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Publication numberUS2121857 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1938
Filing dateJul 15, 1935
Priority dateJul 15, 1935
Publication numberUS 2121857 A, US 2121857A, US-A-2121857, US2121857 A, US2121857A
InventorsCarley Russell W
Original AssigneePhoenix Hosiery Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hosiery
US 2121857 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 28, 1938. w, CARLEY 2,121,857 I HOSIERY Filed July 15. 1955 INVENTOR.

Patented June 1938 UNlTED :STATES IPA'TEINTR OFFICE I i amss-z I nosmnr I Russell W. Carley, Wauwatosa, Wis.', assignor to- Phoenix Hosiery Company, Milwaukee, was, a corporation of Wisconsin Application mils, 1935, Serial No. 31,439

scams. (choc-1'12)- This invention relates to hosiery and more par ticularly to half-hose or mens socks- I The general purposeand object of my invention is to provide hosiery of this character and more particularly mens socks of regulation length as established by the United States Bureau of $tandards with an arrangement of elastic yarns incorporated in the topsor welts of the socks to" render them self-supportingon the leg of. the wearer without discomfort by reason of the elastic yams gripping about socksare worn.

- In men's socks of regulation length, the topsor welts at the upper ends of the socks extend .up on the fleshier portion or calf of the wearer's leg from the more solid portion just below the calf where the-tops or welts 'join the leg portions of the socks. In accordance with my invention, the

. elastic yarns referred to are so arranged in these top or welt portions that'the greater tension required for the proper support of the sock on the leg of the wearer is provided in the regions best suited for this purpose without increasing the tension of the individual'yarns. J

Incarrying out these objects, I arrange the elastic yarns in groups along the length of the top or weltand preferably provide the terminal groups adjacent the upper and the lower ends of the top or welt with a greater number ofsaid yarns in each terminal group than any oi. the intermediate groups. In this way a greater tension is available in the terminal groups to eifec-i tively support the sock on the leg of the wearer,

without increasing the tension of the individual The intermediate groups by reason of their smaller number of elastic yarns provide less tension on the leg of the wearer and being spaced along the length of the top or welt serve to properly' support the intermediate portions of the top or welt on thewearers calf. As the yarns of the intermediate groups provide less tensionthan the terminal groups,'there is less gripping on the leg ofthe wearer along the softer portion of the calf and the sock can be worn without discomfort by the wearers leg when the reasonof the elastic yarns incorporated in its top or welt construction. I

The elastic yarns are incorporated inthe top or welt in the manufacture of the top or welt by laying or knitting in the yarns; The top or welt is knitted, comprising interengaged-or interlocked loops disposed in successive courses and wales. The courses extend circumferentially of the top or welt,. the latter being tubular in form, being produced on a circular top or welt knitting ma- 1o chine. The elastic yarns when laid in. n age" the loops in the selected courses at the points of interconnection of the loops and extend in a straight direction throughout the courses, the

ends of these yarns being tied or knotted together, 1

preferably where the courses join, so that the yarns may stretch longitudinally when the top or welt is distended in fitting about the leg of the v In a knitted construction, the elastic yarns form the coursesin which they are ingo wearer.

corporated and stretch longitudinally'when the.

top or welt is distendeda The elastic yarns in each group are knitted or laid in the successive courses of the group. Thus in the terminal groups the yarns include a larger number of successive 86 courses than in any intermediate group. Moreover, the stretching of the top or welt to fit about I the leg of the wearer is facilitated by having the groups spaced apart a reasonable number. of courses.

of elastic yarns between the several groups of such yarns. This arrangement also enables the top or welt of the sock to respond easily to the muscular action of the calf in the movement'of r the leg without discomfort by the tension of the elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt construction.

' The yarns of all of the groups are preferably of substantially the same size and tension so that $9 the individual yarns may be laid in the top or welt from thesame source and at an initial tension suflicient to be stretched without exerting an undue pressure on the wearer's leg even at the calf, yet return the top or welt to its normal tubula'r form when not in use.

In the accompanying drawing illustrating my invention, Fig. 1 shows my improved sock as it appears in use on the leg of awearer; v a

Fig. 2 is a view principally of the top or welt to more clearly show the group and spacing arrangement of the elastic yarns in the top cordance with my invention;' and Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view showing the man- This provides freely and readily dis- '0 tensible knitted portions of the top or welt free or welt in 'acner in which the elastic yarns are laid in the selected courses of the top or welt.

The sock shown in the drawing is of the regulation length. It has a leg portion I, a foot portion 2, and a top or welt 3. The latter fits about the leg of the wearer in the manner shown in Fig. 1.

It will be noted that the top or welt has a length to extend well up on the calf of the leg froma point below the calf where the top or welt joins the leg portion 2 of the sock.

The elastic yarns, marked 6, 4 in the drawing, are incorporated in the top or welt 3 as the top or welt is knitted on a circular knitting machine of the character employed for top or welt knitting. If the top or welt is ribbed, which is usually the case, a so-called rib knitting machine is employed to produce the top or welt.

The yarns 4, in accordance with my invention, are arranged in spaced groups along the length of the top or welt with the terminal groups a, b

each other and from the terminal groups a, b a

predetermined number of courses. Each group of elastic yarns comprises a plurality of such yarns, the terminal groups a, b each comprising a greater number of said yarns than any intermediate group., In the particular embodiment of the invention disclosed herein, the terminal groups a, b each comprise six elastic yarns, while the groups 11 each comprise two elastic yarns, and the group 0 comprises four elastic yarns.

With the group arrangement disclosed, the

terminal groups a, b aiford a greater tension.

than an intermediate group and thus the greater tension is available at the regions best suited for the proper support of the sock on the leg of the wearer. The lower group b embraces the more or less solid part of the leg just below the calf and thus may grip sufliciently tight to hold up the leg portion l of the sock without wrinkle or sag. This is augmented by the group 0 next above the group b.

The group a grips about the fleshier part of the leg constituting the calf and being at the upper end of the sock, holds up the top or welt 3. With a large number of elastic yarns in this group, the tension of the stretched yarns'is so distributed over the region of the group that the grip on the fleshier part of the leg is not so tight as to be uncomfortable or hinder the circulation of the blood in the leg.

The intermediate groups d, by reason of their fewer number of elastic yarns, exert less tension when stretched than the other groups, and thus may fit about the calf of the leg and conform to the varying contour thereof without undue pressure. As these groups are spaced along the length of the top or welt, they conform the top or welt throughout to the leg of the wearer and aid in properly supporting the top or welt.

The yarns 4 of the several groups are laid or knitted in the top or welt 3 at aslight initial tension so that the yarns will return the top or welt to its normal form when not in use. The tension of the individual yarns is substantially the same throughout all of the groups. and this tension is not enough to cause a single yarn to so tightly grip" the leg of the wearer as to bind even on the fleshier portion or calf of the leg. The increased tension required at the terminal groups a, b and c is obtained by increasing the number of said yarns, thus avoiding anyundue gripping on the leg of the wearer as would, be occasioned by increasing the tensions of the yarns themselves. I

As shown in Fig. 3, the top or welt is a knitted structure comprisingan arrangement of interengaged or interlocked loops arranged in. successive courses and wales. The courses, indi cated by e, extend circumferentially of the top or welt while the wales, indicated by I, extend longitudinally of the .top or welt. The elastic yarns 4 are laid in this structure in the manner shown in Fig. 3. This follows the usual laying in practice in rib knitting, and as shown in Fig. 3, the elastic yarns 4 extend lengthwise of the courses in which they are laid and are interenga'ged with the loops of these courses along the points of their interconnection. The yarns extend continuously along thev selected courses and have their ends tied or knotted together at a selected point in the course, preferably at or adjacent the rear of the top or welt where the courses are interlocked as in top or welt structures of this general character. Thus, the courses and the yarns may-stretch when the top or welt is distended, the yarns being laid in the top or welt ata slight tension as heretofore described.

As indicated in Fig. 3, the elastic yarns 4 are laid in successive courses, and this is followed for all of the groups.

leg, yet allows free muscular movement without hindrance or binding by reason of the grip of the elastic yarns even about the fleshy portion of the calf. I find in actual practice that an eighteen course spacing between group b and the top of the leg portion of the sock and between group a and the group d next below and a fourteen course spacing between the other groups produces a satisfactory product. vI do not wish to be limited, however, to this particular spacing arrangement, the latter being cited merely as an example.

It will be noted from Fig. 2 that the top or welt is more or less uniform in diameter invention and provide an effective self-support fora sock of the character described.

A regulation length sock offers less sales resistance to the general run of customers than theshorteror the longer socks. Moreover, the regulation length sock fits up on the calf of the leg for all leg lengths; instead of above the calf for the longer socks or below the calf for the shorter socks. The regulation length sock also has the advantage of covering the desired portion of the leg, and with the elastic yarn arrangement of my invention incorporated in .the sock as herein disclosed, such socks may be made effectively self-supporting without discomfort by reason of the elastic yarns encircling and gripping the leg in the region of and about the calf The details of structure shown and described may be variously changed and modified without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention, except as pointed out in the annexed claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A stocking having a, knitted top or wen; and

elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt and extending circumferentially thereof, said yarns being arranged in groups spaced along the length of the top or welt in selected of the courses thereof, the terminal groups adjacent the upper and the lowerendsof the top or welt,

each occupying a greater number of courses than any intermediate group whereby the terminal groups when stretched will exert a greater contractile force than an intermediate group.'

2. A stocking having a knitted top or welt and elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt and extending circumferentially thereof, said yarns being arranged in groups spaced along the length of the top or welt in selected of the courses .thereof, the terminal groups adjacent the upper the courses thereof, saidyarns being arranged in groups and having, their ends secured together in their respective courses, there being a plurality of said yarns in each group and occupying the successive courses thereof, the groups being spaced apart along the length of the top or welt a. predetermined number of courses free of said elastic yarns to facilitate distendingthe top or welt.

, 4. A stocking having a knitted top or welt composed of interlocked loops arranged in successive courses and wales, and elastic yarns extending circumferentially of the top or welt in certain of the courses thereof, said yams being ar-' ranged in groups and having their ends joined together in their respective courses, there being a plurality of said yarns-in each group and occupying the successive courses thereof, said groups being spaced apart along the length of the top or welta predetermined number of courses freeof said yarns, and-certain of the groups each comprising a greater number of elastic yarns than the others whereby the groups having the greater number of elastic yarns when stretched, will exert a greater contractile force than any group having a lesser number of said yarns.

5. A stocking having a knitted top or welt composed of interlocked loops arranged in successive courses and wales, and elastic yarns extending circumferentially of the top or welt and laid in certain of the courses thereof, said yarns being arranged in groups spaced along the length of the top or welt and having their ends joined together in their respective courses, there being a plurality of said yarns in each group and occupying the successive courses thereof, certain of the groups each comprising a greater number of elastic yarns thanothers, and the elastic yarns of the several groups each having substantially the same tension.

6. A stocking having connected foot, leg, and top or welt portions, the latter being at the upper end of the leg portion, and elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt in groups to provide a self-support for the stocking on the leg of a wearer, said-groups being spaced along the length of the top or welt andarranged with the terminal groups adjacent the ends of the top' or welt and the intermediate groups between the terminal groups and spaced from one another and the terminal'groups. by portions of the top or welt free of elastic yarns.

7. A stocking having connected foot, leg, and

top or welt portions, the latter being at the upper end of the leg portion and consisting of a knitted structure composed of interlocked loops arranged in successive courses and wales, and elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt in groups to provide a self-support for the stocking on the leg of the wearer, the yarns of each group being laid in the courses of the top or welt and occupying as many successive courses thereof as there are yarns in the group, 'said groups being spaced along the length of the top or welt and arranged with the terminal groups adjacent the ends of the top or welt and the intermediate groups -between the terminal groups and spaced from'one another and the terminal groups by portions of the top or welt free of elastic yarns.

8. A man's sock of regulation length having a knitted top or welt to embrace and fit about the calf of the leg of a wearer, and elastic yarns incorporated in the top or welt in the courses there- 'of, and arranged in groups along the length of the top-or welt in a manner to provide terminal.

groups adjacent the ends of the top or welt and intermediate groups between and in spaced relation to each other and to the terminal groups to provide a self-support for the sock on the leg of the wearer.

' RUSSELL W. CARLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2731819 *Mar 26, 1952Jan 24, 1956 crawford
US4390999 *Dec 29, 1980Jul 5, 1983Kellwood CompanyPanty hose with body bulge control
US7634923 *Nov 1, 2006Dec 22, 2009Gunze LimitedTerminal knitting texture and clothing provided with this terminal knitting texture
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/172.00E
International ClassificationD04B9/00, D04B9/54
Cooperative ClassificationD04B9/54
European ClassificationD04B9/54