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Publication numberUS2119807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1938
Filing dateJan 7, 1936
Priority dateJan 7, 1936
Publication numberUS 2119807 A, US 2119807A, US-A-2119807, US2119807 A, US2119807A
InventorsFarley Myron M
Original AssigneeFarley Myron M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel and arch cushion and support
US 2119807 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 193s. M. M. FARLEY 2,119,807

HEEL AND ARCH CUSHION AND SUP'PORT Original Eiled Jan. 7, 1936 y fl/fill@ Inventor A llomeysf Patented June 7, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE l HEEL AND ARCH clriolm AND SUPPORT y Application January 7, 1936, ySerial No. 57,999 Renewed December 9, 1937 3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in foot braces that are commonly known as arch supports and cushions.

The present invention consists in the provision of a support for the arch and heel that may be easily inserted or removed from the shoe and which will tend to cushion the foot against shocks normally incident to walking and to effect a massaging of the foot at the arch and heel thereof in a manner tending to strengthen the muscles of the legs and the feet.

The invention together with its utility, and advantages will be best understood from a study of the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the support and cushion.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view thereof.

Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional through the support and cushion.

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional View taken substantially on the line 4--4 of Figure 1, and

Figure 5 is a transverse sectional View taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 1.

Referring to the drawing by reference numerals it .will be seen that the invention comprises a main body 5 of latex, sponge rubber or other sufficiently yieldable material and which is cut, shaped and dimensioned to conform to the shape of the foot, and to extend from a point beginning at the forward end of the metatarsal bones and continuing back to the heel of the foot.

Formed integral with the body 5 is an upstanding flange 6, in the form of a counter to act as a support for the heel at the sides and back of the latter.

'Ihe arch portion of the body 5 is provided with an enlargement 'I projecting upwardly from the top surface of the body 5 and tapering in all directions as will be clear from a study of Figures 3 and 5.

At what may be termed the metatarsal end thereof the body 5 has a feathered edge as indicated at 8.

The portion of the body 5 which rests under the metatarsal bones of the foot is also substantially wedge shaped in cross section as shown in Figure 4 having its top surface inclined as shown.

Covering 9 is mounted on the upper surface of the body 5. This covering 9 is formed from leather or other suitable flexible material which, while permitting the arch support to assume under pressure the shape desired, will also serve to resist Wear.

The body 5 and cover 9 are also apertured so View (Cl. Sti-'71) as to provide air pasages l extending therethrough from the bottom to the top of the support.

Secured to the under side of the body at the forward edge thereof and positioned substantially centrally between the side edges of the arch support is a pad Il also formed preferably of the same material as the body 5. The pad Il is of the edge contour shown and tapers longitudinally having its thickest end at the widest part of the pad as is clear from a study of Figure 3. In transverse section the pad is somewhat oval as shown in Figure 4 having its top and bottom surfaces convexed and sloping in reverse direction toward the respective opposite edges of the pad.

The pad Il is provided to exert additional pressure and present additional support centrally of the ball of the foot so as to relieve the wearer of pain resulting at this point.

In actual practice the arch support is positioned in the shoe with the body faced downwardly so that the foot will engage the leather covering 9. In practice the arch support will support and cushion the arch and heel portion of the foot.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. In a heel and arch support, a main cushioning body having a counter integral with the heel portion of the body and extending forwardly to the 'forward edge of the arch portion of the body, said body having an enlargement projecting upwardly from the top surface thereof and vtapering in thickness in all directions, and said body at the forward edge of the arch portion thereof being substantially wedge shaped in cross section and also substantially wedge-shaped in longitudinal section, and a pad secured to the underl surface of the main cushioning body and formed of the same material as said body; said pad being disposed substantially centrally between the side edges of the main cushioning body and having an end edge projecting beyond the forward edge of said body, said pad further being substantially wedge-shaped in longitudinal section with its smaller end extended inwardly under the wedgeshaped body.

2. In a heeland arch support, a main cushioning body having a counter integral with the heel portion of the body and extending forwardly to the forward edge of the arch portion of the body, said body having an enlargement projecting upwardly from the top surface thereof and tapering in thickness in all directions, and said body at the forward edge of the arch portion thereof being substantially Wedge shaped in cross section, and a pad secured to the under surface of the main cushioning body and formed of the same material as said body; said pad being disposed substantially centrally between the side edges of the main cushioning body and having an end edge projecting beyond the forward edge of said body, said pad tapering longitudinally and having its thickened portion at its projecting end edge, and said pad also having top and bottom surfaces substantially convexed in cross section.

3. In a heel and arch support, a main cushioning body having a counter integral with the heel portion of the body and extending forwardly to the forward edge of the arch portion of the body, said body having an enlargement projecting upwardly from the top surface thereof and tapering in thickness in all directions, and said body at the forward edge of the arch portion thereof being substantially wedge shaped in cross section, and a pad secured to the under surface of the main cushioning body and formed of the same material as said body; said pad being disposed substantially centrally between the side edges of the main cushioning body and having an end edge projecting beyond the forward edge of said body, said pad tapering longitudinally and having its thickened portion at its projecting end edge, and said pad also having top and bottom surfaces substantially convexed in cross section, and a wear covering of exible material secured to the top side of said main cushioning body.

MYRON M. FARLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458501 *Jan 30, 1946Jan 11, 1949George E BurfordFoot supporting device for shoes
US4179826 *Dec 9, 1977Dec 25, 1979Davidson Murray RFoot cushioning device
US4747410 *Sep 3, 1987May 31, 1988Cohen Lee SCushioned anti-pronation insert
US4910886 *Nov 30, 1988Mar 27, 1990Sullivan James BShock-absorbing innersole
US4979318 *May 15, 1989Dec 25, 1990The Dr. Cohen Group, Inc.Orthotic
US5015427 *Feb 21, 1989May 14, 1991Happi, Inc.Process for making an orthotic footwear insert
US5778562 *Oct 12, 1995Jul 14, 1998Lory Orthopadie Schuhtechnik Gesundheitsforum Service Und HandelsOrthopedic support for shoes
US5787610 *May 22, 1997Aug 4, 1998Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear
US6041524 *Oct 5, 1998Mar 28, 2000Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear having recessed heel cup
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6854198May 15, 2001Feb 15, 2005Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7028419Dec 8, 2003Apr 18, 2006Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc.Footwear
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
US8166674Aug 3, 2009May 1, 2012Hbn Shoe, LlcFootwear sole
US20120117818 *Nov 15, 2010May 17, 2012Slowik Paul TOrthotic insert for decreased forefoot loading
US20130232814 *Mar 9, 2012Sep 12, 2013Jonathan A. BlumSport orthotics
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/141, 36/37
International ClassificationA43B21/00, A43B21/32
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32
European ClassificationA43B21/32