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Publication numberUS2126224 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1938
Filing dateSep 16, 1936
Priority dateSep 16, 1936
Publication numberUS 2126224 A, US 2126224A, US-A-2126224, US2126224 A, US2126224A
InventorsPhillips Ralph T, Shaffer John W
Original AssigneeJohn W Shaffer & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traffic button
US 2126224 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. 9, 1938 I J. w. SHAFFER ET AL TRAFFIC BUTTON Filed Sept. 16, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORb 59 JOHN w. SHAFFER ATTORNEYS:

9, 1938. J. w. SHAFFER ET AL 2, 2

TRAFFIC BUTTON Filed Sept. 16, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS JOHN W, SHAFF'ER RALPH T. PHI LIPS ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 9, 1938 UNITED STATES TRAFFIC BUTTON John W. Shafier and Ralph T. Phillips, Minneapolis, Minn, assignors to John W. Shaffer &

Company, a corporation of Minnesota Application September 1 6 Claims.

This invention relates 'to improvements in traflic safety buttons of the type adapted to be placed on a division line or lines defining two or more traiflc lanes and to ,be illuminated by the lights of motor vehicles.

Objects of the invention: to reduce the weight; increase the strength; to prevent obliteration of the lenses by sedimentary deposits of earth during rains; and to provide a smooth top contour which is at a minimum level above that of the roa A particular object is to so reduce the thickness of the button that the shoes of snow plows will pass over the button without striking the 5 same and to accomplish this object without reducing the signalling efliciency of the reflectors. We have been able to accomplish a substantial reduction in thickness and yet give maximum of reflecting surface by the use of two small reflectors instead of one larger one. The use of these reflectors of smaller diameter or of smaller vertical height makes it possible to obtain as much or more reflection as when a single larger eye? or reflector is used. Although the circular form of cylindrically encased reflector is preferred, as well as the use of two small lenses, yet a single horizontally elongated and vertically narrowed reflector can be used. p

Another object is to so construct the button as to provide a free path for water transversely thereof, thus avoiding such sedimentation or damming or eddying as will obliterate or cover the reflectors. v

Another object is to provide openings leading to cross channels, downwardly through-which rain can fall to reach the surface of the road and flush the cross channels by streams moving in opposite directions.

Features of the invention include all details of construction along with the broader ideas of means inherent in the disclosure.

' Objects, advantages and features of the invention will appear in the description of the drawings and in said drawings:

Figure l is a top plan View illustrating the double reflector form of our device;

Figure 2 is an elevation, one-half in longitudinal section; p

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view;

Figure 4 is a vertical transverse section on line 44 of Figure 2; i Figure 5 is an end View further illustrating the arrangement of the pair of reflectors;

Figure 6 is a plane view of a-lmodifi'cation in which single reflectors are used;

6, 1936,- SerialNo. 101,096 (01. 88-79) Figured is a vertical longitudinal central section through the device of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a bottom plan view of the device of Figure 6; v V

Figure 9 is an end view of the device of Figure 6; and

Figure 10 is an end view of a modification showing the use of a single horizontally elongated reflector.

Numeral I generally designates a hollow central body portion or island and numerals 2, 3 respectively indicate end sections or islands spaced from the body. The bottom surfaces of the body and the end sections or elements are preferably elongated in a direction transverse to their direction of spacing as best indicated in Figure 3, although the invention is not entirely limited thereto. The bottom surfaces of the body and end sections are flat and are adapted to engage directly with corresponding surfaces of the road, and sealingly engage such a surface. The bottom of each end section is provided centrally thereof with a tubular extension 4 providing openings 5 through which fastening devices, not shown, are passed to secure the device to the road. Securing is generally accomplished by means of expansion bolts which form no part of this invention.

i A pair of arched elements I connect each end 2 section with the body. The members of each pair of arches I are so disposed as to form with the body and the corresponding end section, a cross drain channel indicated at In, the bottom of which channel is formed by the road, and the sides of which are formed by the body and the end section. By this means drainage cross channels are formed the bottom of each of which is formed by the road, when the button is attached. In this way also, openings are formed which communicate with the channels to allow entry of rain for flushing.

These arched elements '1 also define with the body and the end element, an outwardly opening recess indicated at [2 into which light can enter from above, as well as at angles which are acute to the long axis of the button indicated by line A. This axis is transverse to the direction of spacing of the end sections.

The inner wall I5 of the recess is defined by a wall E6 of the hollow central body I, and each wall has therein reflecting means disposed to be impinged by light entering the corresponding recess. A trafiic button having a single recess and a single lens is contemplated herein. The reflecting means may be a single lens It as in Figures 6 and 9, but is preferably constituted by two lenses such as indicated at I 9 in Figures 1 and 2. In practice the mounting shell of the lens has a diameter of from one-half to seveneighths of an inch. The diameter is preferably about one-half an inch and the overall vertical thickness or height of the button is about seveneighths of an inch. Thus when the button is attached it does not rise above the road sufficiently to be engaged by the shoes of the snow plows ordinarily used for cleaning the roads. Moreover by having a minimum of vertical height accidents are less likely, in case an auto vehicle wheel should pass over the button.

Each lens has its axis (indicated by the line B) inclined upwardly as shown in Figure 2. The lenses are arranged in openings or sockets 2| in walls I6 as shown in Figures 2 and 7, the shell mounting 20 having a shoulder 23 which engages with a' shoulder 24 of the opening 2|. Each casing has a screw indicated at 25 which projects through an opening in a plate 26, and this screw is threaded in a nut 21, which secures the plate. The shoulder 23 is forced against the shoulder 24 to sealingly secure the lens casing 20. Any type of reflector can be used.

It is noted that the end elements 2 and 3 are so spaced and the arch elements are as before stated,

so arranged that a vertical opening is provided in each recess which communicates with the cross channel ID, for flushing purposes. Thus Water falling into a recess l2 can flow outwardly in either direction, thus making sedimentation less likely. On the other hand, when the flow is laterally toward the button, free through-flow is obtained by the channel H).

The central elements and end sections may be considered as islands connected by bridges, the space between the islands constituting drain and flush channels.

The reflector casings 20 may touch one another at their inner sides, but are preferably spaced. A single elongated relatively vertically narrow reflector 60 may be used, the object being to obtain a maximum of reflection with a minimum of vertical height for the button. The advantage of two eyes or lenses is that light can be reflected for a longer time as the automobile approaches the button. That is, the reflector that is farthest from the automobile, or that portion of a single reflector will reflect when the machine is almost opposite to it. This relation is suggested by arrow C in Figure 1, in which C represents the one angle of impingement of the light on the farthermost reflector.

In Figures 6 to 9 inclusive is illustrated another form in which a single larger circular lens I8 is used. The body portion is indicated at 35 and the end elements or islands are indicated at 3631 and bridge elements are indicated at 38. In this case the bottom contour of the central body 35 is more nearly elliptical. The bottom contour of the end elements 36 and 31 differ from that of the body 35 each in having a substantially straight inner side 39. However, in this case as in the first case, drain channels generally indicated at 40 are provided. The inner side of each element, 363'l has a central surface 4| convex toward the body 35. The central body has walls 42 having openings 43, the axes of which are upwardly slanted as indicated by line D, and shoulders 44 are provided in the body which are engaged by corresponding shoulders 48 of the casings 49 which carry the reflecting lenses 18. A suitable spherical shell washer 5| engages over threaded extension 52 of casing 49, and a nut 53 is threaded on the extensions as shown. The reflector mountings are thus sealingly secured in the openings.

Each end element 36 and 31 is provided with a tubular extension 55 corresponding to the extensions 4 of the first form. Countersinks 56 are provided for the heads of the attaching bolts (not shown). It is understood that the heads preferably lie flush with the upper surfaces 51 of the end elements. The tubular extensions 4 and 55 are elongated in direction axially of the button and are convergently tapered downwardly.

In the appended claims, the passages l0 (Figures 1-5) and 4|] (Figures 6-10) are defined as extending in substantially a straight line across the button immediately in front of the light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of the button. It will be understood that the term substantially straight line is used in this connection in its broadest sense to include various flared or slightly curved end portions of the passage where such portions open outwardly on each side of the button. In other words, such term is used to include not only the forms of passages illustrated in Figures 3 and 8, but also to include obvious modifications thereof wherein the ends of the passages might be flared slightly in a forward or rear direction only, or one end might be flared forwardly and the opposite end flared rearwardly thereby defining a relatively flat and somewhat S-shaped passage.

We claim as our invention:

1. A trainc button having a central body portion and a pair of road attaching portions arranged on opposite sides of and each connected to but spaced from said body portion to define a transversely disposed passage, said attaching portions each being connected to said body portion solely by a pair of transversely spaced arched members bridging said passage and defining a longitudinally disposed recess therebetween which intersects the passage formed by the spacing between said central body portion and said attaching portions, and light reflecting means disposed on opposite sides of said body portion and arranged between each pair of said arched members, said passages each extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button.

2. A traific button having a central body portion and a pair of protecting portions arranged on opposite sides of and each connected to but spaced from said body portion to define a transversely disposed passage, said protecting portions each being connected to said body portion by a pair of transversely spaced arched members defining a longitudinally disposed recess which intersects the passage formed by the spacing between said central body portion and said protecting portions, and light reflecting means disposed on opposite sides of said body portion and arranged between said arched members, said passages each extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button.

3. A traffic button including a central body por- I versely disposed passage, an arch member bridg- 7 ing said passage and interconnecting said protective portion with said central body portion, and light reflecting means carried by said central body portion and projecting into said passage, said passage extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button and reflecting means.

4. A traflic button including a central body portion having a base adapted to engage the surface of a road, and a protective portion having a base adapted to engage the surface of the road, the base of said protective portion being spaced from the base of said central portion to define a transversely disposed passage, a pair of transversely spaced arch members bridging said passage and interconnecting said protective portion with said central portion, said arch members defining a recess open at the top and intersecting said passage, and light reflecting means projecting into said passage, said passage extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button.

5. A traffic button including a central body portion having a base adapted to engage the surface of a road, and a pair of road attaching portions arranged on opposite sides of said central body portion and each having a base adapted to engage the surface of said road, the bases of said attaching portions each being spaced from the base of said central portion to define a transversely disposed passage open toward the surface of the road, means bridging said passage and interconnecting each attaching portion with said central portion, and light reflecting means projecting into said passages, said passages each extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button and light reflecting means.

6. A trafiic button including a central body portion having a base adapted to engage the surface of a road, and a pair of road attaching portions arranged on opposite sides of said central body portion and each having a base adapted to engage the surface of said road, the bases of said attaching portions all lying in substantially a common plane and the bases of said attaching portions each being spaced from the base of said central portion to define a transversely disposed passage open toward the surface of the road, the side walls of said bases being curved to provide flared discharge openings for said passages, a pair of transversely spaced arch members bridging said passage and interconnecting each attaching portion with said central portion, each pair of said arch members defining a recess open at the top and which intersects said passage, and light refleeting means carried by said central body portion and projecting into each passage, said passages each extending in substantially a straight line across said button immediately in front of said light reflecting means and opening outwardly on each side of said button.

JOHN W. SHAFFER. RALPH T. PHILLIPS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3516337 *Mar 18, 1968Jun 23, 1970Gubela GuntherTraffic button or road marker
US3975108 *Jun 9, 1975Aug 17, 1976Itl Industries, Inc.Snow plowable pavement marker
US4147447 *May 12, 1978Apr 3, 1979Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4155666 *Jun 9, 1978May 22, 1979Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4195945 *Nov 24, 1978Apr 1, 1980Amerace CorporationSnowplowable pavement marker and base member therefor
US4232979 *Dec 18, 1978Nov 11, 1980Amerace CorporationPavement marker
US4340319 *Nov 10, 1980Jul 20, 1982Amerace CorporationPavement marker
US4358217 *Mar 24, 1980Nov 9, 1982Stone Walter EHighway traffic lane and road edge reflectors
US5454664 *Apr 7, 1994Oct 3, 1995Hallen Products Ltd.Roadway marker
US5839816 *Dec 13, 1995Nov 24, 1998Atsi, LlcFor insertion into a road surface
US6461077Feb 17, 2000Oct 8, 2002Hallen Products, Ltd.Reflector base
US7688222Feb 10, 2005Mar 30, 2010Spot Devices, Inc.Methods, systems and devices related to road mounted indicators for providing visual indications to approaching traffic
US7859431Jun 26, 2009Dec 28, 2010Spot Devices, Inc.Methods, systems and devices related to road mounted indicators for providing visual indications to approaching traffic
US20130202353 *Aug 10, 2012Aug 8, 2013Tecknotraffic Inc.Snowplowable road marker
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/16
International ClassificationE01F9/06, E01F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE01F9/06
European ClassificationE01F9/06