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Publication numberUS2118359 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1938
Filing dateApr 16, 1937
Priority dateApr 16, 1937
Publication numberUS 2118359 A, US 2118359A, US-A-2118359, US2118359 A, US2118359A
InventorsQuinn Lawrence
Original AssigneeQuinn Lawrence
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 2118359 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. QUINN May 24, 1938.

GAME

Filed April 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet l awe/rm all/U0.

Lawrelwe Q Gamma 5 L. QUINN May 24, 1938.

GAME

Filed April 16, 193'? 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 mmkzuu a E.

BY aif 'Lau/relzoe Ono mags May 24, 1938. UI N 2,118,359

GAME

Filed April 16, 1937 '4 Sheets-Sheet 3 y 1938- L. QUINN 2,118,359

GAME

Filed April 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 gunmen W01 Lawre/z/ce Patented May 24, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFIE 8 Claims.

My invention relates to an improved game mechanism, and more particularly to a game mechanism with which games such as baseball and mushball can be played.

Accordingly, it is an object of my invention to provide an improved game board upon which can be realistically reproduced the playing field of a game such as baseball and upon which the game can be played in a manner closely simulating that of actual play.

It is another object of my invention to provide a novel game mechanism for the playing of a game such as baseball which will, during the course of play, reproduce all the plays possible in an actual game and in approximately the same frequency of occurrence as takes place in actual p ay.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a novel game mechanism, such as that for the playing of a game of baseball, in which the ele ment of chance is utilized to select the various plays possible in an actual game for reproduction in the game being played.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a game mechanism which utilizes a novel combination of spinning disk or other rotating member and electrical means to mutually select and designate a play possible in an actual game for reproduction in the playing of the game.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a novel game mechanism for the playing of a game such as baseball in which a spinning disk is used to designate a play that might occur in an actual playing of the game and in which electrical means operated by the spinning of the disk are utilized to amplify, modify or clarify the play indicated by the disk.

A further object of my invention is to provide a novel game mechanism for the playing of a game such as baseball in which a rotating disk carries upon its face the designations of a plurality of plays which may occur in the actual playing of the game and in which electrical means, such as lights placed about a reproduction of the playing field and illuminated by the rotating disk, are associated with play designations complementary to those appearing on the disk.

Another object of my invention is to provide a game board with novel electrical circuits'and means for opening and closing these circuits actuated by a rotating disk to illuminate lights placed abouta playing field marked on said board for the purpose of designating, modifying or clarifying the play designated by the position in which the rotating disk comes to rest.

A further object of my invention is to provide a game mechanism embodying novel means for rotation of a disk bearing designations of a plu- .5 rality of plays one of which is to be selected by chance each time the disk is operated.

A further object of my invention is to provide a game mechanism of the character described with novel means for recording past plays such as the number of strikes, balls, outs, runs and the. like.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a novel chance element for game mechanisms of the type to be described which will be actuated by the rotating disk and may modify the play as indicated by the disk.

Another and still further object of my invention is to provide a novel game mechanism of the type to be described in which some or all of the 20 lights arranged aboutthe playing, field may'have a double feature use of both indicating a play and the positions of players.

Other and further objects of my invention will appear upon consideration of the detailed description of the embodiment of the invention which follows.

In the drawings, wherein like'reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one form of game board embodying the present invention in which the various elements thereof are shown in their related positions;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of a portion of the surface of the game board shown in Fig. 1 with the rotating disk removed to show the arrangement of the electrical contacts thereunder andthe positioning of the chance elements;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of. one type of rotating disk member with the plays possible in an actual game designated on its face separated by solid and dotted lines for a purpose hereafter to be described and showing the relative positions of the contact arm on its under surface;

Fig. 4 is a section through a portion of the game mechanism of Fig. 1 taken substantially on the line 4-4 showing one embodiment of the novel rotating means and bearing for the rotating disk and illustrating the relative positions of the contact arm and electricalcontacts under the rotating disk;

Fig. 5 is a view of the under surface of the embodiment of the game board shown in Fig. l diagrammatically indicating the electrical circuits utilized in the playing of the game and showing the novel means utilized for rotating the disk;

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional elevation through any one of the lights having a double use showing the novel arrangement of the common ground plate and leads to the filaments;

Fig. '7 is a cross sectional partially exploded view of the novel switching mechanism for indicating the players on base as seen at right angles to its axis of rotation;

Fig. 8 is a view of the mechanism of Fig. '7 as seen along its axis of rotation with the face plate removed;

Fig. 9 is a cross sectional partially exploded view of the novel switching mechanism for indicating plays in the game such as balls, strikes, and outs as viewed at right angles to the axes of rotation of the switching elements; and

Fig. 10 is a view of the mechanism of Fig. 9 as seen along the axes of rotation of the switching elements with the face plate removed.

Although my invention may be utilized in the playing of many types of games, it will be de scribed as a game of baseball with a View to clearly and distinctly indicating the subject matter of my invention.

Referring now to Fig. l, the numeral l0 indicates a suitable surface member for the game mechanism supported by the frame I! and legs l2. Upon surface member In is reproduced, as at i3, a miniature baseball diamond. Upon and around diamond I3 is disposed a plurality of lights 14. Lights it are marked upon the bulbs themselves, or, as in the embodiment illustrated, upon the surface member I!) adjacent the lights, to indicate the play or modification of the play that will be used in the playing of the game when any particular light is illuminated. Adjacent diamond l3, and mounted for rotation relatively to surface member ID, is a disk l5 bearing upon its surface as at I6 (Fig. 3) designations of the various plays possible in an actual game of baseball.

It is to be noted that the designations of the various plays on the disk are separated by solid and dotted lines for a purpose hereafter to be describe-d.

Mounted adjacent rotating disk 55 on surface member it are a fixed play designating pointer i1, and a past play indicator switch actuators l8.

Mounted in or upon surface member if) and semi-circularly arranged under rotating disk !5 are a plurality of contact points 25 (see Figs. 2 and 4) adapted to be successively engaged upon rotation of the disk l5 by the downwardly turned ends of a pair of diametrically opposite contact arms 2! mounted on the under surface of disk l5 as at 22. Contact points 20 are suitably insu lated from one another as by mounting or embedding them in an insulating medium 23. Each contact point 25 is connected by suitable circuits to one or more of the lights 14 in combinations as desired. Electrical energy is supplied to these several circuits from any usual source of supply such as an outlet 25 from which current is taken to a transformer 26 (Fig. 5). rom one pole 2? of the secondary winding of transformer 26 current is conducted by any suitable circuit to the bearing of the rotating disk l5 and thence to the contact arms 2! in the manner next tobe described. Contact arms ZI engaging the contact points 20 close one or more of the circuits to one or more of the several lights it. The several lights I4 are mounted in a common grounding plate 28 (Fig. 6) which is insulated from frame I l by insulators 28 and in turn is connected to the other pole 29 of the secondary of the transformer V 25 to complete the several circuits.

Figs. 2, 4 and 5 show the novel means used to rotate disk l5 and to complete the circuit between the transformer 25 and contact arms 2i. In these figures 35 is a cross member fastened to the frames l l. Affixed thereto as by bolts 3 l, but insulated therefrom, is a bearing member 32 adapted to receive the end of a shaft 33. Shaft 33 passes through a bearing 34 in the insulating medium 23 of surface member l5. Keyed to the top of shaft 33, as at 35, is a tube 33 adapted to pass through a hole let into the center of rotating disk l5 and to be firmly fixed to rotating disk l5 by rings 37. Firmly fixed to shaft 33 between bearings 32 and 3% is a toothed gear member 38. Engaging gear 38 is a rack 39 slidably mounted in brackets 45 and M mounted, respectively, on the under side of surface member if) and the inside of frame ll. Rack 39 is cut away as at 42 to allow free rotation of gear 38. A compression spring 43 is disposed around rack 39 between bracket l and a shoulder M fixed to rack 39. The rack 39 is actuated by any suitable means such as a knob 45. Current is taken from transformer 26 to contact arms 2| by any suitable circuit electrically connected to bearing member 32 by the bolt 46. From the bearing member the current passes upward through shaft 33 to tube 36 and thence to rings 31 and outward therefrom through the junction 22 to the contact arms 2!.

Figs. 9 and 10 show in section one embodiment of my novel past play indicating means which are secured to frame II by bolts 4'! as shown in Figs. 1 and 5. In. Figs. 9 and 10, 48 represents a face plate for the past play indicator which is clamped against frame member II by the bolts 41. Carried by bolts 41 is back plate 59. 'Carried on bolts 41 between plates 48 and 49 is a slab of insulating material 50 circularly bored. through as at 5|. Passing through plates 48 and 49 and suitably insulated therefrom and passin centrally through apertures 5| are shafts 52 which may be rotated by knobs l8. Securely fixed to shafts 52 are metal disks 53, preferably of lead, designed to rotate in circular apertures 5| and out of contact therewith. Radially bored in metal disks 53 are chambers 54 designed to carry compression springs 55 and metal ball members 56 which are pressed against the walls of apertures 5| by the action of springs 55. Suitably mounted in the walls of apertures 5i are contact points 51 designed to engage ball members 56 when disks 53 are suitably rotated. It is to be noted that the number of contacts 5'5 and the number of ball members 55 for each of disks 53 are chosen with respect to the play to be indicated by each as for instance there are three contacts 5i and three ball members 56 for the indicator designating balls, and two each for the indicators designating strikes and outs. Now with reference to Figs. 5 and 9 current is led to disks 53 by a suitable conduit 53 here shown as receiving current from transformer 26 through the contact at 46 which was described above. Conduit 58 is electrically connected to shafts 52 by shoes 59 thereby energizing metal disks 53 and ball members 55. From contacts 51 suitable circuits 33 lead to lights 6| which in turn have a common ground 62 here shown as connected to ground plate 28 to complete the several circuits. When in the course of play it is desired to indicate that one ball, strike, or out or any combination of these is to be scored against the batter,

action of springs 13'.

walls of recess 68 are three contacts 15 designed the-appropriate knob or knobs l B are rotated and one or more of ball members 56. brought into contact with the appropriate contacts 51' thereby completing the circuit or circuits to the appropriate light orlights 61 illuminating the light or lights 6! and thereby recording the score against the batter. Contacts 57 and ball members 55 are so arranged with respect to each other in the several switch units that it is possible to score any combination of balls, strikes, and cuts that would occur in the actual playing of the game.

Mounted on frame l adjacent switch actuators l8 (Fig. 5) is switch mechanism 63 similar in construction to those described with reference to Figs; 9 and 10 and designed for use in indicating players on bases. With reference to- Figs. 7 and 8 switch mechanism 63 comprises a face plate 64 and a rear plate 65 secured to frame it by bolts 66. Held between plates 64 and t5 and mounted on bolts 66 is a slab of insulating material 6'! circularly bored asat 658. Passing through plates 64 and 65 and suitably insulated therefrom and rotatable therein and passing centrally through recess 68- is shaft 69 designed to be rotated by knob 10. Secured to shaft 69 and free to rotate within recess 68' is metal disk I! which has four radial chambers I2 let therein as shown. Mounted in chambers are compression springs F3 and ball members 14 designed to be pressed against the walls of recess 68 by the Suitably mounted in the to engage ball members 14 when disk I! is suitably rotated. Current is led to disk- H by conduit it which is electrically connected to conduit 53, above described, and electrically engaging shaft 69 through shoe ll. From contacts 15 circuits .78 lead to one filament in each of the lights M arranged on playing field 13 to represent 1st, 2nd, and 3rd bases. It is now apparent that by appropriate rotation of disk H by knob 10 ball members (4 may be moved to engage contacts 15 and the circuits closed to appropriate lights I4 to designate men on bases in any combination that may occur in the actual playing of the game.

Inspection of the circuit diagram of Fig. 5 will show that the lights M designed to indicate 1st, 2nd, and 3rd bases, and any combination of players thereon, are likewise used to indicate hits.

Thus if the disk l5'indicates a single, double, or triple, the lights at 1st, 2nd, or 3rd bases will light respectively. To the end of avoiding confusion each light M is a double filament light as shown in Fig. 6, one filament being less brilliant than the other and connected to show the position of the player on the base and the more brilliant filament being used to indicate the size of the hit, though the reversein this use may be desirable.

With reference now to Fig. 2, mounted upon insulating medium 23'beneath disk i5 and adjacent contacts is a semi-circular element l9 adjustably secured to insulating medium 23 by slotted arms 8!! and screws 8|. Mounted for rota: tion upon element #9 adjacent the dividing spaces between certain pairs of contacts 20 are a plurality of three-pointed chance elements 82 of conducting material designed to be rotated by contact arms 2! when disk l5 is spun. The points or arms of chance elements 82 are adapted to pass over and in contact with the contacts 20 and are so spaced that it is possible for any two of the points to bridge the two adjacent contacts 26 if the chance element happens to cease rotation with two of its points on these contacts. Thus an additional, element of chance is added to game. For instance, considering the chance element iiznearest pointer I1 in Fig. 2, the contacts 20 adjacent this chance element are those respectively connected to the circuits for the lights I4 on the game board designating Bunt and Out. Therefore, if contact 2| stops after rotationupon the contact for Bunt and the chance element 82 stops rotation with two of its points bridging the contacts Bunt and Out, then the circuit to the Out light will be energized as well as that to the Bunt light and the Bunt play will be modified and the player considered as Out. The same is true of all the other chance elements and. an increase in the number of plays aiforded by the game is had. If, however, the players do not desire to use these additional chance elements 82 then screws 8! may be loosened and element 79 slid away from contacts 20 which acts to remove chance elements 82 from contacting position with adjacent contacts 28. Further, the use of the chance elements 32 affects th reading of the plays indicated on disk i5. As will be seen from Fig. 3, certain of the various plays indicated on disk I 5 are placed in pairs, each pair being separated by a dotted line. If after rotation of the disk but one light E4 on the board is illiuninated (the situation arising when the contact 20 upon which the contact arrnZl comes to rest is not bridged by a chance element 82' with an adjacent contact 29) then the play on disk 55' opposite pointer I7 is alone read and combined with that indicated by the illuminated lamp to obtain the complete play to be made. However, when two lights are illuminated after rotation of disk I5 (the situation when one of the chance elements 82 is bridging two adjacent contacts 26 on one of which the contact arm 2| is resting) then not only the play indicated onv .disk 15 opposite pointer H but also the adjacent play on the other side of'the dotted line are used to complement the play indicated by the lights.

Now let it be supposed that the game board is in readiness for play. The transformer 26 is energized by current from outlet 25. The player grasps knob 35 and draws it away from. frame H against the action of spring 43. At the same time rack 39 engages gear member 38. Upon release of knob 45;. spring 43 forces rack 39 inwardly and rapidly rotates gear member 38 which in turn, through shaft 33 and sleeve member 35, rapidly rotates disk IS. The rotation of disk l5 rotates contact arms 21 rapidly'over contact points 29' and arms 2| rotate chance elements 82 if they are in use. When rack 39 reaches its inward position, gear 38 rotates freely in the cut away portion 32 of the rack-39, the disk l5 and contact arms continuing to rotate until brought to rest by friction. When disk l5 comes to'rest, one of the plays indicated upon its face will lie opposite pointer ll. At the same time, one of contact arms 2! has come to rest on one of the contact points 20 closing one or more circuits to bulbs It. The bulbs l4 whose circuits are completed are then illuminated indicating what amplification, modification or clarification should be made of the play indicated by pointer IT, or vice versa. When the indications of both the disk 95 and the lights i i are combined, the player is advised as to the exact nature of the-play to be made. The arrangement of the contact points 23 and that of the designations on the rotating disk l5 are such that the plays indicated by the combination of the two designations correspond closely in both character and frequency of occurrence to the plays of an actual baseball game.

Now suppose disk I comes to rest with pointer I! indicating Strike, as shown at 83 (Fig. 3). The contact arm 2! then rests on contact point 26a. (Figs. 2 and 5). The contact arrn M then closes the circuit to the bulb l4 marked Strike. The player then rotates the appropriate knob l8 (Fig. 5) of the past play indicator so that one ball member 56 engages the first contact 51. The resulting illuminated light 6! indicates that one strike has been made. The same player then rotates disk l5 again; this time it may stop so that pointer ll indicates Doubled to left field, as shown at 84 (Fig. 3). Contact arms 2| then rest on contact point 20b (Figs. 2 and 5) which close the circuit to light l4 marked 2nd and Double. The play as then indicated by disk l5 and light M is that the batter doubled. The player would then rotate knob ill of the switch mechanism 63 until the lower left-hand ball member 14 in Fig. 8 engaged the contact l5 for the circuit to the other filament of the light 54 at 2nd base. This circuit would then be closed and the lamp would show two degrees of light to indicate a runner on 2nd base as well as the fact that the runner had doubled. The circuit to the double filament of this light would of course be opened immediately upon further rotation of disk I5 by the next player.

The first player having finished his turn at bat the next player rotates disk I5 and suppose disk l5 stops with the play Bunt along 3rd B. line as indicated at 85 (Fig. 3) opposite pointer ll. Then contact arm 2| comes to rest on contact 29c (Figs. 2 and 5) and closes the circuit to the light l4 marked Bunt. But here the chance element 82 adjacent contact 200 may come into play. If this chance element comes to rest with one point on contact 200 and another point on rontact 20d then not only will the circuit to the light 14 marked Bunt be closed but also the circuit to the light l4 marked Error. Therefore, when disk l5 comes to rest two lights on the game board will be illuminated and, as described above, both of the plays in the pair must be read to complete the play. Thus in this instance as the lights Bunt and Error have both lighted, not only the play designation Bunt along 3rd B. line on the disk must be used, but also the other play in the pair Bunt fumbled by pitcher, the result being that the complete play is properly scored by charging the pitcher with an error and rotating knob to indicate a man on first. Thus a combination of plays is possible with the use of chance elements 82 whereas but one play would be had if not used.

One or more persons can play the game as above described. It is preferable to have the players divided into two teams as in an actual game of baseball. If two teams are playing, the players of one team play in rotation, each player spinning the disk until he is either out or on base, and until the team has acquired three outs when the other team has its turn at play, the succession of players and teams being identical to that practiced in the actual game.

There are various modifications of the above described game which will now occur to those who are skilled in the art and which may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. For instance, counters or players may be used upon the reproduction of the baseball diamond on the game board to indicate the players on base or for other purposes. It also is obvious that the game mechanism disclosed may be quickly and easily converted to the playing of games other than baseball, such as mushball or softball, by merely substituting for the rotating disk shown a disk bearing upon its surface indications of the plays possible in mushball or softball. Further, by appropriate rearrangement of the reproduction of the playing field and the lights thereon, and by utilizing a rotating disk bearing appropriate plays, such other games as football can be played upon the above described device. To determine the scope of thepresent invention reference must therefore be had to the appended claims.

This application is a continuation in part of my application, Serial Number 92,854 filed July 27, 1936.

What is claimed is:

1. In a game board apparatus of the type described, a game board, a rotatable disk mounted on said board bearing on its surface a plurality of designations of plays of the game, a plurality of electric lamps mounted upon said game board and associated with play designations complementary to those appearing on said disk, circuits for said lamps, contacts for said circuits beneath said disk on said board, contact arms carried by said disk to engage said contacts and close said circuits, and a plurality of rotatable elements actuated by said contact arms and adapted when at rest in certain positions to bridge certain pairs of said contacts.

2. In a game board apparatus of the type described having a game board with a play bearing rotatable disk mounted on its surface and electric lamps to indicate plays complementary to those appearing on said disk, means carried by said board and rotatedby said disk to at random bridge pairs of said lamps to modify the play that would be otherwise indicated by the at rest position of said disk.

3. In a game board apparatus of the type described, a game board, a rotatable disk on said board having on its surface a plurality of desi nations of plays of the game, a plurality of lamps on said board associated with play designations complementary to those appearing on said disk, circuits for said lamps, contacts for said circuits on said board beneath said disk, contact arms carried by said disk to engage said contacts and close said circuits, and a plurality of three armed rotors carried by said board adjacent certain pairs of said contacts and adapted to be rotated by said contact arms, each of said rotors being so constructed and arranged that upon rotation'the arms thereof pass over and in contact with the two contacts of the particular pair associated therewith, whereby when said rotor comes to rest with its arms bridging said two contacts the lamps in circuit with both contacts will be illuminated should one of the contact arms carried by said disk come to rest upon either of the bridged contacts.

4. In a game board apparatus of the type described, a game board, a disk rotatably mounted with respect to said game board and bearing upon its upper surface a plurality of circumferentially disposed designations of various plays of the game, means fixed with respect to said game board for indicating the play designation of said disk to be used, a plurality of lamps carried by said game board also associated with designations of various plays of the game, a plurality of contact elements electrically connected with said lamps and carried by said game board beneath said disk, and a plurality of contact arms carried by said disk and adapted to close the circuits through said lamps by engagement with said contact elements, the play designations on said disk, the contact arms carried thereby and the contact elements connected to said lamps being so arranged that the play indicated by the lamp or lamps illuminated when the disk is at rest in any given position and that designated on said disk by the indicating means are mutually complementary and when combined define the proper play to be made by the player of the game.

5. In a game board of the type described, a sur face member, a reproduction of a playing field upon said surface member, a rotatable disk mounted on said surface member adjacent said playing field, said disk bearing on its face a plurality of circumferentially disposed designations of the plays possible in an actual game, an index mounted on said surface member adjacent said disk for indicating the play designation to be used when said disk comes to rest after having been rotated, means for rotating said disk, a plurality of lights arranged about said playing field and associated with play designations complementary to the plays designated by said index and disk, circuits for said lights, contact points for said circuits carried by said surface member beneath said rotatable disk, said contacts being arranged to partially cover the circumference of said disk, and a plurality of contact arms carried by said disk to engage said contacts and successively close said circuits upon rotation of said disk.

6. In a game board of the type described, a surface member, a reproduction of a playing field upon said surface member, a rotatable disk mounted on said surface member adjacent said playing field, said disk bearing on its face a plurality of circumferentially disposed designations of the plays possible in an actual game, an index mounted on said surface member adjacent said disk for indicating the play designation to be used when said disk comes to rest after having been rotated, means for rotating said disk, a plurality of lights arranged about said playing field and associated with play designations complementary to the plays designated by said index and disk, circuits for said lights, contact points for said circuits carried by said surface member beneathsaid rotatable disk, said contacts being arranged to cover only half of the circumference of said disk, and a pair of diametrically opposed contact arms carried by said disk to engage said contacts and successively close said circuits upon rotation of said disk.

7. In a game board apparatus of the type described, a game board, a disk'rotatably mounted with respect to said game board and bearing upon its upper surface a plurality of circumferentially disposed designations of .various plays of the game, means fixed with respect to said game board for indicating the play designation of said disk to be used, a plurality of lamps carried by said game board also associated with designations of various plays of the game, a plurality of contact elements electrically connected with said lamps and carried by said game board beneath said disk, a plurality of contact arms carried by said disk and adapted to close the circuits through said lamps by engagement with said contact elements, and means actuated by the movement of said contact arms in an unpredictable manner for bridging certain of said contact elements so as to close'the circuits to more than one of said lamps should one of said contact arms come to rest on one of the bridged contacts, the play designations on said disk, the contact arms carried thereby and the contact elements connected to said lamps being so arranged that the play indicated by the lamp or lamps illuminated when the disk is at rest in any given position and that designated on said disk by the indicating means are mutually complementary and when combined define the proper play to be made by the player of the game.

8. In a game board apparatus of the type adapted for playing a game of baseball, a game board having upon its upper surface a representation of a baseball playing field, lamps carried by said game board including three indicating the positions of first, second and third bases, each of said three lamps having two filaments, a disk rotatably mounted on said game board and adapted to indicate by the position in which it comes to rest certain plays of the game, a plurality of contact members carried by said game board beneath said disk including three each of which is electrically connected to one of the filaments of one of said three lamps, means carried by said disk for engaging said contact elements and closing the electrical circuits through the said three filaments connected to the latter to indicate one, two and three base hits, and a selectively operable switch having three fixed contacts each electrically connected to one of the other filaments of said three lamps for indicating the presence 01- men on bases.

LAWRENCE QUINN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435141 *May 31, 1944Jan 27, 1948Wolgen CompanyAmusement game
US2696384 *Aug 5, 1950Dec 7, 1954Velleda F RothSimulated baseball game
US2811362 *Jan 23, 1956Oct 29, 1957Emanuel BareitherChance controlled game apparatus
US2998975 *Dec 1, 1960Sep 5, 1961Cadaco Ellis IncGame
US3227453 *Feb 19, 1963Jan 4, 1966George A SwartzSimulated ball game apparatus
US4283052 *Oct 26, 1979Aug 11, 1981Windisch Anthony JElectronic amusement apparatus and circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.1, 273/142.00B
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4B