectively protected from the atmosphere, thereby holding the freshness of an edible product packaged therein for a longer period. The double wall structure enables the carton to be manufactured from an exceedingly thin or light-weight paper or cardboard stock, bearing a lower material cost and of ample durability required for the merchandise packed therein. The structure of the package thus makes it permissible to use a light-weight stock having a high surface finish, not commercially available in heavier grades of stock, which would be required for a `single wall structure of equal tensile strength. 'Ihe higher surface nish renders DOssible the production of higher quality printing or lithographing.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A carton made from a single sheet blank of card or paperboard material, comprising, a rectangular panel forming the bottom of the carton, extensions respectively from each side of the rectangular panel, each extension subdivided intol sections by parallel scored lines, along, which the sections are folded for erecting the same into a hollow wall of spaced inner and outer wall sections, an intermediate wail section joining said inner and outer wall sections, and a flap section joining with the inner wall section for overlying the bottom panel, the flaps for two opposed side walls of the carton permanently secured to the bottom panel and the flaps for the end walls respectively folded to overlie the bottom panel and provide a spacer for the inner and outer wall sections, the inner wall sections for the two opposed end walls of the carton of lesser longitudinal dimensions than their relative outer wall sections, and the intermediate tions, an intermediate wall section joining said inner and outer wallsections, and a flap section joining with the inner wall section for overlying the bottom panel, the flaps for two opposed side walls of the carton permanently secured to the bottom panel and the aps for the end lwalls respectively folded to overlie the bottom panel and provide a spacer for the inner and outer wall sections, the inner wall sections for the two opposed end walls of the carton of lesser longitudinal dimension than their relative outer wall sections, and the intermediate connecting wall sections thereof having their opposite ends cut on a bias, and tabs at the opposite ends of said inner wall sections of the end walls of the carton, foldable for respectively spacing the inner and outer wall sections when the walls are erected.

3. A carton made from a single sheet blank of card or paperboard material, comprising, a rectangular panel forming the bottom of the carton,

`extensions respectively from each side of the rectangular panel, each extension subdivided into sections by parallel scored lines, along which the sections are folded for erecting the same into a hollow wall of spaced inner and outer wall sections, an intermediate wall section joining said inner and outer wall sections, and a flap section joining with the inner wall section for overlying the bottom panel, the flaps for two opposed side walls of the carton permanently secured to the bottom panel and the flaps for the end walls respectively folded to overlie the bottom panel and provide a spacer for the inner and outer wall sections, the inner wall sections for the two op posed end Walls of the carton of lesser longitudinal dimension than their relative outer wall sections, and the intermediate connecting wall sections thereofhaving their opposite ends cut on a bias, and locking tabs at the opposite ends of said inner wall sections of the end Walls of the carton, interlocking with an inner wall section respectively of the side walls of the carton.

WILLIAM P. FRAN'KENSTEIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2447243 *Jan 21, 1941Aug 17, 1948William P FrankensteinDouble-walled foldable carton
US2493189 *Aug 20, 1945Jan 3, 1950Frankenstein William PCarton
US2494234 *Nov 29, 1946Jan 10, 1950Frankenstein William PCarton
US2535056 *Oct 22, 1947Dec 26, 1950Frankenstein William PCarton
US2588377 *Apr 4, 1946Mar 11, 1952William P FrankensteinCarton
US2614746 *Oct 9, 1947Oct 21, 1952William P FrankensteinCarton
US2618887 *Jul 15, 1947Nov 25, 1952Frankenstein William PConvertible carton
US2628012 *May 26, 1950Feb 10, 1953Container CorpPaperboard carton with cover
US2628763 *Jan 3, 1947Feb 17, 1953William P FrankensteinCarton
US2670125 *Mar 19, 1948Feb 23, 1954William P FrankensteinCarton
US2675166 *Jul 9, 1952Apr 13, 1954Container CorpPaperboard container
US2684194 *May 23, 1947Jul 20, 1954William P FrankensteinCarton
US2711677 *Apr 19, 1952Jun 28, 1955Sutherland Paper CoMethod of erecting double walled boxes
US2790589 *Jun 15, 1954Apr 30, 1957Arlington Moore GeorgeTelescopic container
US2806590 *Feb 12, 1954Sep 17, 1957Stein A & CoBelt package
US2860823 *Jun 5, 1952Nov 18, 1958Frankenstein William PCarton
US2875941 *Sep 16, 1955Mar 3, 1959Continental Can CoTray carton
US3182886 *Feb 11, 1963May 11, 1965Ahlen & Akerlund Forpackning ACardboard box
US4105423 *May 2, 1977Aug 8, 1978United States Gypsum CompanyCompact air filter with tubular frame
US4801077 *Jan 19, 1988Jan 31, 1989General Mills, Inc.Combined tray and cover for use in the delivery of food items
US20060202007 *Apr 24, 2006Sep 14, 2006Jeremy CohenFoldable box or tray
US20110101080 *May 5, 2011Chin-Lien HoBox cover
US20140261533 *Mar 14, 2014Sep 18, 2014Barbara BrockCompact Organizer for Cosmetics
WO2007127742A2 *Apr 24, 2007Nov 8, 2007Jeremy CohenFoldable box or tray
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/521, 229/178, 229/172, 229/167
International ClassificationB65D77/20, B65D5/56, B65D5/22, B65D5/20, B65D77/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/2009, B65D5/22, B65D5/566
European ClassificationB65D5/22, B65D5/20A1, B65D5/56D