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Publication numberUS2127111 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1938
Filing dateJun 27, 1934
Priority dateJun 27, 1934
Publication numberUS 2127111 A, US 2127111A, US-A-2127111, US2127111 A, US2127111A
InventorsGaenzle Luther E
Original AssigneeArmstrong Cork Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulated structure
US 2127111 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1938. 1.. E. GAENZLE INSULATED STRUCTURE Filed June 27, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 16, 1938. L. E. GAENZLE INSULATED STRUCTURE Filed June 27, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 16, 1938. E. GAENZLE INSULATED STRUCTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 27, 1934 gl wc/wbom Lml Ag M34 Patented Aug. 16, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INSULATED STRUCTURE Application June 27, 1934, Serial No. 132,669

' 13 Claims.

This invention relates to thermally insulated structures of a type which can be assembled easily, disassembled without injuring any'parts of the structure; and reassembled to form a structure which is as eflicient as the original assembly. A structure of this type should be free from any cement coatings which crack under temperature variations and break in disassembly; the continuity of the insulation material should be maintained for efliciency; the insulation material should be protected from physical injury and the ingress of moisture; assembly and disassembly should be simple; and the finished structure should be. light in weight and present a clean appearance.

In prior constructions, slabs of insulating material were secured in wood frames to form units and these units were assembled to form a structure. The wood frames broke the continuity of the insulation material and the insulating efficiency of the structure was reduced. The in terior surfaces of these units were usually given a plaster coating. This coating frequently cracked under temperature variations and had to be broken if the structure were disassembled.

These coatings allowed moisture laden air to filter into the insulation material where it condensed and further reduced the insulating efiiciency. In constructions where a metal sheathing was provided, the sheathing was nailed to wood blocks and dowels inserted in the insulation material, and adjacent sheets of metal were welded together. Assembly of the latter .structures was diflicult and laborious. The insulation material had to be drilled and blocks (to which the sheathing was nailed) were glued in the holes. Extreme care had to be exercised in welding to avoid charring the insulation material. Furthermore; these structures could not be disassembled without destroying the sheathing and a great deal of the insulation material.

I have overcome the disadvantages of prior constructions by providing a light-weight structure of high insulating efficiency in which the insulation is protected against injury and the ingress of moisture and in which no plaster coats are necessary. My structure is easyto assemble, and can be readily disassembled without injuring any of the material; it presents a sanitary appearance and is easy to clean; and there is no means allowing through conduction of heat between the exterior and the interior of the structure.

My invention relates to insulated structures formed of sheathed panels of thermal insulation material, and I utilize the property of resiliency 66 of the material or materials used in a structure to obtain an effective seal between adjacent or complementary panels. The seal is effected and maintained by compressing the material or materials and utilizing the expansive force or thrust of such compressed material or materials. In a preferred embodiment, the sheathed panels of insulation material are grooved at the portions thereof which lie adjacent or abut contiguous panels to form key Ways or channels therebetween and key strips or splines are positioned in the key ways. The key strips are preferablyv of thermal insulation material of the same general cross-sectional shape but slightly larger than the key ways so that when contiguous panels are drawn together, the key strips or the insulation material, or both, will be compressed. A sealed joint is effected by the expansive force or thrust of the compressed material at the joint, Locking means are provided to lock adjacent panels together and to maintain the key strips in position. When adjacent panels are positioned and before being drawn together, there are perceptible spaces or gaps between the same, so that in drawing such panels together substantial compression of the key strips, or the insulation material, or both, is required to close these spaces.

In the accompanying drawings illustrating a present preferred embodimentof myinven-tion,

Figure l is an isometric view, partly broken away, of a refrigerator cabinet embodying my invention;

Figure 2 is a horizontal sectional view of the cabinet of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an isometric viewof a panel of the type I employ;

Figure 4 is a detail view of a joint between two adjoining panels; 7

Figure 5 is a sectional view to enlarged scale showing details of construction of the door sill and showing the door in closed position;

Figure 6 is a view on the line'VIVI of Figure 1;

and i Figure 7 is a view similar to Figure 4,-showing a modification.

Referring to Figure 1, the structure is made up of panels P which comprise a core of insulation material 2 and metallic sheathing 3. I have shown boththe insulation cores and the key strips as being made of cork. I-prefei' cork be-- cause it is light in weight, has thermal'insulation properties, is resilient and possesses some degree of structural strength. 1 However, other materiv als may be used; and the key strips and panelj cores may be of. different materials if desired.

The cores of insulation material are grooved, as

at 4, at the portions thereof which will lie adjacent or abut contiguous panels when assembled. It'will be noted that a plane surface 5 is preferably allowed between the grooves and the edges of the insulation core. This permits a better joint to be made between adjacent panels because there is a greater contacting surface area.

- The protective sheathing 3 may be any light sheet metal, such as galvanized iron, stainless steel, or enamelled sheet metal. The sheathing is cut out at its edges to provide tabs 6. In forming the panels, the sheathing is bent over the plane surface 5 and the tabs are bent into contact with the inclined surfaces of the grooves.

In erection, key strips or splines l are positioned in the grooves and addacent panels are drawn together. These key strips are preferably of the same cross-sectional shape as the key ways formed by the grooves in adjacent panels. I prefer to have both the insulation cores and the key strips made of resilient material, such as corkboard, so that a tight joint is formed between panels. However, if one material is rigid, a satisfactory joint can be formed if the other material is resilient. It is also possible to use rigid materials for the insulation and the key strips by making the key strips smaller than, or the same size as, the key ways and providing them with a mastic coating which will flow when the panels are drawn together. Angles 8 are provided along the outer edges of the sheathed panels and are correspondingly positioned so that the panels may be drawn and locked together. Screws 9 are inserted in holes in the angles, and the panels are drawn together and locked in position by drawing up the screws. If the angles 8 be objectionable from a decorative standpoint, they may be concealed by covering them with channel irons 1 or the like, and thus a panel effect is imparted to the structure.

In the modification shown in Figure 7, the insulation material 2 extends beyond the sheathing 3 at the edges; and tongues 3| are provided along the edges of the sheathing- In such a construction, the panels are urged together, substantially compressing the insulation material, and locking strips 32 are snapped or slid into engagement with oppositely disposed tongues on adjacent panels. The expansive force, or thrust, of the compressed insulation material maintains the locking strip in position.

The floor panel P1 rests on a re'enforcing frame designated generally at III. This frame extends around the edge of the floor panel, and angle irons ll (Figure 5) extend between frame members to provide support for the central area of the floor panel and to lend rigidity to the frame. Figure 5 showsthe floor section at the door way. The front section of the frameili'has angle irons l2 and I3 secured thereto. The angle iron I2 is tapped as at I4 and a breaker strip I5 is secured to the top of the frame by screws l3 (shown in dotted lines in Figure 5). This breaker stripv prevents through conduction between the outer and inner surfaces of the panels; and is stepped for reception of a, correspondingly stepped door. The inner sheathing of the floor panel is lapped over and secured to the breaker strip at 11 and the outer (and lower), sheathing of the floor panel is bent upward and inset into the breaker strip at It. The remainder of the door Jamb is similar in construction to the floor section. Re-

ferring to Figure 2, the panels P6 and P1 have reenforcing'members l9 adjacent the insulation 1 material. The sheathing isextended about the edges of these members at 20 and is held in place by angle irons 2| which are secured to the members l9v in the same manner that the angle irons l2 and I 3 are secured to the floor frame. Breaker strips 22 are fastened to the angle irons 2|. The door' 23 is of conventional construction and, as shown, comprises a wood frame 24 which supports insulation material. 25. A sheathing 26 is provided on its inner surface and a heavy gauge metal 21 is secured on the outersuriace to the frame 24. This heavy outer metal sheet reenforces the door and prevents it from deforming in use. The dooris secured by hinges 28 to the reenforcing member iii in the panel P6. Gaskets 29 are secured to the door to prevent flow of air between the door and breaker strip when the door is closed.

Referring to Figure 6, when a panel is grooved and no key strip can be used, the groove is filled with a plastic insulating material 30. This seals the joints and fills the space between the angle irons 2|, insuring that there will be no through conduction at these portions. Such construction is advantageously used above the door frame.

In erecting a structure according to myinvention (Figures 1 and 2), the floor panel P1 is put in position on the frame l0 and key strips are placed in the grooves in the upper face of the panel. Panel P: is set in position, a key strip is set in the vertical groove in the face of the panel where it will abut panel P3, and this latter panel is then positioned. The locking means are drawn up between panels P1 and P11, P1 and P3 and between P2 and P3; and a key strip is positioned in the groove in the edge of P3. Panel P4 is then positioned and the locking means are tightened. 'A key strip is set in the vertical groove in P2, and panel P1 is placed and locked in position. Panel P11 is set in place, and panel P8 is put in place, resting on the breaker strip on the top of the door jamb. Panel Pa can then be locked in place. Key strips are vplacedin the vertical grooves in the edges of panels P4 and P6 and the end panel P5 is set and locked in position. The structure is completed by placing key strips in the upper edges of the wall panels and the top or ceiling panel Po is then put in place. When all the panels are locked, the structure is sturdy and the door can be hung.

In the interest of clearer illustration, shelving and supports for ice or mechanical refrigeration units have been omitted. However, I have shown reenforcing angle irons 33 which lend rigidity to the walls.

- Since tight joints between adjacent panels are necessary to have an eflicient structure, I may insert a plastic sealing compound or sealing gasket 34 (Figure 7) between the contacting surfacesof the sheathing of adjacent panels before or after the panels have been .drawn together. I have found that an effective seal is formed by providing the key strip with a coating of asphalt or other sealing material 35 (Figure 4).

I have shown the key strip as being of the same cross-sectional shape as the key way formed by contiguous panels, but they may be of any shape so long as they extend into contact with adjacent panels. It is desirable to have them of the same shape, however, .since there is a greater area of contact between the panels and key strips, and a more effective seal and better insulatedjoint are formed.

may be made up at the factory in standard sizes;

and relatively unskilled labor can be employed in erection. When the units of the structure are erected, the structure is finished. No waterproofing or plaster coats are necessary. This simplicity of erection is a big factor in reducing the cost since a high percentage of the cost of other types of structures is for skilled labor.

I have illustrated and described a present preferred embodiment of my invention. It will be understood, however, that it is not limited to the forms shown, but may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. An insulated structure comprising insulating panels grooved at the portions thereof adapted to contact contiguous panels to define channels therebetween, key strips disposed in said channels, and locking means securing contiguous panels together and sealing the joints therebetween by substantial compression of one of said materials.

2. An insulated structure comprising panels of insulating material grooved at portions thereof to define channels between contiguous panels, key strips of insulating material of a greater crosssectional dimension than said channels disposed therein, and locking means securing contiguous panels together and sealing the joints therebetween by substantial compression of one of said materials.

3. An insulated structure comprising insulating panels grooved at portions thereof to define channels between contiguous panels, key strips of resilient insulating material of a larger crosssectional dimension than said channels disposed therein and locking means holding the key strips in position in a substantially compressed state.

4. An insulated structure comprising panels formed of compressible insulating material having a protective sheathing secured thereto, said panels being grooved at portions thereof to define channels therebetween, compressible key strips disposed in said channels, and locking means engaging the sheathing of contiguous panels and holding said materials and key strips in a substantially compressed state.

5. An insulated structure comprising panels formed of insulating material having a protective sheathing of contiguous panels in abutting relation by substantial compression of the key strip.

7. An insulated structure comprising panels formed of compressible insulating material having a protective sheathing, said panels having grooves in portions thereof to define channels therebetween,key strips of compressible insulating material of a larger cross-sectional dimensionthan said channels disposed therein, and locking means mounted on said sheathing holding contiguous panels in abutting relation by substantial compression'of said materials.

8. An insulated structure comprising panels of insulating material having a protective sheathing, said panels being grooved at portions thereof to form channels therebetween, key strips 01' insulating material of the same cross-sectional shapes as and of a greater cross-sectional dimension than the channels disposed therein, and looking means mounted on said sheathing holding contiguous panels in abutting relation by substantial compression of one of said materials.

9. An insulated structure comprising sheathed panels of compressible insulating material having grooves in portions thereof to form channels therebetween, key strips disposed in said channels, locking means on said sheathing holding adjacent panels together in abutting relation with the said insulating material under substantial compression, and a plastic sealing compound disposed between the abutting portions of contiguous panels.

10. An insulating structure comprising a panel having a core of insulation material, metal sheathing covering one fiat face and a portion only of one of the edges of the core, a similar sheathing covering the other fiat face and covering said edge of the core over only a portion thereof spaced from the said edge portion covered by the first mentioned sheathing, a sheathed panel lying in contiguous relationship with respect to said edge of the first mentioned panel and having the edges of its sheathings disposed in spaced relationship, the arrangement being such that insulation material in the zone of the joint between contiguous panels is in substantially compressed condition, and looking means holding the abutting panelstogether against the tendency of the substantially compressed insulation material to expand, whereby the joint between the abutting panels is effectively sealed and through conduction avoided.

11. An insulating structure comprising a panel having a core of insulation material, sheathings covering the flat faces of the core in spaced relationship, a sheathed panel lying in contiguous relationship with respect to an edge of the first mentioned panel and having its sheathings disposed in spaced relationship, the arrangement being such that insulation material in the zone of the joint between contiguous panels is in substantially compressed condition, and locking means holding the abutting panels together against the tendency of the substantially compressed insulation material to expand, whereby the joint between abutting panels is effectively sealed and through conduction avoided.

12. An insulated structure comprising panels each having a core of insulation material with sheathings covering the flat faces thereof in spaced relationship, there being grooves formed in the contiguous edges of theinsulation coresof adjacent panels, a nonconducting key strip disposed in the channel defined by contiguous grooves, the arrangement being such that the key strips are under substantial compression, and locking means holding the abutting panels together against the tendency of the substantially compressed insulation material to expand, whereby the joint between abutting panels is effectively sealed and through conduction avoided.

13. An insulating structure comprising a panel having a core of resilient insulation material, sheathings covering the flat surfaces of the core in spaced relationship, said insulation material normally extending beyond the sheathing when in theuncompressed state, a sheathed panel lying in contiguous relationship with resepect to the first mentioned panel and having its sheathings disposed in .spaced relationship, the arrangement being such that the insulation material in the zone of the joint between contiguous panels is in substantially compressed condition, and locking means holding the abutting panels together against the tendency of the substantially com- ,pressed insulation material to expand, whereby LUTHER E. GAENZLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2476501 *Jan 24, 1945Jul 19, 1949Pietro ManiscalcoPrefabricated refrigerator housing
US3142069 *Dec 4, 1962Jul 28, 1964Trojan Pools IncConstruction members for swimming pools
US3230681 *Jul 12, 1961Jan 25, 1966Dow Chemical CoSpline joint for expanded thermoplastic panels
US4754369 *Jun 6, 1986Jun 28, 1988Telefonaktiebolaget L M EricssonCabinet of a particularly light and stiff construction
US4917256 *Jul 12, 1988Apr 17, 1990Whirlpool CorporationInterlocking and sealing arrangement for modular domestic appliances
US6298619Mar 2, 2000Oct 9, 2001William D. DavieModular building frame system
US6792722 *Oct 10, 2002Sep 21, 2004Erkut BeserCasing for cold bridge-free air handling unit
US7530204 *Oct 28, 2002May 12, 2009CelestiaClimate controlled housing unit
US7849644 *May 16, 2006Dec 14, 2010Melesky James BSystem for insulating attic openings
US7926229Apr 27, 2010Apr 19, 2011Melesky James BSystem for insulating attic openings
US8413393Dec 9, 2009Apr 9, 2013James B. MeleskyInsulation cover for attic closures
US8661750Jul 26, 2011Mar 4, 2014James B. MeleskySystems and methods for insulating attic openings
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/404.4, 312/138.1, 220/693, 52/578, 220/592.2, 312/257.1, 52/393
International ClassificationE04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/76
European ClassificationE04B1/76