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Publication numberUS2124523 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1938
Filing dateFeb 25, 1936
Priority dateFeb 25, 1936
Publication numberUS 2124523 A, US 2124523A, US-A-2124523, US2124523 A, US2124523A
InventorsBlanton Carl L
Original AssigneeBlanton Carl L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine cooling system and structure
US 2124523 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 26, ,1938. c.- L. BLANTON ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM AND STRUCTURE Filed Feb. 25, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.1

I' 7 :1 2 ui INVENTOR- Carl L.Blan+o n July 26, 1938. L, B AN ON "2,124,523

ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM AND STRUCTURE Filed Feb. 25, 1936 SheetsSheet 2 INVENTOR Carl L. Elanbn Jul 26,1938.

Fig.5

c. 1.. BLANTON I ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM AND STRUCTURE Filed Feb. 25, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Yes 'INVENTOR Carl L. 5lan+on Patented July 26, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE- ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM AND STRUCTURE This invention relates generally to an internal combustion engine type of locomotive and more particularly to an improved engine cooling system and structure therefor.

It is an object of my invention to provide an improved engine cooling system and self-contained structure with its component parts so functionally and structurally related as to form a relatively simple, compact and rugged apparatus that is comparatively economical in manufacture, maintenance and operation and provides efiicient flow passages for the cooling water through the entire system. 2

In one specific aspect of the invention I accomplish the foregoing object by providing an improved engine bed having a water compartment or passages therein and arranged to support a radiator having direct communication with the Water passages in the bed.

Other objects and advantages will be more apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description of the accompanying drawings in which: 7

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of an internal combustion engine type of locomotive embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the forward portion of the locomotive with parts broken away to show details of construction and with certain radiator sections omitted for'purposes of clarity;

Fig. 3 is a perspective of the front end of the engine bed, showing the lower radiator tank embodied as a part of the engine bed together with an upper radiator tank suitably supported thereby;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2 to show the manner of providing passage walls for the cooling air passing over the radiator;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a modified form of upper radiator tank adapted to be used in my improved combination, parts of which are broken away to show details of construction;

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of Fig. 5 viewed in the direction of arrow A of Fig. 5 and parts of which are broken away to show details of construction.

In the particular embodiments of the invention, which are disclosed herein merely for the purpose of illustrating certain specific forms among possible others that the invention might take in practice, I have shown in Fig. 1 a conventional type of locomotive having a underframe supported upon usual trucks 8 which may be provided with electric motors supplied with current;

from an electric generator 9. The generator is driven by a suitable internal combustion engine Hl whose cooling liquid is circulated through a suitable air cooled radiator generally indicated at H. The cab structure and control equipment do not, of course, form a part of my present invention and hence need not be described, except in so far'as the front end of a hood is brought into supporting relation to the engine bed.

The engine bed as shown in Fig. 3 is herein considered to broadly comprise, as a self-contained unit, a cylinder base l2 andan integrally formed forwardly projecting radiator base generally indicated at I3, the cylinder base I2 being of any suitable shape or structure adapted for the particular design of engine used. The integral bed structure may be either cast or built up by welded plates. 5

The radiator base I3 comprises (Fig. 2) upper and lower horizontal walls M and I5 which are substantially the width of the cylinder base |2 adjacent thereto, while the forward portion spreads out. laterally as indicated at l6 and I] (Fig. 3). To insure maximum rigidity between the elements l2 and I3, there is provided gussets l8 and I9 preferably merged with side walls 29 (Fig. 2) for the horizontal walls I4 and I5.

Formed around the two sides and front end of the forward laterally projecting portion of base l3 are side channels 2|, 22 and 23, these having preferably portions 24 (Fig. 3) raised above the upper horizontal wall I l. The side channels 2| and 22 thereby provide a substantial liquid pocket to which the lower endv 25 of a series of radiator sections 26 is connected for communication therewith as well as having the necessary communication with the large water space formed in channels 2|, 22 and 23. The inner wall of channels 2| and 22 may curve around as at 24 to terminate adjacent the forward end of the cylinder base. While the remaining inner space between the upper and lower walls l4 and 5 is preferably not used, yet it could be used for additional water space if desired while at them same time performing its present function of reinforcing said base.

A down draft air opening 29 for cooling the V 33 preferably mitered with the vertical channels An upper radiator tank is generally indicated at 32 (Fig. 3) supported upon a framework having upright channels 33 located at each corner of the forward laterally spread portion of base l3. The front and rear sets of vertical channels are connected by transverse channels or beams 33.' The transversechannels thusprovide an ample supporting surface upon which the tank 32 rests. The upper tank 32 comprises hollow sides 34 and 35 of rectangular box section connected to and communicatingwith end sections 36 and 31 which have a portion projecting above the elevavertical channels 33. This improved arrangement a of radiator sections and intermediate manifold 4| insures not only a rigid framework for supporting the upper radiator tank 32 but also permits advantages tobe obtained relative tothe shorterradiator.sections. I c

' As shown in Fig. 2, a. radiator fan 56 is mounted on a vertical axis tobe driven bya motor 46. This fan unit is supported upon and projects downwardly between'two horizontal channel beams 43 (Fig. 3) secured to the transverse channelss33 of the framework which supports the upper radiator tank 32. To provide a circular passage for fan 45, a circular sheet metal wall 46, Fig. 2, is concentric to the fan blades while a horizontal sheet 41. fills in the space between said circular sheet 46' and the four corners of the upper radiator tank 32. As shown in Fig. 4, which is a section on erally inwardly over the radiator sections on opposite sides of the supporting framework and thence discharge the air upwardly through a suitable'openingfafl in the top of hood Also blower.

35 (Fig; 2) will draw'air laterally. inwardly over the radiator sections and discharge such airto the electric motorsof trucks 8. r

To provide a pleasing appearance for the front end of the hood, my improved radiator supporting structure is provided (Fig. ,3) with a pair of'forwardly projecting angle'plates 53 and 54 suitably secured to the sides of channels 2| and 22ofthe' irons .54. A vertical framework consisting of the'engine lubricatingloil. suitable'partitions 51 and. 58 (Fig. 3) are'provided in the Water-leg35 of the. upper water tank while similar partitions generally indicated at 59 are provided in the channel 22, it being understood that in this particuage of .oil into the water or vice versa. 7 opening 11 is circular and is substantiallyconlar arrangement the legs 2| and 34 are used entirely for water and hence remain in communication with the transverse legs and with that portion of legs 22 and 35 not used for, oil. To avoid any possibility of leakage fromthe oil chambers 6|) and 6| into the Water chambers formed in the remaining portion of the upper and lower tanks, I have provided an additional set of partitions 62 and 63. The space between partitions 51and 62 and between 59 and 63 is void and preferably provided with asuitable drain opening similar to the -one at I6, Fig. 5. a In the modification shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the upper. tank is an integral casting generally indicated at 65 supported upon vertical channels 66 corresponding to the channels 33 of Fig. 3. The

channels 66 are secured directly tothe sides of the a casting as generally indicated at 61 while suitable ..transverse angle irons 68 connect the vertical channels and provide additional support for the under side of the tank 65. "The radiator sections aresecured respectively to the two sides 69and 10 which are provided with openings (Fig; 6).

for communication with the chambers 72 and 13,

' ment by a; pair of double walled partitions l4 and 15, thereby forming a space which is void and provided with drain openings l6 to prevent leak- The fan centric to the outer wall of the tank 65. Liquid is received in inlet openings 71 and thence flows outwardly through the side openings-1| and down through the radiator sections into the intermediate manifold 4| and through the lower set of radiator sections into the base chambers from which water is drawn (Fig. 1) through a pipe 19 to a water pump 80 and'thence through the cylinder jacket to a pipe BI and the inlet 11. Oil is drawn upwardly from the engine crankcase sump through a pipe 82, pump 83 and thence through pipe 84 and inlet 18 to flow down through the upper and lower radiator sections to be forced under pressure through a pipe 85 to the engine parts to be lubricated.

The foregoing system of piping and pumps is used with both modifications shown in Figs. 3 and 5.

From-the foregoing disclosure it is -seen-that I have. provided a cooling system apparatus that is highly rigid, compact and self-contained with the engine bed, thereby avoiding the complica-.,

tions and cost of manufacture, installation and maintenance that are incident to the many prior I the radiator sections with minimum structure for supporting the air circulating means, it also being noted that every advantage is taken to utilize various elements for a multiplicity of functions such for example as the blower30 located within the radiator construction so as to induce flow' of air over the radiator sections beforesuch air is'passed over the truck motors. This air may be slightly heated in passing overthe sec-.

tions, but it will still be adapted to eiiectively cool thetruck motors. i r r It'will of course be understood that various.

changes in details 10f construction and arrangement of partsmay be made'by thoseskilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, an engine bed having as a self-contained integral unit a cylinder base and a radiator base with a water chamber therein, an upper tank having horizontally spaced chambers with a vertically extending cooling air passageway therebetween, a frame projecting upwardly from the radiator base for supporting said upper tank, radiator sections supported by said radiator base and communicating with said chamber and tank, water chambers, and radiator sections communicating therewith.

2. In combination, an engine bed having as a self-contained integral unit a cylinder base and a radiator base provided with a water chamber, an upper tank. having horizontally spaced chambers with a vertically extending cooling air passageway therebetween, means for supporting said upper tank by said radiator base, radiator sections extending from said chamber base to said upper tank at the sides thereof, and means for circulating air horizontally and inwardly of said radiator sections and thence upwardly through said vertical passageway.

3. In combination, an engine bed having as a self-contained integral unit a cylinder base and a radiator base provided with a water chamber, means forming an upper radiator chamber having a walled vertical opening extending therethrough, means for supporting said upper chamber by said radiator base, radiator sections supported at the sides of said upper chamber and said radiator base, and a blower located within said opening for circulating air horizontally and inwardly over said radiator sections and thence upwardly through said opening.

4. In combination, an engine bed having as a self-containedintegral unit a cylinder base and a forwardly projecting radiator base, means forming a water channel around the sides and the end of said radiator base, means forming an upper tank of rectangular shape with chambers formed around the sides thereof and a vertical opening located between said sides, radiator sections connected tosaid channel in the base and to the upper tank, and means for circulating air horizontally and inwardly over said radiator sections and thence upwardly through said vertical radiator base with a water chamber therein, an

upper tank having horizontally spaced chambers with a vertically extending cooling air passageway therebetween, a frame projecting upwardly from the radiator base for supporting said upper tank, an intermediate manifold carried by said frame, and radiator sections comprising upper and lower portions connected to said manifold and respectively connected to and supported by the radiator base and to the upper tank for communication with the chambers therein.

CARL L. BLANTON.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION. Patent No. 2,12L 52 July 26, 19 8.

CARL L. BLANTON.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 2, first coiumn, line 50, for the reference numeral "56" read h); page 5, first column, line 15, after the first come. and before "watefl insert the words said radiator base and upper tank having partitions forming oil and; and that I the said Letters Patent shouldbe read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the reeord of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 50th day of August, A. D. 1958.

Henryvan Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5778832 *Apr 14, 1997Jul 14, 1998Kohler Co.Modular radiator for an engine-generator set
US6179043 *May 27, 1999Jan 30, 2001Caterpillar Inc.Heavy vehicle radiator with center-mounted hydraulic cooling fan motor and hydraulic motor oil cooler
US6450133 *Sep 19, 2000Sep 17, 2002Solutions Jupiter Inc.Partitioned container for high output mobile generator
US7165442 *Dec 7, 2004Jan 23, 2007General Electric CompanyMethod of detecting a water leak in a locomotive
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/41.49, 165/122, 123/41.48, 165/140
International ClassificationF01P3/20
Cooperative ClassificationF01P3/20
European ClassificationF01P3/20