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Publication numberUS2122550 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1938
Filing dateJun 13, 1932
Priority dateJun 13, 1932
Publication numberUS 2122550 A, US 2122550A, US-A-2122550, US2122550 A, US2122550A
InventorsAdrian Sylvester F
Original AssigneeAdrian Sylvester F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin controlled sound reproducing system
US 2122550 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1938. s. F. ADRIAN COIN CONTROLLED SQUND REPRODUCING SYSTEM 2 Sheets-She et 1 Filed June 15, 1932 ZISPZOPUGEZ 5, s ADRAN COIN CONTROLLED SOUND REPRODUCING SYSTEM Filed June 13, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 5, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TEM Sylvester F. Adrian, Fond du Lac, Wis. Application June 13, 1932, Serial No. 816,804

19 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in coincontrolled sound reproducing systems.

The invention has particular reference to installations where sound is reproduced by a phonograph or radio in metered response to the insertion of a coin in a suitable control box.

It is the primary object of the invention to provide means whereby the reproducing mechanism will respond to any one of a number of coins inserted in the control box, and will accurately meter its service in proportion to the value of the coin deposited. If, for example, the unit of service is given upon deposit of a 5 coin, it is my purpose not only to give two units of service if two 5 coins are deposited in the box in succession, but also to give two units of service if a dime be deposited in the box, and five or six units of service if a pieceis deposited in the box.

It is a further very important object of the invention to provide for the operation of the system from a number of control stations, with a preferred arrangement whereby the reproducer will be connected automatically to a speaker at each individual station to give to that station a reproduction service measured according to the value of the coin deposited at that particular station irrespective of the extent to which the reproducing mechanism may already be functioning in response to a coin dropped at some different station.

It is a further object of the invention to insure to each station at which a coin may be deposited, a full and complete response to the value of said coin, the apparatus being incapable of discontinuing its function at the conclusion of a given selection or time interval which may be in progress at the moment the coin is deposited at the station in question.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art in the light of the disclosure herein contained.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of installation embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a front elevation of a. control box made in accordance with the invention and from which the front cover has been removed.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the coin sorting apparatus shown in Figure 2, the rear of the box being illustrated in section.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary detail on an enlarged scale showing the top of the coin sorting apparatus in rear elevation.

Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view showing a modified installation of a system embodying the invention.

Figure 6 is a plan view of a modified coin sorting device.

Figure 7 is a. detail view in perspective, showa ing a front three-quarter view of the device shown in Figure 6.

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters throughout the several views.

It is broadly immaterial to the present inven- 10 tion what constitutes the source of the sound to be reproduced. Conveniently, the reproducer l0 may comprise an automatic phonograph or a radio amplifier of any well known type. If a phonograph, the reproducing service is usually 5 regulated by a switch ll closed upon the conclusion of the playing of one record. If the reproducer consists of a radio receiver, the service to be rendered is usually metered from the standpoint of time, and the conclusion of one service unit is marked by the closing of a time controlled switch in accordance with means well known in the art as equivalent for the switch shown at ll in Figs. 1 and 5.

For the purposes of the present disclosure it 25 may be assumed that the reproducer l0 functions electrically, being supplied with current from a pair of volt mains I2 and I3 and arranged to deliver its output through the electrical conductors H and i5 which connect with dis- 30 tributing lines l6 and il leading to the speakers i8 at the several stations at which coins may be deposited. In the system shown in Fig. 5 a single speaker I8 is centrally located to be heard from all stations, consequently the dis- 5 tributing lines i6 and H are unnecessary.

At each one of the several stations above referred to, is a. coin operated control box. In the construction shown in Figs. 6 and 7 the arrangement is such that a coin of a given denomina- 40 tion will operate a single given switch, the coins being automatically sorted to operate properly their respective switches. In the preferred construction shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, there is a series of switches having operating levers dis- 5 posed in a given coin path, and the coins are automatically sorted and so routed past the switches that a coin of large denomination will pass all of the switches and coins of small denominations will respectively pass only as many 5 of the switches as will give the desired response. The coin sorting mechanism is essentially similar in each case.

A fiat tube 20 having a coin receiving aperture at 2| is inclined downwardly so that a coin will 5 roll by gravity through the tube from the aperture. The flat tube is also curved in the plane of its least dimension so that as the coinrolls through the tube it will bear centrifugally against the rear wall thereof.

As clearly shown in Fig. 4, the rear-of the tube is provided with an opening at 22 bounded by a notched marginal wall of the tube. The height of said margin at 23 is only slightly less than the diameter of the smallest coin adapted to be handled by the sorting device. This may be assumed to be a dime. If any coin or slug smaller than a dime be placed in the tube it will be thrown centrifugally from the opening 22 below margin 23 and will not reach any of the subsequent apparatus normally operated by a proper coin.

At 24 the margin of opening 22 is just sufliciently removed abovethe bottom of the tube to permit a dime to pass from the tube. Consequently, a 10 piece introduced into opening 2i will leave the tube at 24 and fall into a hopper 25 which will guide it upon the proper path for the actuation of subsequent mechanism. The margin 26 of the tube is just sufliciently large to permit the passage of a penny which, not being of sufiicient value to operate the machine, does not pass into any of the hoppers, nor does it operate any of the mechanism.

The opening 21 is of suflicient size to permit the discharge of a nickel from the tube, and a nickel so discharged is caught by the hopper 28. A quarter is too large to pass through any portion ofopening 22 in the rear of the tube, and hence runs the full length of the tube and reaches discharge slot 29.

I preferably provide an additional opening at 30 in the front of the tube through which magnetic slugs will be guided by a magnet 3| supported in front of said opening by a shielding plate 32.

While the coin sorting mechanism of Figs. 2, 3 and 4 is essentially similar to that of Figs. 6 and 7, the operations efi'ected by the coins are quite distinctly difierent. In the construction shown in Figs. 6 and 7 each coin passing through the sorter operates a specific switch, including a coin operated lever disposed in the path of the coin. The lever 34 (Fig. 7) projects in the path of a quarter issuing from slot 29 at the end of tube 20. When a quarter strikes the end of the lever it oscillates the lever about its fulcrum on screw 35 to engage contact 36, thereby closing a circuit which will be described later in connection with the wiring diagram shown at Fig. 5. A similar lever 31 is disposed below the mouth of hopper 28 and co-acts with a contact 38 to be operated by nickels. A third lever 39 is disposed below the mouth of hopper 25 and co-acts with a contact spring 40 when acted on by dimes deposited in hopper 25 by the coin sorting device.

In the construction shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, the quarter slot 29 discharges at the top of a coin path along which a series of switches is disposed. The switch operating levers 4|, which may be five or six in number, are staggered alternately at opposite sides of the coin path, a guide 42 being used directly across from each of the switch figures to insure contact of the coin therewith. Each of the switch levers co-acts, when engaged by a coin, with a spring contact 43, the contacts being connected in accordance with the wiring dia gram shown in Fig. 1 and later to be described.

, From hopper 25 a tube 44 leads into the coin path through opening 45 just above the second last switch, whereby a dime in hopper 25 may pass through tube 44'to engage two of the switches of the aforesaid series. From hopper 28 a like tube 46 sufllciently large to accommodate a 5 piece leads into the coin path through an opening at 41 just above the lowermost switch actuating lever, whereby a nickel deposited by the coin sorting mechanism in hopper 28 will actuate but one switch of the series.

The several contacts 43 and contact levers 4| are all connected in parallel as shown in Fig. l, the object simply being to deliver from the series a number of electrical impulses accurately corresponding to the value of the coin deposited, or rather to the multiple relation of such coin to a coin of unit value. While it is obviously unnecessary to design the apparatus for the particular coins herein mentioned, a nickel or 5 piece is taken as the unit or minimum value to which the apparatus will respond. Thus the nickel, in closing a single switch, will give but a single electrical impulse. A dime, in closing two switches, will give two such impulses while a quarter, in closing live or six switches, will give five or six impulses (the sixth, if used, being a special concession because of the large denomination of the coin deposited).

The means by which'the electrical impulses are employed to regulate the operation of the machine are based upon conventional equipment in large part, including well known mechanism for enabling mechanical reproducers to respond correctly to a number of coins successively deposited. This means will now. be described.

The previously known part of the device includes, for each station, a main switch 59 for controlling the reproducer H]. The several main switches 50 are connected inparallel with each other by the leads 5| and 52. The moving contact lever 53 of each switch 5|]. is subject to the action of a tension spring 54 tending to close the switch. Lever 53, however, is disposed in the path of a pin 55 carried by an escapement ratchet 56 which is subject to the action of a torsion spring (not shown) tending to rotate the ratchet clockwise as viewed in Fig. 1.

The ratchet pawl 51 is operated by electromagnet 58 to permit the wheel 56 one tooth advance in a clockwise direction upon each energization of the magnet. The magnet is connected in series with the bank of switches 43 and with a source of low voltage current such as may be provided by the lines 59. Thus, the deposit of a coin in any one of the control boxes at any station will produce at that station a number of impulses corresponding to the relative demonination of the coin, and this number of impulses will actuate the ratchet pawl 51 to permit the wheel 56 to rotate a number of teeth corresponding to the number of impulses received.

Upon-the conclusion of each reproducing period, paid for by the coin of unit value, the reproducing mechanism III will close the switch ll whereby, through mechanism hereinafter to be described, the lever 60 and spring rewinding pawl 6| will operate on the ratchet wheel 56 to move it one step in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1. As soon as the switch closing pin 55 releases the switch lever 53 upon the initial clockwise movement of the ratchet wheel, switch 50 is closed to start the operation of the reproducer. Any subsequent movement of the ratchet wheel merely leaves the switch closed. When, however, the lever 60 and pawl 6| have operated conversely upon the wheel for a surficient number of steps, a pin 55 will ultimately engage lever 53 again, to re-open switch 50 and thereby cause the reproducer' todiscontinue its reproduction.

"The control mechanism Justdescribed is well known having heretofore been used, however, merely in the control of a single speaker. For the purposes of the present invention the following additional mechanism is associated.

In each control box, and linked to each switch lever 53, is a second switch lever 63 which preferably operates two switches of the mercury type.

Switch 65 is connected in series between the reproducer output line I4 and the corresponding speaker H3 at the particular station. The closing of switch 50 to energize the radio reproducer l0 likewise closes switch 65 to energize the speaker at that station. If the reproducer is already in operationfthe station in question will receive the unfinished portion of the selection which the reproducer is delivering at the time. The closing of switch H, however, would ordinarily operate to open switch 50 upon the conclusion of this unfinished portion of a selection were it not for the provision of switch 66 which is a three terminal switch functioning to give each station the full number of selections warranted by the coin deposited.

It will be observed from an inspection of Fig. 1, that the switch 50 in the upper control box is open while switch 50 in the lower control box is closed. In each instance the right hand terminal of switch 65 is connected with the lead to electromagnet 58, while the left hand electrode is connected to one side of the supply line 59. The middle electrodes of the respective switches 65 are connected to each other but are otherwise dead except when energized by the tilting of switch lever 63 to the position in which it appears in the lower control box in Fig. 1. The left hand electrodes of the switches are also connected to each other.

Assuming all of the switches 66 to be in the open position shown in the upper control box in Fig. 1, the closing of one such switch as shown in the lower control box in Fig. 1 will be ineffective. The mercury in the switch will, in fiowing from one end of the tube to the other, momentarily establish a connection between the right hand and the central contacts of the switch. The central electrode, however, will be dead, and hence no effect on magnet 58 will result. With the switch in its closed position, however, the left hand contact, being supplied with current from one of the low voltage lines 59, will energize the central electrodes of all of the other switches at the various stations.

Therefore if, while the parts are in the position shown in the lower control box of Fig. 1, a coin is deposited at one of the other stations, the closing of switch 66 at such other. station will find the central electrode energized, and consequently the flowage of the mercury from one end of the tube to the other will transmit current from the energized central electrode momentarily to the right hand electrode, thereby yielding an impulse in the corresponding magnet 58 which will have the same effect as if an additional coin of unit value had been deposited at this station. By reason of this arrangement, if the reproducer is already playing at one station when a coin is deposited at another, the ratchet of the second station is advanced an extra tooth, thereby insuring that the second station will receive not only the unfinished portion of the selection already being reproduced, but also the full reproducing period paid for by the coin deposited at the second station.

In order that the electromagnet 15 may have ample time to attract the armature portion 16 of lever 60, I prefer to supplement switch H by a thermostatic switch serving all of the electromagnets 15. The supply main I3 is connected to contact of a switch whereof the movable contact 18 comprises a bi-metallic thermostat connected with one side of switch II and surrounded by an electrical resistance 19. In parallel with switch H is a switch having fixed contact and movable contact 8!. The latter tends to close the switch, but is normally held open by lever 60. Contact 8| and switch ll both serve to supply current through the thermostatic element 18 to the several electromagnets 15 and to the resistance 19 which is in parallel with the electromagnets.

When the switch ll closes, the electromagnets are immediately energized to attract the several armatures 16, thereby advancing each ratchet wheel 56 in a counterclockwise direction. The initial movement of levers 66, however, closes contacts 8| and 86, thereby keeping electromagnet opening of switch ll. After the electromagnets have been closed for a sufficient time to insure the proper operation of the ratchet wheels 56 against their respective torsion springs, the warming up of resistance element 19 will ultimately act on the thermostatic switch contact 18 to lift it from contact 17, thereby breaking the circuit to electromagnet I5 and permitting lever 60 to oscillate to a position where contacts 8| and 86 will be opened again.

Referring now to Fig. 5, it will be noted that this diagram includes the same basic structure including the main switch 50, switch lever 53, tension spring 54, ratchet wheel 56, ratchet pawl 51, electromagnet 58, lever 66, actuating pawl 6|, and electromagnet 15. The preferred thermostatically controlled relay switch is also employed as described immediately above, the switch comprising contacts ll-I8 being in series with the switch II and its parallel connected switch comprising contacts Bil-8|. In this device only one control box is necessary, since there is but one speaker, and impulses generated by the deposit of coins at any one of several stations are all transmitted directly to the single electromagnet 58 at the central control box.

It will be noted that one side of the low voltage lines 59 is connected directly with electromagnet 58, the other side being connected with a conductor supplying current to the several switch lever contacts 34, 31 and 39 at the individual stations. The fixed contacts co-acting with the nickel-operated levers 31 are connected by conductor 86, which leads directly to electromagnet 58 to produce a single impulse whereby the ratchet pawl 51 releases wheel 56 by one tooth upon the deposit of each nickel.

The fixed contacts 40, co-acting with the dimeoperated levers 39, are connected by a conductor 81 which leads to a device for producing electromechanically two impulses in electromagnet 58. Thus, when either of the switch levers 39 is closed upon its contact 40 and conductor 81 is thereby energized, it energizes an electromagnet 88 to attract armature 89 and thereby to close switches 50 and SI. Latch means is provided at 92 for holding the armature 89 in switch closing position.

"'5 energized notwithstanding the immediate The switch to controls solenoid 94, which is supplied with current through the connection shown, and which attracts its armature 95 to oscillate a contact bar 96 across two series of contacts 91 and 98. The contact bar 98 is in the form of a rock shaft and carries clockwork 99 having a dashpot action in the way of retarding its rate of movement. A line I00 from one side of the low voltage supply mains 59 energizes the moving contact arm 96,.

In the course of the movement of arm 96, the said aimsuccessively engages the two contacts 98, whereby current is transmitted through the closed switch 9! to electromagnet 59 and back to the supply main 59. Thus, two impulses :are produced by the deposit of a dime to advance the ratchet wheel 56 two teeth and enable the playing of two selections.

If the quarter-operated switch levers 94 had been closed, conductor I01 would have led to the energization of electromagnet I09, the attraction of armature I99, and the closing of switches I! 0 and I I I. Switch I I0 is in parallel with switch and has the same effect in causing solenoid 94 to oscillate the contactor lever 96. The closing of switch Iii, instead of switch 9|, however, would mean that contacts 97 rather than contacts 99, in the path of movement of lever 96, would have been operative, thereby producing six impulses in electromagnet 58 to advance the ratchet wheel 56 by six teeth instead of one or two. In any case, the final movement of the contactor lever 96 into engagement with contact H2, energizes the two magnets H3 to trip both of the detents 92, thereby allowing switches 30, 9|, H0, and iii to open. Upon the opening of these switches the solenoid 94 is no longer energized, and the weight of armature restores the contactor lever 96 to a position in which it appears in Fig. 5,

It will be seen that in both of the installations herein disclosed I have provided means whereby a coin of unit value may be deposited at any one of a number of control stations to actuate a central reproducer which, in the Fig. 1 construction, will operate a speaker only at the point where the coin is deposited, and in the case of the Fig. 5 construction will operate a speaker audible at all the stations. In both instances I have provided means whereby the deposit of a coin of more than unit value will automatically establish connections whereby the speaker will remain in operation for a corresponding number of reproducing periods.

In the Fig. -1 construction where the individual speakers are controlled, exclusively by their own coin boxes, I have also provided means for insuring that each speaker will function for a number of reproducing periods accurately corresponding to the relative value of the coin deposited regardless of the fact that the central reproducer may have been in operation and the mechanism may consequently be subject to a terminating impulse at the time the coin is deposited.

I claim:

1. In 'a coin operated control mechanism, the combination with a coin sorting device having a single inlet and means for sorting coins, of a measuring mechanism including a part arranged to respond upon the deposit of a coin by movesorting means to said last mentioned means for delivering coins of diilerent denominations to the particular response determining means operable by the respective coins, whereby the deposit in the inlet of said coin sorting means of any coin within the capacity thereof is automatically determinative of the response of said part.

2. A coin operated control mechanism, comprising the combination with a measuring service device, of means determinative of the response of said device, a coin sorter having a single inlet and coin delivery ports individual to respective coins of differing denominations, and conduits running from the respective ports to said response determining means and comprising mechanism affecting said response determining means in accordance with the denominations of the particular coins carried by the respective conduits.

3. In a reproducing system, the combination with a reproducer, of a coin sorting device having channels to receive the sorted coins, and means in the path of a coin traversing each such channel for energizing the reproducer for varying periods corresponding to the relative value of the coin.

e. In a reproducing system, the combination with a reproducer and means operable in unit steps for determining the. number of periods through which said reproducer shail operate, of a coin receiver comprising a single coin-admission path adapted to receive coins of different denominations and including means for operating said period determining means for a number of steps depending upon the relative denomination of the coin deposited in said coin receiving units.

5. In a. reproducing system, the combination with a reproducer and impulse actuated means operable in steps for determining the number of periods for which said reproducing means shall function, a coin sorter, and means actuated by the sorted coins for transmitting tosaid period determining means dlfierent numbers of impulses depending on the value of the coin deposited.

6. In a reproducer system, the combination with a reproducer, of impulse operated means for controlling the reproducer, a series of impulse producing switches, and coin receiving means ineluding a sorting means and conduits leading from said sorting means for guiding coins of diiferent denominations past predetermined switches in accordance with their respective denominations.

7. In a device of the character described, the combination with a coin deposit means including uides for coins of different denominations, of a series of switch contacts disposed in the path of movement of the coin of largest denomination, the guides for coins of lesser denominations being respectively directed into said path at points such that coins directed thereby will engage a number of said contacts corresponding to their respective denominations.

8. In a coin control mechanism, the combination with a single series of coin operabie switch contacts and a series of coin guide conduits, one of said conduits leading a coin conveyed thereby into operating relation to all of the contacts of said series and the remaining conduits being ar ranged to lead the coins respectively carried therebyinto the first conduit in operating relation to respectively lesser numbers of contacts of said series in general proportion to the denomination of the coin carried by each conduit, the several conduits being designed to receive coins of particular denominations whereby-the number of contact operations will correspond to the denomination of the operating coin.

9. A coin operated control device comprising the combination with a coin sorter having openings for delivering coins of diflering denominations, of a conduit leadingv from the opening for the coin of largest denomination, a series of electrical contacts associated with said conduit and arranged to be actuated successively by the passage of a coin through said conduit, and a second conduit leading from another opening of said coin sorter to said first conduit at a point beyond some of said contacts, whereby the pas sage of a coin through said second conduit and the remaining portion of said first conduit will actuate a number of said contacts less than the total number thereof.

10. A coin operated control device comprising the combination with a coin sorter having openings for delivering coins of differing denominations, of a conduit leading from the opening for the coin of largest denomination, a series of electrical contacts associated with said conduit and arranged to be actuated successively by the passage of a coin through said conduit, a second conduit leading from another opening of said coin sorter to said first conduit at a point beyond some of said contacts, whereby the passage of a coin through said second conduit and the remaining portion of said first conduit will actuate a number of said contacts less than the total number thereof, and a measuring device provided with metering means operated by the respective contacts to a degree proportionate to the number of contacts actuated, whereby the operation of said metering means is automatically proportioned to the denomination of the coin inserted in said coin sorter.

11. In a reproducing system, the combination with a reproducer and means operable in unit steps for determining the number of periods through which said reproducer shall operate, of a coin sorter adapted to separate coins of unit denomination from coins in multiples of said unit denomination, conduits arranged to receive from said coin sorter coins of different denomination, mechanism operated by the passage of the respective coins through the respective conduits for actuating said first mentioned means to a degree corresponding to the denomination of the respective coins and the number thereof, whereby the response of said reproducer will be proportioned to the total value or the coins irrespective of their particular denomination or number.

12. A coin control mechanism comprising the combination with a common measuring device, of means for the impulse actuation of said measuring device to determine the response thereof in accordance with the number of impulses received by said device, a plurality of coin sorting mechanisms, an impulse generating means associated with each such mechanism and including contacts arranged to be actuated to generate a number of impulses corresponding to the denomination of individual coins sorted by said means, and conductors connecting said impulse generating means in parallel to said impulse actuated means, whereby said measuring device will respond in proportion to the denomination of a coin delivered to said sorter.

13. In a reproducing system, the combination with a reproducer and a plurality of coin receiving devices each adapted to receive coins of differing denominations, of impulse operated means determinative of the number of periods of operation of said reproducer, and means associated with each of said coin devices for transmitting to said impulse operated means a number of impulses corresponding to the denomination of a coin deposited in the given device.

14. In a reproducer system, the combination with a reproducer and coin receiving devices at a plurality of stations, of speakers at the several stations, coin operated means at each station controlling the operation of the reproducer, and means for insuring the delivery to each such speaker of a full period of reproducer operation paid for by the coin deposited at such station irrespective of the operation of the reproducer to satisfy the requirements of any other station.

15. In a reproducer system, the combination with an electric reproducer, coin receiving devices at a plurality of stations and speakers at the respective stations, of coin controlled means at each station actuated by coins deposited in said devices and including impulse actuated parts determinative of the operation of the reproducer, and means energized by the operation of one such part at one station for creating an additional impulse in connection with the actuation of such part at another station, whereby to in- I sure the reproduction in the speaker of the last mentioned station of a full period paid for by the coin there deposited irrespective of the completion of the period of an incomplete period paid for by the coin deposited at the first mentioned station, each such part having means for coupling the speaker at the respective station with the reproducer.

16. In a reproducer system, the combination with an electrical reproducer, a plurality of control mechanisms each including switches connected in parallel for the control of the reproducer, means for opening the respective switches upon the conclusion of a predetermined period of operation of the reproducer, a speaker associated with each control mechanism, and means for coupling the speaker to the reproducer only when the switches of their respective control mechanisms are closed, together with means for deferring the opening of the switch of a given control mechanism when the switch of another control mechanism is closed at the time said given control mechanism is operated.

17. A reproducer system comprising the combination with a reproducer, of a series of control mechanisms including switches connected in parallel for the control of the reproducer, speaker switches mechanically linked to said first mentioned switches and connected with said reproducer, speakers respectively connected with the speaker switches of the respective control units to be actuated selectively from said reproducer, impulse-operated means determinative of the number of periods of reproducer operation for which the switch of each given control mechanism will remain closed, coin operated means for generating impulses, and a three way switch associated at each control mechanism, said switches being connected to be energized by the previous closing of a main switch in another control mechanism for the generation of an additional impulse in a control mechanism in which the switch is subsequently closed, whereby to insure the reproduction in the speaker of said last men tioned control mechanism of the full number of periods 01' reproducer operation for which a coin deposited at said last mentioned control mechanism is intended to pay.

19. In a reproducer system, the combination with a reproducer cut-oi! switch and an electromagnet provided with an armature, of an armature operated switch in parallel with said cutoif switch, a thermostatically controlled switch'in series with both of said first mentioned switches, and a resistance influencing said thermostatic switch and connected in parallel with said electromagnet for'the opening of said thermostatic switch.

SYLVESTER F. ADRIAN.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/227, 453/9, 194/203
International ClassificationG07F17/30, G07F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/305
European ClassificationG07F17/30B