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Publication numberUS2127296 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1938
Filing dateNov 9, 1937
Priority dateNov 9, 1937
Publication numberUS 2127296 A, US 2127296A, US-A-2127296, US2127296 A, US2127296A
InventorsHolmes Lawrence A
Original AssigneeHolmes Lawrence A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sample box
US 2127296 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 M s 1 u 4 o H W e W 2 9 2 M Q Q m w 9 k e 7 L 3 0 0 9A In- 5 6 W 16 2a Z 9 a0 7 M A z w o o m v 1 a W ofl L w M Aug. 16, 1938. L. A. HOLMES SAMPLE BOX Filed Noiv. 9, 1937 Patented Aug. 16, 1938 UNITED STATES PTENT OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates generally to the sampling of liquids and more particularly to the sampling of crude petroleum prior to shipping.

As is well known the production of petroleum 5' from different wells varies greatly, both in quantity and quality, the latter depending on its degree of water content, emulsion condition, and foreign matter present. The oil from several wells is ordinarily piped to shipping tanks of large ca- 10'* pacity, each provided with a series of sample pipes arranged vertically so that samples may be taken at spaced vertical levels in the tank and mixed in an attempt to arrive at a true sample of the contents of the tank.

5" These samples are ordinarily taken by opening valves in the sampling pipes and allowing the crude petroleum to run into a receptacle of sulficient size to obtain a desired sample. sample is tested the oil is usually dumped on the ground, as there is no means provided for returning the oil to the tank. As such samples are frequently taken, the present practice not only involves loss of oil, but the accumulated oil on the ground produces a dangerous fire hazard, as well as a sloppy and undesirable region on the ground for the workers.

A further disadvantage of the present system is that in rainy weather, rain gets into the sample, either directlyor by accumulation on the sampling pipes forming streams which discharge into the sample with the oil. This is particularly objectionable, as the oil is bought by the pipe line companies and other purchasing companies on a graduated scale, according to the quality of the oil and the water content thereof.

In view of the disadvantages of the present practice of sampling oil tanks, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a safe protected means for obtaining samples of petroleum stored in. tanks whereby samples may be obtained without danger of pollution by rainfall and whereby the oil may be returned to the shipping tank without any loss after sufficient oil has been shipped from the tank to reduce the level therein below thebottom of the sample box.

Specifically it is an object of this invention to provide a sample box into which sample pipes may be run and to which may be provided means for conducting the oil dumped into the sample box back to the shipping tank.

It is sometimes necessary to drain the sample pipes before taking the sample in order to get a true sample of the oil from the diiferent levels of the tank. In the case of tall tanks, the pipes contain a large quantity of oil and this would After the ordinarily be allowed to flow onto the ground to waste, creating a fire hazard and a sloppy condition. In View of this, it is a further object of this invention to provide a sample box of sufficient size to act as a receptacle for such oil as may be 5 run from the pipes prior to taking the sample, so that the oil may subsequently be returned to the tank.

These and other objects will be apparent from the drawing and the following description thereof. Referring to the drawing which is for illustrative purposes only,

Fig. 1 is an elevation of a petroleum shipping tank showing a sample box mounted thereon. In this view the sample box and the pipes leading to it are shown slightly larger thanin correct proportion to the tank. i

Fig. 2 is a frontelevation of the sample box which has been partly broken away to show a.

part thereof in section. 20"

Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation taken on line 37-3 of Fig. 2, but showing the door of the box inthe open position.

More particularly describing the invention, reference numeral It indicates a shipping tank such as is commonly used, for the storagev of petroleum prior to shipment. For .the purpose of taking samples from various levels, the tank is. provided with the customary sample pipes l2, l3. and I l (although any number mightbe provided) which are in communication with theinterior of the tank at the points IE, it and I! respectively, These pipes are provided with suitable manually operable valves. i8, 59 and 2d.

Mounted on the tank is a sample box 22 into which the lower ends, or discharge ends, of the pipes l2, l3 and M are positioned. Referring to Figs. 2 and 3 for details in the construction of the sample box, the box comprises a housing 2,3 made of sheet metal or other suitable material. The housing may be attached to the shipping tank in any suitable manner such as by means of brackets 24 which are riveted or otherwise secured to the tank and to the back of the box. The box is provided with a downwardly opening door 25 which is hinged at 26 and is provided with a spring catch 21. By means of this door access is gained to the interior of the box. The hinges 26 of the door 25 have a limited swing so that when the door is open it will not fall below the position shown in Fig. 3. In this position it serves as a small writing table for the convenience of the man taking the sample. If the writing table feature is not desired the door might be made to open in some other manner.

Interiorly of the box there is provided a perforated plate 28 which serves as a shelf upon which the containers for taking samples may be placed, as indicated by broken lines at 29 in Fig. 3. A heavy screen might be used in place of the perforated plate, or an open framework of any desired construction.

At the upper end of the box the housing 23 is provided with openings 3|] for the reception of the pipes I2, l3 and I4. These pipes are welded at I2, I 3 and H to prevent ingress of water, however the pipes might be sealed in some other manner in the top of the box.

For the purpose of returning oil that may accumulate in the bottom of the sample box, a conduit, generally indicated by reference numeral 32, is provided which connects the bottom of the sample box with the interior of the shipping tank. This conduit is provided with a check valve 33 which prevents liquid from the shipping tank from flowing into the sample box. The conduit is also provided with a manually operable valve 34. The conduit enters the lower end of the sample box by means of the threaded opening 35 and is attached to the shipping tank by means of fitting 36.

In the operation of the device the person wishing to take a sample opens the door 25 of the box, the inner surface of the door then forming a writing table. The workman then places his sample can on the shelf 28 and underneath one of the pipes I2, I3 or M. The sample may be taken by opening the valve in the sample pipe under which the sample can is placed. If desirable the sample pipes may be drained into the box before taking the sample. Samples may be taken from any of the three points of the tank or from all three. Any surplus or overflow of the oil will flow to the bottom of the sample box through the perforations in the shelf. After the sample has been tested the oil may be emptied onto the shelf and allowed to flow into the bottom of the sample box. When the tank is emptied to below the level of the bottom of the box, the oil in the bottom of the sample box may be returned to the shipping tank by opening valve 34. In the event this valve is inadvertently left open during the filling of the tank, or when the tank is full, check valve 33 prevents any oil from flowing from the shipping tank into the sample box and overflowing therefrom onto the ground.

It should be apparent from this description that the sample box provides a weather proofed enclosure for the discharge ends of the sample pipes, so that the samples may be taken during rainy weather without danger of any of the rain getting into the sample. It should also be apparent that means is provided for preventing oil from flowing onto the ground by providing a container adapted to catch any overflow of the sample can and by providing a container into which the oil sample may be emptied or the sample pipes drained. It should also be apparent that means is provided for returning oil which accumulates in the sample box back to the shipping tank.

I claim as my invention:

1. The combination of: a petroleum storage tank; a sample pipe having its intake end communicating with the interior of said tank; a sample box mounted on the side of said tank and enclosing the discharge end of said pipe; a valve in said pipe; conduit means connecting the lower portion of said sample box with the interior of said tank; a valve in said conduit means.

2. The combination of: a petroleum storage tank; sample pipes having their intake ends communicating with the interior of said tank at spaced elevations; a valve in each pipe; a sample box enclosing the discharge ends of said pipes; conduit means connecting the lower interior portion of said sample box with the interior of said tank; a check valve in said conduit means for preventing flow of petroleum from said tank to said box; and a manually operable valve in said conduit means.

3. For use in combination with an oil storage tank and sample pipes associated therewith, a sampling means comprising: a housing means enclosing the discharge ends of said sample pipes; a door in the front of said housing means; a shelf in said housing below the discharge ends of said pipes; and conduit means connecting the lower portion of said housing with the interior of said tank.

4. For use in combination with an oil storage tank and sample pipes associated therewith, a sampling means comprising: housing means enclosing the discharge ends of the sample pipes, said housing means having an opening in the front thereof; a downwardly opening door hingedly mounted for limited movement in the front of said housing means for closing said opening, said door being adapted to act as a writing table when opened; a horizontally disposed shelf in said housing below said sample pipes and below the opening in said housing closable by said door; and conduit means connecting the lower end of said housing with the interior of said tank, said conduit means including a check valve adapted to prevent flow of liquid from said tank to said housing means.

5. The combination of: a storage tank; a sample pipe having its intake end communicating with the interior of said tank; a valve in said pipe; a sample box mounted on the side of said tank and enclosing the discharge end of said pipe; conduit means connecting the lower interior portion of said box with said tank; and a check valve in said conduit means for preventing How of liquid from said tank to said box.

LAWRENCE A. HOLMES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534181 *Dec 22, 1947Dec 12, 1950James Roberts NobleFluid sampling apparatus
US4989463 *Mar 2, 1990Feb 5, 1991Kerr-Mcgee Chemical CorporationSample collection shield
US5189919 *Apr 29, 1991Mar 2, 1993Atlantic Richfield CompanyWellhead fluid sampler
US5691488 *Jun 5, 1996Nov 25, 1997Mmc International Corp.Portable sampling apparatus and system
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.71, 220/315, 222/110, 73/863.86, 222/478, 222/111
International ClassificationG01N1/20
Cooperative ClassificationG01N1/2035
European ClassificationG01N1/20B