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Publication numberUS2124808 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1938
Filing dateSep 14, 1936
Priority dateSep 14, 1936
Publication numberUS 2124808 A, US 2124808A, US-A-2124808, US2124808 A, US2124808A
InventorsRegin Earl L, White Clarence A
Original AssigneeKieckhefer Container Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container for canned goods or the like
US 2124808 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 26, 1938. 3, A, w rr r AL 2,124,808

SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR CANNED GOODS OR THE LIKE Filed Sept. 14, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. c: 2%:

ATTORNEY y 26, 1938- c.-.A. WHITE ET AL 2,124,808

SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR CANNED GOODS OR THE LIKE Filed Sept. 14, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 49 I 22" I I wai u 1 I M A oRNEy' July 26, 1938, Q W n-g ET L 2,124,808

SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR CANNED GOODS OR THE LIKE Filed Sept. 14, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 1 N VENTOR. yam. GM

Patented July 26, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Olarence A. White, Delair, N. J., and Earl L.

Regin, mesne assignments,

San Francisco, Calif., assignors,

to Kieckhefer Container Company, Delair, N. J., a corporation of Delaware Application September 14, 1936, Serial No. 100,654

16 Claims. (Cl. 229-27) This invention relates to improvements in shipping containers for canned goods or the like. Heretofore canned goods has been packed in fiber or corrugated board shipping containers, and no practical and economical means has been provided for separating of the individual cans within the shipping container or for preventing the cans from denting one another during shipment. Packers of food products are constantly bothered by complaints as to the condition in which their cans arrive at the retailers, and these packers are not only desirous of eliminating these complaints, but also their products on the retailers shelves. This difficulty is particularly serious in connection with products such as canned pineapple, which are shipped unusual distances and wherein the transfer of the shipping containers from one medium of transportation to another is necessary. 7

Various separating devices have heretofore been manufactured for use in packing commodities of different shape and nature than the articles for which the present invention is intended, but these prior structures are not suitable for the packing of cylindrical articles having fiat ends, such as cans, wherein for the purpose of economy in shipment, the ends of the cans of one layer must be in registration with the ends of the cans of the layer above and wherein no substantial amount of lost space between adjacent cans of the same layer is permitted.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved shipping container having novel means for separating cans therein and for minimizing the possibility of the cans denting one another during shipment and delivery.

' A more specific object of the invention is to provide an improved shipping container for the purpose described, having members positionable at the top and bottom of the container between the end flaps thereof and provided with inwardly projecting can-separating means, said,

members being cooperable, in certain instances,

' with specially constructed end flaps in performing said separating function.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved shipping container having canseparating members cooperable with specially constructed end closure flaps, wherein the side closure flaps are retained in conventional form so that conventional sealing methods may be employed in closing the case.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved shipping container as above deof improving the appearance of scribed wherein the can-separating members not only perform a separating function but also serve to brace the container and render the same more rigid.

Other objects of the invention are to provide a shipping container for canned goods or the like wherein the container proper is formed from in fiat form to the packer; wherein the process of packing cans in the container is relatively simple; and wherein the weight of the packed shipping container is not appreciably increased.

With the above and other objects in view, the invention consists of the improved shipping container for canned goods or the like and all its parts and combinations as set forth in the claims and all equivalents thereof.

In the accompanying drawings illustrating preferred embodiments of the invention wherein the same reference numerals designate the same parts in all of the views:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shipping container with the top closure flaps open, the dotand-dash lines showing the end flaps folded to separating position and showing the auxiliary separating member in position;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of said container with the end flaps and auxiliary separating device in position and with the side closure flaps open;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-4 of Fig. 2, the side closure flaps being in closing position;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of one form of auxiliary separating member for use inthe top of the container;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of one form of auxiliary separating device for use in the bottom of the container;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of a shipping container with a different form of auxiliary separatingmember in position;

Fig. 7 is aperspective view of said modified the end flaps in separating position and with the auxiliary separating member in place;

Fig. 11 is a sectional view taken on line of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the auxiliary separator used in conjunction with this form of shipping container;

Fig. 13 is a sectional view taken on line |3|3 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken on line |4--|4 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 15 is a perspective view of another form of separating member;

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view through the upper portion of a container showing how the separator of Fig. 15 may be employed;

Fig. 17 is a perspective view of still another form of separator;

Fig. 18 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view through the upper portion of a container showing how the separator of Fig. 17 may be employed;

Fig. 19 is a perspective view of another form of separating member;

Fig. 20 is a perspective view of a container with the end flaps and side closure flaps open, showing the separator of Fig. 19 in position;

Fig. 21 is a perspective view of a smaller shipping container showing a separating member positioned therein and particularly designed for this size of case; and

Fig. 22 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through the container of Fig. 21, the container flaps being in closing position.

Referring more particularly, first to Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive of the drawings, the numeral l5 designates a shipping container of the conventional form for holding two layers of cans, each layer accommodating one dozen cans. The container is preferably made of either fiber board or corrugated board and comprises four foldably connected wall portions I6, there being top closure flaps ll, l8, l9 and 28 foldably connected to the upper edges of said walls I6, and similar bottom closure flaps 2|, 22, 23 and 24 foldably connected to the lower edges of said side walls ii. In order to produce the shipping container proper no change is necessary in the present box-forming machinery except that lines of scoring 25 and 26 must be formed in the flaps l9 and 20 respectively as shown in Fig. 1 to provide bendable flanges 21 and 28; and the corresponding bottom closure flaps are preferably cut off short as at 29 and 38 (see Fig. 3).

A top separating member 33 (see Fig. 4) may be formed from a flat sheet of fiber board or corrugated board scored along parallel lines 34, 34' and 35 to provide for folding of the member 33 to the condition of Fig. 4 so as to form a depending separating flange or ridge 36 of double thickness.

A similar auxiliary separating ,member 31 for use in the bottom of the container (see Fig. 5) is also provided, and said member has its central portion formed with parallel lines of scoring 38,

39 and 48 so that the member is foldable to the position of Fig. 5 to provide an upwardly pro- Y jecting flange or ridge 4| of double thickness. This bottom auxiliary separating member is also preferably formedwith additional lines of scoring 42 and 43 adjacent opposite edge portions to provide upwardly bent edge'flanges 44 and 45 respectively.

To pack this type of shipping container the bottom closure flaps 2| and 22 are folded to the position of Figs. 1 and 3, the inner surfaces being covered with an adhesive. The other pair of bottom flaps 23 and 24 which have already been folded inwardly to the position of Fig. 3 are thus united to the flaps 2| and 22 by means of the adhesive. Next, the auxiliary separating member 31 for use in the bottom of the container is folded to the position of Fig. 5 and inserted in the manner shown in Fig. 3, the flanges 44 and 45 closely engaging the edges of the end flaps as at "29 and 38. The cans forming the bottom layer are then placed in position to form four parallel rows 46, 41, 48 and 49, there being three cans in each row. It is apparent that the row 45 is separated from the row 41 by the flange 45, that the row 41 is separated from the row 48 by the flange 4|, and that the row 48 is separated from the row 49 by the flange 44. It is also apparent that the flanges fit snugly between the rows of cans to leave no room for shifting movement.

Next the 'cans forming the upper layer are placed in the containerto form four rows 58, 5|, 52 and 53. The upper closure flap 28 is then bent inwardly from the full line position of Fig. 1

to the dot-and-dash line position therein, the

flange 28 being inserted between the rows of cans 58 and 5| as shown more clearly in Fig. 3. The other closure flap i9 is folded inwardly in a similar manner with its flange 21 inserted between the rows of cans 52 and 53. The top auxiliary separating member 33 is then placed on top of the rows of cans 5| and 52 with the flange or rib 36 separating the rows of cans 5| and 52. Next, adhesive is brushed over the tops of the flaps l9 and 28 and over the top of the auxiliary member 33, and the closure flaps I1 and I8 are then folded to closing position into contact withthe adheslvely coated surfaces.

In Fig. 6 a very similar arrangement is illustrated wherein the auxiliary separating members 54 are of slightly different form as shown more clearly in Fig. '7. These members 54 are scored in a direction at right-angles to the direction of scoring of the separating member 33 so that they are foldable to provide inwardly extending flanges 55 and. 56, which flanges are adapted to separate the six center cans into three groups of two cans each as clearly shown in Fig. 6. The bottom of the container of Fig. 6 may be constructed in an identical manner to the top, using one of the auxiliary separating members 54.

In Fig. 8 a slight modification ofthe separating member. 54 is shown wherein the member is die-cut as'at 51, 58 and 59 to provide inwardly foldable tongues .60, Si and 62, which tongues extend at right-angles to the flanges 55 and 56. It is apparent that the separating member of Fig. 8 will provide individual separation of the six center cans in each layer due to the fact that the tongues 68, 6| and 62 provide for additional separation.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive, it is apparent that a construction has here been provided wherein' each can is separated from every other adjacent can in the same layer. The shipping container proper is of identical construction to that shown in Fig. 1-

except that the end closure flaps l9 and 28' at the top, and the closure flaps 23' and 24' at the bottom are each die-cut as at 63 to provide inwardly bendable tongues or flanges 84. The top and bottom'auxiliary separating members may be identical and are shown in Fig. 12 and indicated by the numeral 85. Each of these members is scored centrally along three parallel lines 88, 61 and 88 to provide for the formation of a flange or ridge 88 of double thickness. Each separating member is further die cut as at 18 to provide for the formation of inwardly foldable tongues H, which tongues extend at right-angles to the flange 68.

This container is packed and closed in the same manner as used in connectionwith the form shown in Fig. 1 except that at the bottom, the individual cans of the row 48 are separated from one another by the inwardly extending tongues 64 in connection with the bottom flap 24; the individual cans of the row 48' are separated by the tongues 84 in connection with the closure flap 23; and the individual cans of the rows 41' and 48' are separated by the tongues ll of the bottom auxiliary separating member 85. The cans of the rows 58,.5l', 52 and 53' forming the top layer are also individually separated in a similar manner by the tongues 84 of the top flaps l8 and 28' and by the tongues ll of the top auxiliary separating member. As a result of this form of the invention, it is apparent that each can is maintained out of contact with It is also ap- I adjacent cans in the same layer. parent that all of the flanges and tongues fit snugly between the cans to prevent shifting of the latter.

Theseparating member shown in Fig. 15 consists of a flat section of fiberboard, corrugated board, pr other suitable material 12 die-cut as at 13 to provide an inwardly bendable tongue 14. This tongue is insertable between the rows of cans I5 and 18 (see Fig. 16) of a container of the same type as shown in Fig. 1 and having end closure flaps I1 and I8 provided with inwardly bendable flanges l8 and 88 respectively. The flange I9 is insertable between the rows of cans 8| and I5, and the flange 88 is insertable between the rows of cans 82 and 16. The side closure flaps 83 united to the separating member 12 and to the closure flaps I1 and 18 in the same manner as heretofore explained in connection with Fig. 1.

The separating member 12' shown in Fig. 17 is of similar form to the separating member 12 shown of Fig. 15 and is die cut'as at 18' to form an inwardly bendable tongue 14'. This form of separating member, however, is also provided with inwardly bendable edge flanges 88 for use in the manner shown in Fig. 18 in connection with end closure flaps 11 and a container having its 18 cut short and lacking the inwardly bendable flanges 18 and 88 of the ffim shown in Fig. 16.

Referring to Fig. 19, the separating member 85 shown therein is die-cut inwardly bendable tongues 81 for separating the individual cans of the two middle rows as shown in Fig. 20. A separate transverse tongue-forming member 88, preferably L-shaped in crosssection, is connected in any desired manner to the member 85. For example, the member 85 may beslotted-as at 88, andthe member'88 inserted in the slot as illustrated in Fig. 19. The member 88 may also be glued or stitched in position. This type of separating member may be used in conjunction with the container of Fig. 9, or the container of Fig. 9 maybe modified as shown in Fig. 20, to employ diamond-shaped tongues 88 which are formed by die-cutting the end flaps as at 8|. Thus, the container of Fig.

are then folded over and adhesively' as at 88 to provide 20 provides for separation of all of the individual cans from one another.

The separating member 82 illustrated in Fig. 21, is particularly adapted for use in a shipping container having only three rows of cans, such as the container 88. The member 82 -is of a length substantially the same as the width of the container and is formed with edge flanges 94 insertable between the rows of cans. The end flaps 85 of the container are of such length that the free edges 88 abut the flanges 84 sothat there is a continuous'surface to which the container side flaps 81 may be glued, as shown in Fig. 22.

It is apparent that the structure is simple to manufacture, that the shipping containers proper may be shipped in collapsed-form, and that the separators may be shipped flat in stacks. It is also apparent that the packing of cans in the containers is relatively simple and that the cans will be efiectively held against shifting movement and that damage from denting will be reduced to a minimum. It is also apparent that the container is additionally strengthened and braced by the separating members, and that conventional sealing methods may be employed.

While it is a feature of the invention that this method of can separation may be employed in connection with shipping containers of standard construction, with but slight modification, it is of course possible to utilize the principle of the invention in connection with shipping containers of various other forms and of various capacities.

While several forms of the invention have been shown and described, it is obvious that various.

changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, and

all of such changes are contemplated as may come within the scope of the claims.

What we claim is:

1'. A shipping container forcanned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body portion having transverse portions which terminate short of one another when said flaps are folded over the contents of the container, said transverse portions being provided with inwardly projected flanges positioned for insertion between certain cans within the container, a member covering the contents of the container not covered by said end flaps, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure flaps and over said last-mentiOned member.

' 2- A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, closure flaps in connection with said body portion, one pair of closure flaps having end portions bent inwardly and positioned for insertion between certain of the cans within the container, separating means positioned between said inwardly bent end portions and having inwardly extending means poone of said closure flaps being provided with an inwardly projecting flange positioned for insertion between certain of the cans Within the container to maintain the same out of contact with one another, and auxiliary separating means positionable adjacent said closure flaps and having means projecting between other cans within the container.

4. A shipping container of a size to hold one or more layers of cans with four rows of cans in each layer comprising a body portion, a closure flap in connection with one end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the first and-second rows, a closure flap in connection with the other end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the third and fourth rows, auxiliary separating means positionable over the cans of the second and third rows and having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of said second and third rows, and closure flaps in connection with the sides of the body portion foldable over said end closure flaps and over said auxiliary separating means to close the container.

5. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, and closure flaps in connection with said body portion, at least one of said closure .flaps being provided with an inwardly projecting flange positioned for insertion between certain of the cans within the container to maintain the same out of contact with one another, and said closure flap being diecut to provide inwardly bendable can-separating flanges extending at right-angles to the firstvide inwardly bendable can-separating tongues extending at right-angles to the lines of scoring which define the flange.

7. A shipping container of a size to hold one or more layers of cans with four rows of cans in each layer comprising a body portion, a closure flap in connection with one end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the first and secnd rows, a closure flap in connection with the other end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the third and fourth rows, auxiliary separating means positionable over the cans of the second and third rows and having inwardly projecting can-separating means, and closure flaps in connection with the sides of the body portion foldable over said end closure flaps and over said auxiliary separating means to close the container.

8. A shipping container of a size to hold one or more layers of cans with four rows of cans in each layer comprising a body portion, a closure flap in connection with one end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans ofthe first and second rows and having other inwardly projecting flanges extending at right-angles to said lastmentioned flange and positionable between the "individual cans of said first row, a closure flap in connection with the other end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the third and fourth rows and having other inwardly projecting flanges extending at right-angles to said last-mentioned flange and positionable between the individual cans of said fourth row, auxiliary separating means positionable over the cans of the second and third rows and having inwardly projecting can-separating means, and closure flaps in connection with the sides of the body portion ioldable over said end closure flaps and over said auxiliary separating means to close the container.

9. A shipping container of a size to hold one or more layers of cans with four rows of cans in each layer comprising a body portion, a closure flap in connection with one end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the first and second rows and having other inwardly projecting flanges extending at right-angles to said last-mentioned flange and positionable between the individual cans of said first row, a closure flap in connection with the other end of said body portion having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of the third and fourth rows and having other inwardly projecting flanges extending at right-angles to said last-mentioned flange and positionable between the individual cans of said fourth row, auxiliary separating means positionable over the cans of the second and third rows having an inwardly projecting flange positionable between the cans of said second and third rows and having other inwardly projecting flanges extending at right-angles to said last-mentioned flange and positionable between the individual cans of said second and third rows, and closure flaps in connection with the sides of the body portion foldable over said end closure flaps and over said auxiliary separating means to close the container.

10. A can-separating device for use in a shipping container for canned goods comprising a body portion positionable over the cans in a container and having inwardly projecting means insertable between rows of cans in the container, said body portion being die-cut on each side of said inwardly projecting means to provide other inwardly bendable separating tongues extending at right-angles to said first-mentioned inwardly extending means.

11. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and having transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over the contents of the container, a separating member positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, said separating member having an opening cut therein, a tongue extending transversely of the container and projecting inwardly from said opening for separating articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure flaps and over said separating member.

12. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and having transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over the contents of the container, a separating member positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, saidv separating member being die-cut to provide an inwardly bendable tongue for separating articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said and closure flaps and over said separating member.

13. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and having transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over the contents oi the container, a separating member positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, said separating member being die-cut to provide an elongated slot extending transversely of the container and to provide a tongueformed from the cut material and bendable inwardly from an edge of said slot for separating articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure flaps and over said separating member.

14. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and havin transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over an the contents of the container, a separating member positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, said separating member having an opening cut therein, a tongue extending transversely oi the container and projecting inwardly from said opening for separating articles within the container, said separating member having other inwardly projecting tongues extending at rightangies to said first-mentioned tongue for additionally separating articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure flaps and over said separating member.

15. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and having transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over the contents of the container, a separating member-positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, said separating member having an opening cut therein, a tongue extending transversely of the container and projecting inwardly from said opening for separating articles within the container, said separating member and end flaps having other inwardly projecting tongues extending at right-angles to the first-mentioned tongue of the separating member for additionally separating articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure and over said separating member.

16. A shipping container for canned goods or the like comprising a body portion, end closure flaps in connection with said body and having transverse portions at their swinging ends which are spaced apart when said flaps are folded over the contents of the container, a separating member positioned over the contents of the container between said transverse portions of said end flaps, a tongue which is L-shaped in cross-section having a portion connected to the separating member to lie in the plane thereof and having a portion projecting inwardly to separate articles within the container, and side closure flaps foldable over said end closure flaps and over said separating member.

CLARENCE A. WHITE.

EARL L. BEGIN.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/120.4, 229/120.24, 229/120.14, 206/427, 206/430
International ClassificationB65D5/48, B65D5/49
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/48024
European ClassificationB65D5/48B