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Publication numberUS2126649 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1938
Filing dateApr 24, 1937
Priority dateApr 24, 1937
Publication numberUS 2126649 A, US 2126649A, US-A-2126649, US2126649 A, US2126649A
InventorsBerry Revere H, Lytle Samuel E
Original AssigneeHudson Motor Car Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal combustion engine
US 2126649 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 9, 1938. s. E. LYTLE ET AL INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed April 24, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 l` a l Rf. Y 56% M mi T ZM A I d@ w d mm m 2 M v l d y .M 4 M 2 k V p n f Aug- 9 1938 s. E. LYTLE ET AL 2,126,649

INTERNAL COMBUST ION ENGI IlIE Filed April 24, 1937 2 sheheef 2 ATT RNEY Patented Aug. 9, 193s 2,126,649

UNITED'STATES PATENT OFFICE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Samuel E. Lytle, Lochmoor, and Revere H. Berry, Detroit, Mich.,` assignors to Hudson Motor Car Company, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application April 24, 1937, Serial No. 138,708

9 claims. (o1. 12s-52) This invention relates to internal combustion engines and more particularly to devices for equalizing pressures in the passages of such engines delivering fuel mixture to the engine cylinders.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide an improved internal combustion engine of the multi-carburetor type, in which means are provided to equalize operation pressures in the intake manifolds of the engine at high loads, thereby making it possible to secure substantially maximum power output in said engine.

Another object of the invention is to provide means of the foregoing character which ensure independent operation of the carburetors and their respective cylinder groups at light loads or when idling, thereby preventing decrease of vacuum in the intake passages of the engine beyond the point when it becomes insufficient to draw the fuel from the carburetor jets.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved compensating device for multicarburetor internal combustion engines, which is simple in construction and dependable in operation, and is relatively cheap to manufacture.

Other objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

Fig. 1 is a top view of an internal combustion engine, partly in section, embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 isla vertical sectional View taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1 in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a transverse Vertical sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view of the valve assembly removed from the connecting conduit.

Fig. 5 is a perspectiveview of the compensating means, the manifolds being indicated by dotted lines, said view illustrating operation of the device when the engine is idling.

Fig. 6 is a view similar in part to Fig. 5, the valve being shown in its fully open position for illustrating operation of the device at high loads.

Before explaining in detail the present invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation, and it is not intended to limit the invention claimed herein beyond the requirements 'of the prior art.

In the drawings there is shown, by way of example, an internal combustion engine of the multi-carburetor type, constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. Referring to the drawings, said engine comprises a cylinder block IIJ in which there are provided a plurality of cylinders, in the present instance six, which cylinders are divided into two groups II and I2. The group II is supplied with fuel mixture by means of a carburetor I3 provided with a fuel jet It and an air passage I5 in which there is operatively disposed a throttle valve IE. The carburetor I3 is connected to the intake manifold II which connects the air passage I5 of said carburetor I3 with the cylinders'of the group II. The cylinder group I2 is supplied with fuel mixture by means of a similar carburetor I3 connected to the intake manifold I9. The structure so far described presents with respect to fuel distribution two separate three cylinder engines having a common crankshaft.` The operation of the carburetors I3 and I8 is completely independent from each other, and different pressures may actually exist in the intake manifolds I'I and I9 at the same moment of time. However, it should be noted that the firing order and the shape of the crankshaft are such that the cylinders draw the fuel mixture and fire one after another in a predetermined order, and that only one piston at a time sucks the fuel mixture through the carburetors of the respective group of cylinders.

In accordance with the present invention the pressures in the intake manifolds Il and I9 are equalized when the engine is operating at high loads, but the independent operation of the carburetors .and manifolds is retained when the engine is idling or is operating at light loads. The above result is attained by means of a conduit 20 connecting said manifolds I I and I9, inwhich conduit there is arranged a partition 2| provided with flanges 2Ia holding said partition in a desired place in said conduit by friction or in any other suitable manner. In the center of said partition 2I there is journalled a shaft 22 carrying a valve 23 comprising in the present embodiment of the invention two wings or sectors. In said partition 2I there .are provided two ports or openings 24 adapted tobefully covered by said wings of the valve 23. Rotation of the shaft 22 moves the wings of the valve 23 and uncovers said 5.5

ports or openings 24. The opposite ends of the shaft 22 protrude into the intake manifolds I1 and I9 and are provided with curved blades 25 and 26 secured thereto.

The operation of the above described means at light loads is illustrated in Fig. 5, and referring to said figure it can be seen that when the engine is operating at light loads and lowspeeds or is idling, the amount of air taken into each of the carburetors is relatively small, and therefore the flow of the fuel mixture to the manifolds l-'l and I9 is not sufficient to lift the blades 25 and 26 from their respective vertical positions. In such positions of the blades the ports 24 are closed or substantially so, and no substantial equalizing flow of fuel mixture between the manifolds |11 and I9 can take place. This ensures independent operation of the carburetorsv I3` and` i4 in the above specified operation conditions of the engine. Since volumetric efficiency of the engine at idling speed is of sufficientmagnitude, it is not necessary to seek the increase thereof bycausing separate pistons to suck the fuel mixtureV through two carburetors simultaneously. When, however, the throttle valves of the carburetors I3 and I4 are fully opened and the engine is running at high speed, or is delivering a high power output, the flow of the fuel mixture through the manifolds l'l and I9 will be strong enough to hold the blades 25 .and 2G in a substantially horizontal position. Such conditions are illustrated in Fig. 6, and referring thereto, it can be clearly seen that under such conditions the valve 23 fully opens the ports 24. If the pressure in one of the manifolds I1 or I9 is higher than in the other, the gaseous fuel mixture will ow through the conduit 20 and the openings 24v from the manifold withthe higher pressure to the manifold with the lower pressure, whereby substantially equal pressures will be maintained in said manifolds with only minor, negligible fluctuations. It can be clearly seen from an examination of the'drawings that under such conditions of operation each piston sucks or draws the fuel mixture through two carburetors simultaneously, thereby increasing the volumetric efficiency of the engine. It should also be noted that because of such an arrangement, the velocity of the fluid in any particular manifold or carburetor remains substantially uniform through the entire engine cycle, since the fuel mixture is drawn through each of two carburetors at every intake stroke of the engine irrespective of the fact to which group of cylinders the fuel drawing piston belongs. Therefore, detrimental intermittency of flow of fluid flowing at a very high velocity is eliminated. Such intermittency occurs in non-communicating manifolds wherein there is no flow of fuel mixture when the fuel drawing piston is one belonging to the opposite group of cylinders. It is also important to note that intermittency of fluid flow under idling operation of the engine is not objectionable, since the'velocity of fluid flow and the density thereof are rather` low.

For any intermediate position of the throttle valves of the carburetors I3 and I4 there will be a corresponding intermediate position of the valve 23. It will now be understood in view of the foregoing that a point at which a given flow of fuel mixture in the manifolds l1 and- I9y becomes effective to move the blades 25 and 26 from the vertical position depends for a given speed of the fuel mixture upon the weights andr areas of said blades. By changing the weights and areas of said blades any desiredY response of the valve 23 to the operative positions of the throttle valves of the carburetor may be effected. One of the ways in which such an adjustment may be attained is drilling a number of holes in the blades 25 and 26, such as holes 25a and 26a provided in the blades 25 and 26.

Although the present invention has been illustrated' and described in connection with an engine having ltwo separate carburetors, it is to be Yunderstood that in certain conditions it may be equally advantageous when embodied in an engine of the multi-throat type.

We claim:

l. In a multi-throat intake manifold internal combustion engine, a conduit operatively connecting the throats of the engine and having a restrictable opening therein, and flow actuated means restricting said opening in inverse proportion to the amount of fuel mixture passing through said throats.

2. Inan internal combustion engine having a plurality ofintake manifolds, a conduit operatively connecting said manifoldsto provide communication therebetween at predetermined times, and flow actuated means for interrupting communication between said manifolds through said conduit when the engine is idling or is operating at light loads.

3. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of intake manifolds, means responsive to the flow of the fuel mixture in said manifolds and operating to establish communication between said manifolds as said flow increases, thereby equalizing the pressures in said manifolds when the engine is operating at high loads and y high speeds.

4. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of intake manifolds, means responsive to the increase of the velocity of flow of the fuel mixture in said manifolds above a predetermined value and operating when so responding to establish a communication between said manifolds, thereby effecting equalization of intake manifold pressures when the engine is operating at high loads and high speeds and ensuring independent .f

operation of said manifolds when the engine is operating at light loads or when the engine is idling.

5'. In an internal combustion engine having two intake manifolds, a conduit connecting said manifolds, a partition in said conduit having an opening, a shaft journalled in said partition and extending into said intake manifolds, a valve on said shaft adapted to close and to open said opening, blades secured tothe ends of said shaft and adapted to be actuated by the fuel mixture flowing in the manifolds .and arranged torotate said shaft when so actuated, said blades being so mounted on the shaft that when they adjust themselves along the direction of the flow said valve is in open position.

6. In an internal combustion engine having two intake manifolds, a conduit connecting said manifolds, a partition secured in said conduit and provided'with openings, a shaft journalled in said partition and extending with its ends into said manifolds, ay disk valve mounted on said shaft and adapted to close and to open said openings as said shaft rotates, two blades secured to the ends of said shaft and adapted to be actuated by the flowing fuel mixture and arranged to rotate said shaft when so actuated, said blades and said valve being so mounted on the shaft with respect to each other that the valve is fully opened'when the blades assume a position substantially parallel to the direction of the flow in said manifolds.

7. In an internal combustion engine having two intake manifolds, a conduit connecting said manifolds, a flanged partition mounted in said conduit and provided with openings, a shaft journalled in said partition and extending with its ends into said manifolds, a disk vlave mounted on said shaft and adapted to close and to open said open` ings as said shaft rotates, two curved blades secured to the ends of said shaft, said blades being adapted to be actuated by the fiowing fuel mixture and arranged to rotate said shaft when so actuated, said blades and said valve being so mounted on the shaft with respect to each other that the valve is fully opened when the blades assume a position substantially parallel to the direction of the flow in said manifolds, and is fully closed when the blades are disposed substantially perpendicularly to said direction of flow.

8. In an internal combustion engine having two intake manifolds, a conduit connecting said manifolds, a partition secured in said conduit and provided with openings, a shaft journalled in said partition and extending with its ends into said manifolds, a disk valve mounted on said shaft and adapted to close and to open said openings as said shaft rotates, two blades secured respectively to the ends of said shaft, said blades being adapted to be actuated by the flowing fuel mixture and arranged to rotate said shaft when so actuated, said blades and said valve being so mounted on the shaft with respect to each other that the valve is fully opened when the blades assume a position substantially parallel to the direction of the flovv in said manifolds, and is fully closed When the blades are disposed substantially perpendicularly to said direction of flow, the area and the Weight of said blades and the rotational resistance of said shaft being so selected that when the engine is operating at light loads the flow of the fuel mixture in the manifolds is insufficient to move said blades to effect any substantial movement of the Valve into an open position.

9. A structure as defined by the preceding claim 8, said blades being apertured to adjust said Weight and areas to effect desired relative positions of said valve at predetermined throttle openings.

SAMUEL E. LYTLE. REVERE H. BERRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4549506 *Apr 16, 1984Oct 29, 1985General Motors CorporationEngine intake system with modulated tuning
US4763612 *Mar 6, 1987Aug 16, 1988Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki KaishaIntake system for internal combustion engine
US4766853 *Mar 6, 1987Aug 30, 1988Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki KaishaIntake passage for multi-cylinder engine
US4898127 *Mar 20, 1989Feb 6, 1990Brunswick CorporationTwo-stroke cycle engine with vacuum pulse balancing system
US7540269 *Mar 30, 2007Jun 2, 2009Mahle International GmbhInduction system with common actuator for plenum and runner valves
DE2450969A1 *Oct 26, 1974Dec 11, 1975Yamaha Motor Co LtdViertakt-verbrennungsmotor
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/184.39, 123/184.59, 123/580
International ClassificationF02M13/02, F02M13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M13/025
European ClassificationF02M13/02D