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Publication numberUS2125753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1938
Filing dateApr 9, 1930
Priority dateApr 9, 1930
Publication numberUS 2125753 A, US 2125753A, US-A-2125753, US2125753 A, US2125753A
InventorsSpencer George P
Original AssigneeSpencer George P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of treating coal, coke, and the like
US 2125753 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Aug. 2, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE George P. Spencer, New York, N. Y.

No Drawing.

10 Claims.

This invention relates to an improvement in a process of treating fuels, such as hard and soft coal and coke, by coating the same with a suitable liquid, whereby to render the coal and coke dustless and to provide for the protection of said coating against the weather, also to augment thereby the fuel value of the coal and coke.

One of the objects of my invention is to coat the fuel with a dust-allaying liquid, which has a 3 fuel value.

Another object of my improvement is to pre-' vent the washing away of the said liquid coating from the coal and coke when the latter is exposed to rain and bad weather.

A further object of my improvement is to provide a dust-allaying liquid coating for coal and coke, which will not evaporate from the coal, when the latter is stored, at either high or low temperatures nor at any degree of humidity oil the atmospheric air.

A further object of my improvement is to provide a dust-allaying liquid coating for fuel, such as coal and coke, which will incidentally also improve the appearance of the fuel, by making 5 the latter bright and lustrous. A still other object of my improvement is to have the said coating liquid of a nature and composition which will prevent the coal and coke from freezing when it is exposed to low temperatures; said coating having a low freezing point.

Another object ofv my improvement is to have said coating liquid of a composition that will not corrode metals;

Thus, it will be noted that by the use of oils ;5 of any suitable nature, and by the process herein outlined, the color of coal and the like may be enhanced so that when the same is stored in the open it may be protected against weathering or graying and also against freezing due to the film l coating on the coal, and allays the dust.

Almost any oil is useful for this purpose and it is to be understood that I am not to be limited to any particular kind of oil but, from an economic standpoint, it is obvious that in the treatment of the coal and'coke by the herein process fuel oil or low grade oils, which are not costly,-

would be a satisfactory source of supply for treating coal, coke and the like.

While I have referred 'to modifications herein in the form of emulsified oil treatment, it 'is obvious that some oils are better adapted for'the purpose herein outlined when untreated and unmixed with other ingredients, while, on the other 5 hand, some oils may require treatment or mixing Application April 9, 1930, Serial (Cl. 44--u with other materials to change their viscositie or other latent conditions thereof.

I attain these objects by the process which consists in putting a thin film of oil over the coal or coke. This can be done either by immersing the coal or coke, which is to be treated, in a bath of oil, or by spraying the fuel with oilunder pressure, whereby the entire surface of each individual piece of coal is coated with a film or thin layer of. oil. w

Satisfactory results are also obtainable with anon-evanescent oil, which has been diluted with some other liquid before treating the coal.

Successful results have been attained by an oil-water emulsion, consisting of one part of 1/,

' Standard 18 plus fuel oil, ten parts of water and a minute quantity of an emulsification agent, such as clay, soap and the like. v

A satisfactory coating liquid is also obtained by the dilution of an asphalt emulsion. One part 20 of the emulsion is added to ten parts of water, and this mixture will remain uniform without agitation. A

Both of the above noted coating liquids will leave the surface of the coal or coke covered with a waterproof coating, after the excess of water has evaporated.

Oil can also be diluted with naphtha, gasolene, kerosene, carbon tetrachloride, and other agents; but these are more costly. so

Practically all oils are suitable for treating coal or coke for the above mentioned purposes; but for commercial use the cheaper oils, such as those sold as fuel oils or road oils are most prac- 13108.1.

Variations are possible, and some of the above ingredients may be used without other ingredients. l I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent: 40

1. In a process of treating coal or coke the part process consisting in applying to said coal or coke a surface coating of an oil-water mixture consisting of one part of Standard 18 plus fuel oil, ten parts of water and a minute quantity of a mixing agent, such as clay, soap, etc., and subsequently retaining said coating upon the exterior of the material.

2. In a process of treating coal or coke the part process consisting in applying to said coal 5 or coke a surface coating of an oil-water emulsion, formed by the dilution of an asphalt emulsion, and subsequently retaining said coating, upon the exterior of the material.

3. In a process of treating coal or coke the emulsification agent such as clay, soap and the like; and retaining, on the entire surface of the pieces, a coating of the oil thick and adherent enough to increase the combustibility of the material, to absorb dust on the material dustless, to prevent the washing away of the coating by rain, to prevent evaporation from the material when stored at high temperature, to give the material a bright lustrous appearance, and to prevent the pieces from being frozen together when exposed to sleet and the like.

5. A process of treating commercial coal or coke, said process comprising -applying to said coal or coke a non-binding emulsion consisting of a quickly evaporating liquid and a slowly volatile emulsion of a substance selected from a group consisting of a petroleum and an asphalt; said emulsion having a viscosity sufilcient to render the coal substantially dustless and insufficient to cause the lumps of coal or coke to bind together or to cause clogging during flow in chutes.

6. A process of treating commercial coal or of a'quickly evaporating liquid and a slowly volatile petroleum oil; said emulsion having a viscosity sufficient to render the coal substantially dustless andinsufiicient to cause the lumps of coal or coke to bind together or to cause clogging during flow in chutes.

8. The method of treating coal and coke consisting of finely dividing an emulsion of one part of Standard 18 plus fuel oil with 10 parts of water to provide a spray; and then spraying the coal or coke in the spray, for a length of time suflicient to cover the pieces of coal or coke with an enveloping film of oil; the amount of oil adhering to the fuel by said spraying being such as will distribute a very small quantity of oil, substantially less than one-half gallon of oil over approximately one ton of coal or coke.

9. The method of treating coal and coke consisting of emulsifying a mineral oil of high gravity, high flash point and a high boiling point, in order that it will not evaporate at ordinary temperatures whereby to provide a fine mist or spray; and then spraying the coal or coke in the mist or spray, for a length of time sufflcient to deposit on the pieces of coal or coke, an enveloping film of oil of such amount as will distribute a small quantity of oil, substantially less than one gallon of oil over approximately one ton of coal or coke.

10. A process of treating commercial fuel mch as coal or coke, said process comprising applying to said coal or coke a non-binding emulsion consisting of water and a slowly volatile petroleum oil, to form a thin film on the fuel; said emulsion and the resulting film having a viscosity sufficient to render the coal substantially dustless, and insufiicient to cause the lumps of coal or coke to bind together or to cause clogging during flow in chutes.

GEORGE P. SPENCER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431891 *Mar 21, 1944Dec 2, 1947Joe F Klaner JrAsphalt emulsions for treatment of coal and method of preparing the same
US4147519 *Jun 27, 1977Apr 3, 1979International Telephone & Telegraph Corp.Coal suspensions in organic liquids
US4210423 *Apr 6, 1979Jul 1, 1980Mobil Oil CorporationSolid fuel use in small furnaces
US4251230 *Oct 26, 1978Feb 17, 1981International Telephone And Telegraph CorporationStabilized against sedimentation by adding a clay and alkanolamide surfactant; pumpability
US4264333 *Jun 25, 1979Apr 28, 1981Kaiser Resources, Ltd.Using a wetting agent and then an emulsion of coal tar in water
US4605421 *Sep 10, 1984Aug 12, 1986Kerr-Mcgee Chemical CorporationProcess for the preparation of a carbonaceous-derived solid fuel product
Classifications
U.S. Classification44/600, 44/602, 44/620, 44/607, 44/601
International ClassificationC10L9/00, C10L9/10
Cooperative ClassificationC10L9/10
European ClassificationC10L9/10