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Publication numberUS2121275 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1938
Filing dateMay 3, 1935
Priority dateMay 3, 1935
Publication numberUS 2121275 A, US 2121275A, US-A-2121275, US2121275 A, US2121275A
InventorsBenjamin Zober, Thomas Garvey
Original AssigneeBenjamin Zober, Thomas Garvey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Colloid mill
US 2121275 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 193s. 2,121,275

` B.. zoBER ET A1.

COLLOID MILL Filed May 3, 1935 27a 3 Sheets-Sheet l 70B ATTORNEY.

Jne 21,l 1938. B. zoBER Er AL GOLLOID MILL Fjled May 3, I1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY.

June 2l, 1938. B. zoBER ET AL coLLoID MILL Filed May 3, 1935 3 Sheets-sheet s INVENTRS Vw PW A ORNEY Patented June 21, 1938 PATENT oFFlcl-z ooLLom MILL Benjamin Zuber, Brooklyn', and Thomas Garvey, Long Island City, N. Y.

lApplication May s, 1935, serial' No. 19,622

Claims.

The main object of this invention is to provide a colloid mill in which horizontal or vertical rotor stones and other members cooperate with oscillating stators. 5y Another object of the invention is to provide a colloid mill which is so constructed as to obtain a uniformity of fllin thickness ofthe medium being ground in accordance with the necessity to prevent undue wear scoring of the rotor and stator surfaces and also to combine the hydraulic shear of the colloid mill with the shearing action of the attrition mill.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a colloid mill which is so'constructed as to limit a very large amount of Vibration so that the mechanical features of the colloid mill are proportionately and efficiently increased.

The above and other objects will become apparent in the description below in which characters of reference refer to like-named parts in the drawings.

Referring briefly to the drawings Figure 1 is a 1 longitudinal, sectional, elevational view of the preferred type of colloid mill.

Figure 2 is a top plan view of Figure l. Figure 3 is a partial, sectional, elevational View of a modified type of colloid mill.

Figure 4 is a planl view of a reenforced sintered stone, showing how said sintered stone is fused into dove-tailed ribs of holder.

Figure 5 is a cross-section view on line 5-5 Figure 4 of same stone-holder and stone.

Figure 6 shows a sectional view at line 6--6 of Figure 4.

Referring in detail to the drawings the numeral I0, indicates an inlet head which is driven by an eccentric sleeve II. A bearing I2, is provided which is made adjustable byl being threaded in the housing 32, of the device. This bearing I2, is 40 adjusted by means of a hand lever I3. Said bearing I2 is adjusted by means of said hand lever I3 rotating said bearing I2. The downward motion of the bearing I2, transmits pressure thru the medium of a thrust bearing I5, eccentric sleeve II, and a self aligning thrust bearing I6. The thrust bearing is provided for the accommodation of the oscillating inlet I0, and the water cooled oscillating stator stone I1. A pinion gear I8, driven by means of motor or a belt or other desired apparatus rotates a beveled gear I9. Said beveled gear I9, rotates the eccentric sleeve II. This g/ear I9, is secured to member II, thru means of a key 26, which latter is secured in place in a suitable groove by a screw 2|. The gear I9, has a ring 22, secured .thereto by screws 23, and

this ring retains the gear in position on member Il. The key 20, is free to move vertically in its channel in the gear I9, when this movement is desired. The eccentric sleeve II, is retained in place by a threaded collar 24, which engages said 5 eccentric sleeve intermediate its length. Said threaded collar 24, is locked in place by a plurality of secureinent means such as screws 25.

The collar 24, is provided with a thrust ring 26. The oscillatinginlet head is secured in place by a threaded ange 21, and has a `thrust ring 28 between said threaded flange 21 and eccentric sleeve II, and said threaded flange 21 is locked in place by a screw 21a. The so called outboard bearing 29, rigidly supports the eccentric sleeve '15 II, in which the latter is journaled. Member 29, is secured to the casing 30, by means of screws 29A. Said casing 30, is mounted upon the housing or bearing support I4, by screws 3l. Said housing I4, is attached to the stator housing 32, by screws 33. A bonnet 34, is attached to the eccentric sleeve II, by setscrews 35. A tail rod 36, is guided and retained in place by a forked rocker shaft 31. A forked rocker shaft 31 rocks in the stator housing 32, and is secured in place by a collar 38. A dust cap 39, is attached andl secured to the oscillating inlet head I0, by suitable screws 40. Thestator stone I1, is retained in a dished out holder 4I, which isV annular in shape. The dished out stator holder 4I, is retained in place by a ring 42. Said-ringis secured to the stator holder by suitable means. A conical deflecting hood 43, is secured to the lower portion of the oscillating inlet head I0, by any desirable means. 35

Figure 1, illustrates a longitudinal, elevational view and shows a main drive shaft 44, which may be driven by a source of energy such as a motor which latter `may be directly connected to the lower end of the main drive. shaft 44. Said drive shaft 44, rotates a rotor casing 46, thru the medium of a T-headed stud 46. The stud 46, engages a key way in hub 41, which in l turn is driven by drive shaft 44, by means of set screw 48. The stud 46, rotates a universal joint 49, which engages a key way 50, in the rotor. A rotor spring 5I or rubber cylinder, of substantial tension permits axial movement of the rotor member 45, on'the drive shaft 44. The rotor disc holder 52, is seated upon member 46, and is actuated in a rotatable path thereby. This disc holder 52, is directly connected. to -the rotor member 45, by a dowel or other suitable pin 53. Said rotor 45, is adapted to float axially on self aligning bearings 55. This self aligning bearing 55, is of the usual construction in this type of device and is secured to the drive shaft 44, by a lock nut 54. A dust sealing cap 56, is attached to the rotor by screws or other means 58a. The

rotor stone holder 52, is secured to the rotor 45.

by a threaded stud 55. The rotor stone 59. is fused or sintered into re-inforced stone-holder 52. This stone is of the controlled structure type, wherein the ratio of voids or interstices to aggregates is greater than in a natural stone. A

inger 55, of outwardly flared shape is mounted upon the side or periphery of member 45, and is` attached to this member by suitable screws. A radial thrust bearing 6I, is secured to the drive 15 shaft 44, by a combination oil fiinger and lock nut 52. An oil retaining sleeve 63, is pressed into the material of the rotor housing oil reservoir. 'Ihe thrust bearing 5 I is seated in the rotor housing 54, and is held in place by the dust cap 55.

20 The dust cap 55, is secured in place by suitable screws, to the rotor housing 84. A radial thrust bearing 55, is secured to the drive shaft 44, by combination oil flinger and lock nut 61. The radial thrust bearing 65, is adapted to oat in the 25 rotor housing 54. 'Ihe helical spring 69, is adapt- 30 reservoir cap 10, is mounted upon the rotor housing I4, in suspended position by screws 1I. An oil retaining sleeve 10B, is sweated into the aperture formed in the reservoir 10, in a leak proof manner. A motor not shown but housed in sus- 35 pended position beneath the shaft 44, is used to drive the device. A plurality of spill ways 12, are attached to the rotor housing 64, by suitable screws 13.

In the modied type of construction shown in 40 Figure 3, a colloid mill is shown embodying the identical principle of the mill shown in Figure 1. Figure 3 illustrates a vertical section of a vertical mill. In Figure 3, the oscillating stator 14, is similar to that in Figure 1, except for the fact 45 that a plurality of coil springs surmounts the stator holder 15. 'Ihese springs indicated by the numeral 19, urge the stator holder 15, and stone downwardly in floating axial position. A second series of springs 11, presses the packing ring 50 against the stator stone holder 15, so as to prevent entrance of the material into the clearance space. This is a departure from the construction shown in Figure 1, in which the stator stone holder is stationary with reference to the oscillating inlet 55 head I0. Figure 3, also illustrates a self aligning rotor assembly similar-to Figure 1, except that the rotor 19, does not float axially on self aligningv bearing 19. The universal Joint 80, driven by a stud 5 I, drives the rotor 19. The rotor spring ao 5I, the T-head 46, and the driving hub as shown in Figure 1, are eliminated from the design shown in Figure 3. In Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 stone holders may be provided with ribs as in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 so that the stone may be entered into the spaces 05 between the ribs or that the stones pressed into place in the holder while still plastic, and the bond may then be fused thru temperature means or by sintering a suitable stone in a molten condition into these spaces. The object of re- 70 enforcing the stone is to permit a much higher rotational speed than that at which ordinary stones may be operated safely. This high speed is necessary to cause deflocculation and dispersion in various materials. It also creates an intensive 75 turbulent scissors action, in combination with hydraulic shear,A brought about by eddy currents formed in the interstices in the stones, without generating excessive heat as is the case with grooved rotors and stators in roughened surface machines.

In operation the colloid mill functions as follows: The beveled gear I9, is rotated by the pinion gear IB, in some desirable manner. Rotation of these two members causes the eccentric sleeve II, to be turned, the beveled gear I9, being secured slidably t-o member II, by a key 20. Rotation of. the eccentric sleeve I I, imparts an oscillating motion to the inlet head Ill. The inlet head I5, is a run'ning lit in the eccentric sleeve II. The stator stone I1, is securely attached to the oscil, lating inlet head I0, and is therefore given an oscillating motion which can best be described as a reciprocal motion, similar to an eccentric strap. This movement imparts to the surface of the lstator stone I1, and the rotor stone 59, a variable motion identical to that used in lapping two metal surfaces. The lapping process maintains the trueness of the grinding surface to both the stator'and rotor stones, the trueness being necessary to obtain uniform lm thickness. Obviously with a motion of this kind where the stator stones change their position in a variable manner, the grinding surfaces are prevented from becoming tracked, which causes erosion of the grinding surface and prevents the surfaces of the stones from loading with material and glazing. The self aligning thrust bearing I6, is adapted to distribute the thrust load in an even manner and prevents lateral movement of its related parts. The tail rod 36, which is attached to the oscillating inlet head I 0, is adapted to guide the oscillating head Il), in an oscillatory path. A water pocket 19a, is formed above the stator stone and,thru means of inlet pipes not shown will cool the fstator stone and absorb a large part of the heat developed in the grinding process. The defiecting hood 43, is adapted to direct the material leaving the grinding zone toward the water cooled portion of the housing. Inlet and outlet pipes not shown on drawings convey water to and from water jacket in housing 64. The mill is constructed in a divided manner so that the stator housing may be rotated about a hinge 40a, in order to lift the upper portion of the mill approximately 120 degrees, in order to facilitate cleaning of the interior of the rotor housing and all surfaces exposed to the ground material as shown in Figure 1.

A uniform pressure of the rotor grinding surface on the film of material is obtained by advancing the stator stone I1, axially toward the rotor 45. The stator stone may be adjusted axially by turning threaded member I2 in the proper direction so as to raise or lower member I0, thereby lifting the stator stone I1. In this manner the rotor spring 5 I is compressed and the tension of said spring is transmitted to the universal joint 49, and then communicated to the rotor thereby finally urging the grinding snrface of the rotor stone 59, into co-operating contact with the grinding surface of the stator stone I1. The rotor 45, floats axially on a' self. aligning bearing 55. 'I'his self aligning bearing while constraining the rotor 45, to rotate about the center coinciding with the axis of the drive shaft 44, yet permits the grinding surface of the rotor to rotate in a true plane parallel to the grinding surface of the stator I1, thereby compensating for any variation in distance between these two surfaces with what would otherwise exist. The unis u, from being ccmmunicaiea from the driving shaft' of the rotor which would consequently throw said grinding surface out of parallel .with the grinding surface of the stator. This spring tension in combination with the self aligning features, which the .universal joint and selfaligning bearing imparts to the rotor is adapted to maintain a uniform lm thickness. The spring 'tension also automaticallycompels constant pressure on the film, unaffected by shaft elongation due to higher temperature or by change in the viscoslty of the material being ground. Said spring tension in conjunction with the self aligning rotor also permits the passage of any foreign material without damage or injury to the grinding surface of the rotor and stator stones. The amount of tension applied to the rotor spring 5I,`is deter-` mined by the viscosity of the material and the ilneness of the grind desired. The dinger Sli, is provided to prevent access of the -material into the rotor hub clearance. The. Thead on the stud 46, moves axially in a slot in the drive hubwhen the spring is compressed or released, while running.. While at the same time the drive hub 10a, drives the T-head stud I6. Stud Il, drives the hub lla, from the drive shaft Il. The

springs BB, bearing on the retaining ring 89, apply a slight thrust load on the radial thrust bearing 86,to provide axial play of'. the drive shaft Il, from setting up vibration. This thrust bearing g5 also prevents longitudinal expansion due to heat oi' the drive shaft It, from creating a thrust load on bearing 6B.

It is to be noted that certain changes in form andconstruction may be made without departing 46' from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a colloid mill, a longitudinal inlet head, a stator stone secured to said inlet head, a sleeve having an eccentric aperture movably receiving said inlet head, a forked member, a tail rod unitary with said inlet head registering in said forked member for retaining said. inlet head. in oscillating position when said eccentric sleeve is rotated, and an angular deilecting hood uni- 5 tary with said inlet head and stator stone, for

deilecting thevmaterial being ground, a rotor provided with a rotor stone located beneathsaid stator, a drive shaft having an axially bored upperv portion rotatably secured to said rotor through a self aligning bearing, a stud in the bore of said drive shaft and secured thereto by means for axial movement, a universal joint secured at one end to said rotor and at the other end to said stud, and means for resiliently lift-'- o ing said rotor into contacting position with said l stator stone.

2. In a colloidmill. a longitudinal inlet head. a stator stone secured to said inlet head, a sleeve having an eccentric aperture movably reg, ceiving said inlet head, a forked member, a tail,

rod unitary with said inlet lead registering in arenas/c said forked member for retaining inlet head in oscillating position when said eccentric sleeve is rotated, and an angular deiiectin'g hood unitary with said inlet head and stone, for deflecting the material being ground, a rotor provided with a rotor stone located beneath said stator, a drive shaft having an axially bored upper portion rotatably secured to said rotor through a self-aligning bearing, a stud in the bore of said drive shaft and secured thereto by means for axial movement, a universal joint secured at -one end to said rotor and at the other end to said stud, a coiled spring wound about said stud in said drive shaft and adapted'to lift said rotor stone into cooperating position with said stator stone.

3. In a colloid mill, a longitudinal inlet head, a stator stone secured to said inlet head, a sleeve' having an eccentric aperture movably receiving said inlet head,V whichsaid eccentric sleeve is driven by means ofgear and pinion, aforked member, a tail rod unitary with said inlet head registering in said forked member for'retaining Y said inlet head in oscillating position when said eccentric sleeve is rotated, a self-aligning rotor .supporting a rotor stone beneath said stator, a

universal joint engaging said rotor and a main drive shaft, and resilient means on said .stator longitudinally movable and urging said stator stone into cci-operative engagement with said rotor stone.

4. In a colloid mill, a longitudinal inlet head. a stator stone secured to said inlet head. a sleeve having an eccentric aperture movably receiving said inlet head which said eccentric sleeve is driven by means of gear and pinion. a forked member, a tail rod unitary with said inlet head registering inr said forked member for retainiing said inlet head in oscillating position when said eccentric sleeve is rotated, a self-aligning 'rotor supporting a rotor stone beneath said stator, a universal joint secured at one end to a T head drive shaft and at the other end to the said rotor, and resilient means forurging said rotor and rotor stone into co-operative engagement with said stator stone.

5. In'acolloid mill, a longitudinal inlet head, a stator stone lsecured to said inlet head, a sleeve having an eccentric aperture movably receiving said inlet head, which said eccentric sleeve -is driven by means of gear and pinion, a forked member.. a tali-.rod unitary with said' inlet head registering insaid forked member for retainsaid eccentric sleeve is rotated, and an angular Ving said inlet head-Xin oscillating position when deiiectiug hood unitary with said inlet head and stator stone for deilecting the material being ground, a se1f-aligning1rotor supporting a rotor .stone beneath said stator, a universal joint secured at one end to a 'r head drive shaft and at the other end to the said rotor, resilient means for urging said rotor and rotor stone into co-I operative engagement with said stator stone and a ninger on said rotor.

' BENJAMIN ZOBER.

v'il'.'i-IOllAS GARVEY.

Referenced by
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US2556641 *May 22, 1948Jun 12, 1951Bakewell Harding FGrinder for pigments and other materials
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US2573709 *Jul 8, 1946Nov 6, 1951Price Brothers & Company LtdApparatus for rapid heat transfer in process material
US2599543 *Jun 6, 1946Jun 10, 1952Curlator CorpGyratory processing apparatus
US2622490 *Sep 9, 1947Dec 23, 1952Curlator CorpApparatus for treating wood pulp and the like
US2641164 *Jul 8, 1946Jun 9, 1953James T CoghillMethod for processing fibrous pulp
US2646728 *Oct 25, 1946Jul 28, 1953Curlator CorpApparatus for treating wood pulp
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US2689593 *Oct 19, 1950Sep 21, 1954Symons Edgar PGyratory grain cutter
US2718821 *May 25, 1953Sep 27, 1955E D Jones And Sons CompanyPulp refining apparatus and method
US2727695 *Sep 20, 1951Dec 20, 1955Harries Harry GAir swept cereal grinding mill with separator for cracked and floured products
US2884036 *Sep 11, 1953Apr 28, 1959Symons Brothers CoGrain cutters with opposed eccentrically rotating blades
US6170771 *Feb 2, 1999Jan 9, 2001Hrw Limited PartnershipRock crusher
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Classifications
U.S. Classification241/206, 241/212, 241/253, 241/296
International ClassificationB02C7/10, B02C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB02C7/10
European ClassificationB02C7/10