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Publication numberUS2127132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1938
Filing dateAug 17, 1936
Priority dateAug 17, 1936
Publication numberUS 2127132 A, US 2127132A, US-A-2127132, US2127132 A, US2127132A
InventorsMonroe Edward R
Original AssigneeOsteo Vitalizer Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Osteopathic machine
US 2127132 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1938.

E. R. MONROE OSTEOfATHIC MACHINE Filed Aug.- 1'7} 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet l l RW J INVENTOR.

5 Ward Aug. 16,1938. E, ONR 4 2,127,132

OTEOPATHIC MACHINE Filed Aug. 17, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 lllllllllllfillllIlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIll III A 5 mumlnufiimlnunnuuH WIIIIII I'll" INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY.

Patented Aug. 16, 1938 UNITED STATES- PATENT OFFICE OSTEOPATHIC MACHINE Application August 17, 1936, Serial No. 96,379

7 Claims.

This invention relates to osetopathic machines and more especially to a power driven machine designed to be'placed in a practitioners office for the treatment of patients in general.

One of the prime objects of the invention is to design an osteopathic machine, provided with spaced apart, kneading rolls or knuckles, so arranged that the patient is treated when seated in the chair on which the apparatus is mounted.

Another object is to design an osteopathic apparatus, the chair frame of which is slightly resilient, so that contact of the kneading knuckles, rolls, or wings, will be cushioned either by the flexibility of the frame and/or by a slight rolling movement of the patients body.

A further object is to provide a very simple, practical and economical apparatus which can be readily manufactured and assembled, which comprises but few parts, all of substantial construction, and which is so designed thatthe kneading mechanism can-be easily and quickly removed and/ or replaced.

A still further object is to design an apparatus which is of neat and pleasing appearance, which is efficient in operation and which thoroughly massages and/or kneads the neck and back of the patient.

With the above and other objects in view, the present invention consists in the combination and arrangement of parts, hereinafter more fully described, illustrated in the accompanying 'drawings, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that changes may be made in the form, size, proportion and minor details of construction, without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational View of my osteopathic apparatus.

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view.

Fig. 3 is a detail plan showing the upper bearing assembly.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the gear case.

Fig. 5 is a top plan view with the cover removed.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary front view of the kneading rolls.

Fig. 7 is a top plan View thereof.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary View showing a roll having a spiral rib.

Fig. 9 is a top plan view thereof.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view showing an alternate roll construction, the knobs or projections serving as knuckles.

Fig. 11 is also an alternate View of a roll with special wings for massaging the neck.

Referring now particularly to the drawings in which I have shown one embodiment of my invention, the numeral l5 indicates the frame of the chair, this is preferably formed of tubing and is provided with arms 16 as usual, and the tubing is so formed that no rear legs are re quired, thus providing for a certain degree of resiliency when a person is seated in the chair, a seat I! being hung in said frame in any desired manner.

The osteopathic apparatus proper includes a gear case l8 which is secured to the under side of the seatpby means of bolts I9, this gear box being formed as clearly shown in Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawings, and a cover plate 20 forms a closure for the upper end so that grease or other lubricantis retained therein.

Spaced apart, vertically disposed shafts 2| and 22 respectively are journaled in this case and a worm wheel 23 is mounted on the shaft 2|, said Worm wheel meshing with and being driven by a worm 24 which is mounted on the horizontally disposed shaft 25, this shaft being in turn journaled in suitable bearings 26 provided in the case. A sheave 2! is also mounted on the shaft 25, and a belt 28 serves to gear said sheave to a similar sheave 29 which is provided on the motor 30, said motor being connected to any suitable source of electrical power. Gears A and B are provided on the shafts 2| and 22 so that the shafts are simultaneously driven and identically similar sockets 3| and set screws 32 are provided as shown and for a purpose to be presently described.

The kneading rolls 33 and 34 respectively are formed as clearly shown in Figs. 6 and 7 of the drawings, each roll being hollow and identically similar, shafts 35 extend therethrough, the ends of the shafts being slotted as at 35 to engage the set screws 32 so that the kneading rolls may be properly set with relation to each other,

, discs 3'! forming a closure for the ends of the rolls, the upper ends of said shafts projecting slightly beyond the discs and are journaled in a bearing plate 38 as shown, the lower ends of these shafts being mounted in the sockets 3| and the set screws 32 serve to rigidly secure them in position, and permitting quick and easy removal when desired for changing rolls, repairs, or for any other purpose.

Raised kneading ribs 39 are provided on each roll, and engage the patents back on opposite sides of the spinal column as the apparatus is driven, and these ribs can be of any desired shape and/or design. In Figs. 8 and 9 I have shown a spirally formed rib 40 which I find operates in a very satisfactory manner, and in Fig. 10 I have shown rounded projections or knobs 4I' which are similar to a mans knuckles, and in Fig. 11 I have shown projections 42 which are designed to engage and massage the patients neck when treatment is being given, these projections 42, projecting beyond the face of the ribs formed on the remainder of the rolls, and this is due to the fact that the spinal column is slightly curved at the point where there would be contact with the patients neck, and consequently, the projections must extend further in order to engage.

A vertically disposed rod 43 projects from the gear case to the bearing plate 38 and serves to reinforce the roll assembly and prevent its turning, said rod being Welded or otherwise secured to the back frame member 42 which forms a part of the chair, the upper end of the rod 43 being turned as at 44 and is inserted in the rod 43 so that a quickly detachable connection is provided, a set screw 44a holding it in position.

A control switch (not shown) is provided on one of the arms of the chair and in close proximity to the patients hands so that the motor is easily controlled by the patient in the chair.

In practise, the patient dressed only in light undergarment, sits in the chair with his or her back directly against the kneading rolls 33 and 34, the motor is then energized, the rolls are then driven so that the ribs 39 contact with the back on either side of the spinal column, the action being such that the rub or pressure is away from the spinal column, these ribs are smoothly rounded and the resiliency of the chair frame provides for a smooth, even kneading action, which forces the blood to the various organs of the body.

The kneading can be as strenuous as desired and is controlled by the patient who exerts as much pressure as desired against the rolls.

The guard (not shown) is provided around the kneading rolls to eliminate the danger of injury to hands or fingers or the catching of clothing when the apparatus is in operation.

From the foregoing description it will be obvious that I have perfected a very simple, practical and economical osteopathic machine for treating use by osteopaths and physicians in general.

What I claim is:

1. In a machine of the character described and comprising a chair including a seat, centrally disposed, vertical, detachable kneading rolls mounted on and forming the back of the chair said rolls extending from the seat to the top of the machine and engaging the back of the person being treated, and means for driving said rolls.

2. In an osteopathic machine of the character described comprising a chair, having a seat a pair of vertical, spaced apart, kneading rolls directly adjacent the back of the seat and extending from the seat to the top of the machine, said rolls forming the back of said chair, projections formed on said rolls, and means mounted on said seat for driving said kneading rolls.

3. In an osteopathic machine of the character described comprising a chair including a seat, a pair of centrally disposed, vertical, kneading rolls mounted on said chair and extending from the seat to the top of the machine, said rolls being formed with projecting ribs extending the entire length of the rolls and adapted to knead a patients back, means for driving said rolls, and means for detaching said rolls.

4. An osteopathic apparatus of the character described and comprising a chair having a resiliently mounted back frame and seat, a pair of centrally disposed, vertical, kneading rolls mounted on said seat and in position to engage the back of the patient, said rolls extending from the seat to the upper end of the machine, means projecting from the face of said rolls for kneading the patients back, and means for driving said rolls.

5. An osteopathic machine of the character described and including a chair having a resiliently mounted back and seat frame, a pair of vertically disposed, kneading rolls mounted thereon in the center of the back frame and in spaced apart relation said rolls extending from the seat to the upper end of the machine for engaging a patients back on either side of the spinal column, projections on the face of said rolls, and means for driving said rolls.

6. An osteopathic machine of the character described and including a chair having a resiliently mounted back and seat frame, a pair of vertically disposed, kneading rolls mounted thereon and in position to engage a patients back on either side of the spinal column, a gear box mounted on the chair seat frame and in which the lower ends of the shafts are journaled, gears on said shafts, and driving means connected to said shafts for acuating said driving rolls.

7. An osteopathic machine of the class described and including a chair having a resiliently mounted back and seat frame, a vertically disposed, kneading assembly mounted on the seat frame and adapted to engage a patients back on either side of the spinal column, a gear box, gears mounted therein and connecting the rolls in driving relation, means for detaching said rolls, and a motor mounted on the seat frame for driving said roll assembly.

EDWARD R. MONROE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3570478 *Oct 10, 1968Mar 16, 1971Schneider Lester LFoot massager apparatus
US4170989 *Nov 21, 1977Oct 16, 1979Herbert GeartnerMassaging apparatus
US4202326 *Aug 1, 1978May 13, 1980Gerpen Gary W VanMuscle manipulating apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/115, 601/133
International ClassificationA61H15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H15/00
European ClassificationA61H15/00