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Publication numberUS2126218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1938
Filing dateApr 16, 1936
Priority dateApr 16, 1936
Publication numberUS 2126218 A, US 2126218A, US-A-2126218, US2126218 A, US2126218A
InventorsSchulz Jr August R
Original AssigneeSchulz Jr August R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable window scaffold
US 2126218 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ug- 9, 1938 A. R. scHuLz, JR 2,126,218

ADJUSTABLE WINDOW SCAFFOLD Filed April 16, 1936 I l H Mk2@ I ,lr/50 36 Patented Aug. 9, 1938 NU'Nl'rlazl) STATES PATENT OFFICE ADJUSTABLE WINDOW SCAFFOLD August R. Schulz, Jr., St. Louis, Mo.V

Application April 16,

5 Claims.

The present invention relates generally toscaffolds, and more particularly to a window scaffold used in Washing windows and the like.

Window scalolds employed at the present time are subject to certain disadvantages. Under the present theory of window scaffold construction, there is provided 'ateach end of a frame work means for maintaining the device in a horizontal position relative to a window sill, or the like. One of such means usually contacts the inner sill upon a vertical surface while the other of such means similarly contacts the outside sill of the house, building, or the like upon a vertical surface. The latter means is generally restrained in its position against the side of a house by a chain, linkage or the like. Obviously, the breaking of such restraining means results in the unsettling of the device relative tothe window sill, which often causes death or severe injury to the user. Other disadvantages are inherent in the present day window scaffolds.

An object of the present invention isrlto provide a window scaffold constructed in such wise that all danger of the device breaking loose from the window sill is avoided. l

Another object is to provide a window scaffold which has securing means that effect a vise grip upon a window sill, or the like. Another object is to provide a window scaffold cheap in construction, easy to manufacture, simple to use; and effective in a variety of dispositions.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description thereof, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in Which:

Fig. 1 is a bottom view of an embodiment of a scaffold constructed in line with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the scaffold shown in Fig. 1, the device being in clamping position on a window sill.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fi-g. 4 is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Referring more particularly to the drawing by numerals, I indicates generally a metal window scaffold constructed according to the present invention. There is provided a frame comprising the channel members Il, which are disposed in slightly diverging relation. The bars I2, I3 and I4 are welded as at I5, I6 and I1, respectively, to the channel members to effect a rigid frame. For the user of the device, there is lo- 1936, Serial No. 74,687

cated on the bars a seat or platform I8, which is secured thereto by means of the return-flange I9 formed around three sides of the seat, and the right angle ange 20 formed around the fourth side. For assisting in securing the frame to a window sill, or the like, there are pivoted to the channel members, by the transverse pivot members 2|, strap bars 22. The strap bars are connected for simultaneous engagement with a surface by means of a cross strap 23, which is l welded or otherwise secured thereto. A chain 24 is connected to the bar I3 at 25 and to the cross strap 23 at 26 to restrain the pivotal movement of the strap bars 22 to less than ninety degrees. Each of the strap bars 22 includes at one end 15 a return-section 21 which provides a pivot sleeve 28. At the other end of each of said straps, there is a hook 29 which is covered by a jacket 30 of rubber or similar material. On the end of each channel member, remote from the seat or platform, there is disposed a channel section 32 which is adapted to receive in cooperation with the channel member II through selected aligned holes of the upper and lower series 33 and 34, respectively, the pin 35. Each of the pins is secured from loss by a chain 36 which is connected at 31 to its respective channel section.

Referring to Fig. 2, there is shown a window easement construction, including an inner sill and an outer sill 40, between which there is the '3o supporting member 4I. As disclosed in this view, in operative position the frame is disposed at an angle to the horizontal surface of the inner sill. In securing the scaffold to the window, the pins 35 contact the verticalsurface of the inner sill 35 39 while the strap members 22 rest upon the horizontal surface of thc outer sill 40 and abut the vertical surface of the member 4I. In this disposition of the cooperating securing means, it will be obvious that Weight applied to the seat or 40 platform will tend to force the said securing means together in a jaw-like action. Thus, the greater the force applied in a downward direction upon the seat, the rmer will be the hold of the securing means 35 and 22 upon the window, 45 No force whatsoever is applied to the chain 24 which in ordinary scaffold construction bears the greater force of any weight applied to the scaffold platform or seat.

It is, of course, apparent that the series of aligned holes 33 and 34 permit adjustment of the securin-g pins 35 relative to the cooperating securing means 22 to allow the use of the scaffold upon window sills of varying widths.

It will thus be clear from a reading of the above description, taken in conjunction with the drawing, that the applicant has provided a Window scaffold which is of strong construction, and which is positive in its securing relationship to a Window sill, or the like. Further description of structural details and operation appears to be unnecessary.

It is to be understood that the above description and the accompanying disclosures in the drawing are *given for the purpose of illustration and example, and not for limitation, the nvention being limited in scopelonly by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a window scaffold, a 'frame `comprising channel members disposed in diverging relation, a seat resting on one end of said members, complementary channel sections fixed in said members at the other ends thereof to provide spaced walls having aligned holes therethrough, pins l selectively extending through said holes adapted to contact avertical face of a window sill, vand interconnected securing bars, one pivoted toeach member adjacent the seat end having pivotal A.movement of less than 90 vbeneath the members and Y'adapted to engage in'supporting relation at the intersection horizontal and vertical planes .of anouter sill, whereby weight placed onv the seat .effects a .clamping .action between the pins and the bars .to firmly and positively retain the scaffold in placeon a window sill. Y

. l2. In a window scaffold, a frame comprising channel members disposed in diverging relation `in a common plane, cross members fixed to said channels towards Yonenpair of ends thereof and extending beyond said channels, a sheet metal seat covering said vbars and fixed thereto by return flanges thereof engaging one of said members along a longitudinal edge and all of the members at the ytransverse edges, lcomplementary short channel sections disposedl in opposed positions in the said channels at the ends remote from the seat to provideropposed vparallel horizontal surfaces, aligned -holes through said surfaces, cooperating pins adapted to extend through selected holes to provide one holding .means for the scaffold, and other holding means disposed beneath the seat and adapted to cooperate with said pins to hold the scaffold on a window ledge. 3. Ina window scaffold, a. frame including two longitudinally extending channel members, a seat on said members at one end thereof, complementary short channel sections disposed in opposed position in the said channel members at the other end thereof to provide opposed parallel horizontal surfaces, aligned holes through said surfaces, cooperating pins adapted to extend selectively through said holes to provide one holding means for the frame, said pins being adapted to extend into the box space defined by the channel members and the channel sections when the scaffold is not in use, and other holding means disposed beneath the seat adapted to cooperate with said pins.

4. In a window scaffold, a frame including two llongitudinally extending channel members, a seat on saidmembers at one end thereof, complementary short channel sections disposed in opposed position in ,the said channel members at the other end thereof to provide opposed parallel horizontal surfaces, aligned holes through said -surfaces, cooperating pins adapted to extend selectively through said-,holes to provide one holding means for the frame, and 'other holding means vdisposed beneath'the seat adapted to cooperate with said pins comprising connectedv bars of a width less than the width between the inner walls `of the channel members, each of said bars beingl pivoted between the walls of a channel member and adapted to swing intoclosed relation between said walls.

5. In a window scaffold, a frame including two longitudinally .extending channel members, a at seat on said members at one end thereof, complementary short channel sections disposed in opposed position inthe said channel members at the yother end thereof to provide opposed parallel horizontal surfaces, aligned holes through said surfaces, cooperating pins adapted to extend selectively through said holes to provide one holding means for the frame, said pins being adapted to extend into the box space defined by the channel members and the channel sections when the scaffold is not in use, and other holding means disposed beneath the seat adapted vto co.- operate with said pins comprising connected bars of a width less vthan the width between Ythe inner -walls of the channel members, each of said bars being pivoted between the walls of a channel lmember and adapted to swing into closed relaltion between said walls.

AUGUST R. SCHULZ, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2805103 *Apr 20, 1954Sep 3, 1957Casimer JovaisWindow scaffold
US2965195 *Apr 23, 1959Dec 20, 1960Paschen Clayton FPortable ladder for a manhole or the like
US4506928 *Mar 11, 1983Mar 26, 1985Gerber Products CompanyBaby chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification182/58
International ClassificationE04G3/18
Cooperative ClassificationE04G3/18
European ClassificationE04G3/18