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Publication numberUS2128132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1938
Filing dateOct 12, 1932
Priority dateOct 12, 1932
Publication numberUS 2128132 A, US 2128132A, US-A-2128132, US2128132 A, US2128132A
InventorsFrederick Louis T
Original AssigneeContinental Diamond Fibre Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Socket
US 2128132 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 23, 1938. L. T. FREDERICK 2,128,132

SOCKET y Filed Oct. 12, 1932 2 Sheetsj-Sheet l L. T. FREDERICK Aug. 23, 1938./

SOCKET Filed oct. 1*'2, 1952 2 sheets-sheet 2 o@ @Q QW, o Q@ O0 Q@ 'Patented Aug. 2 3, 1938 SOCKET Louis 'I'. Frederick, Valparaiso, Ind., assignor Lto Continental-Diamond Fibre Company, Newark, Del., a corporation of Delaware Animation october' 12, 1932, serial No. 631.504

e claims. (01. 17a- 32m This invention relates to socket devices, and.

particularly to sockets for vacuum tubes which are adapted" to receive the cylindrical contact prongs of vacuum tubes.

The principal object of the invention is to provide an improved socket of simple construction which may be manufactured at low cost and which embodies novel structural features that greatly enhance the performance of its intended function.

Broadly, the invention contemplates the provision in a' socket of a contact element comprising a tubular barrel or eyelet portion and a terminal lug extending therefrom, the barrel portion being adapted to receive, engage and wipe an inserted.` contact prong and the terminal lug affording a means of electrical connection to the socket-element. A'plurality of such socket elements are threaded into a mounting plate which is secured to the underside of the base plate.

These generally stated features, as well as others, will be more fully described hereinafter, reference being now had to the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an inverted assembled socket utilizing a `preferred form of contact element;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the socket taken along a diametric line passing through the center of one of the contact elements;

Fig. 3 is a detail plan view of an alternative construction;

Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view along line l-l of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a face view of the stamped sheet metal blank from which'a socket element is formed;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the formed socket element;

Fig. 7 is a perspective View oi a modified form of socket element;

Fig. 8 is a plan View of the socket element of Fig. '1;

Fig. 9 is a partial sectional view of an inverted assembled socket using a still further modication of the socket element, the View being taken along the line passing through the center of the contact element;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view' of this form of contact element;

Fig. 11 is a perspective( view of a modified form of the mounting plate which is used in the embodiment of Figs. 9 and 10;

Figs. 12 and 13 are face views of portions of a metal strip or sheet during the formation of contact elements of the preferred form;

Figs. 14 and'1`5 are side views of the portions; and

Fig. 16 is-a sectional view along line lil-I6 o! Fig. 13.

Referring particularly to Figs 1 and 2 of the drawings, there is shown a `socket comprising a base plate i having mounting ears 2, a mounting plate 3; and contact elements 4, this devicebee"Y ing adapted for use with a iive-prongvacuum tube, although, it will beundersood thatthe invention is applicable to any device regardless of the number of contact elements used. Mounting plate 3 is provided with a plurality of circularly arranged apertures 6 through which the contact elements 4 are threaded. Base plate I is provided with similar apertures 5a aligned with apertures 5. and adapted to receive the prongs of a tube. The mounting plate is also provided with a central aperture 6 which aligns with a central aperture I in the base plate I, these aligning apertures being adapted to receive an attaching rivet 8 or the like.

The contact elements 4 are of similar construction and each is formed from a sheet metal stamping or blank, such as is shown clearly in Fig. 5. After'the formation or the blank, the

contactelement is formed by bending or pressing the blank to form the iinished article illustrated clearly in Fig. 6. When thus formed, the

contact element comprises a frusto-conical barrel portion which preferably, though not necessarily,

has longitudinal slits I0 therein. It will be noted that the blank of Flgp, from which the element is formed, is substantially T-shaped and the head of this blank'is rounded or circularly bent to form the i'rusto-conical barrel portion.

'Ihe contact element also comprises a terminal lug il which extends laterally from one end of the barrel portion and is bent as clearly illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 6. The terminal lug may have formed thereon a knob-like projection I2, the purpose of which will appear more clearly hereinafter. The angularly extending end of the terminal lug is provided with suitable apertures i3 for the attachment of an electrical coinductor. It will be noted from Fig. 6 that the large end or base of the frusto-conical barrel portion is flanged as at Il. This large end of the barrel portion is of such diameter that it will freely receive a contact prong of a vacuum tube, while the small end of the barrel portion is of such diameter that it will not freely receive the prong. When the prong is inserted into the barrel portion thro'ugh the large end thereof, it engages and is wiped by the wall of the barrel portion at the with slit-like apertures 5c.

, are threaded through openings 5 and 5c, as clearcontact element in place.

small end thereof. This results in a spreading of the small end of the barrel and gives very good electrical contact between the prong and the contact element, especially since the element is formed of spring metal. A

After the contact elements have been formed in the manner above described, they are threaded 'illustrated clearly in Fig. 2. When the contact elements are threaded through the mounting plate, the spring-like terminal lug allows the projecting knob I2 to snap over the mounting plate so as to securely hold each contact element `in place. The flange Il of each contact element seats against and engages the mounting plate about the aperture thereof so as to also hold the I havefound that the projecting knob I2 is not necessary because the spring-like terminal lug frictionally engages the edge of tnemounting plate to securely lock the contact element in pace. The projecting knob is, therefore, an optional feature.

After the contact elements have been assemble on the mounting plate, the plate is attached to the base plate I by gmeans of rivet 8 above mentioned. A finder ring or plate I5 may be provided to facilitate insertion of the tube prongs In the socket. This ring has apertured mounting ears which align withthe ears 2 of the base'plate and permit its attachment to the base plate. The centrally located aperture I6 of the finder ring is of such diameter that it circumscribes the openings in the base plate through which the tube prongs are inserted. y

An alternative construction is shown in Figs. 3 and 4, wherein the mounting plate 3a is of the same shape as the base plate I and is provided The socket elements ly illustrated. The lug I I of each socket element is tapered at 28 and the tapered portion thereof seats snugly in the recess 30 of aperture 5c. The lug is tensioned toward the center of thev socket element. When the element is threaded into the mounting plate apertures, the lug I I passes freely .through'the wide portion of aperture 5c and the tapered portion of the lugyenters the recess 30, as above noted, to immobilize the element. Projections I2 are omitted. Instead of the finder ring I5 there is provided a plate or `button I5a which is circumscribed by theopenings 5 a in plate I. This button serves the same purpose as the finderring, viz. to guide the tube prongs into the socket. The central rivet holds the plates together.

The sockets illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 are of simple construction and may be 4manufactured commercially at low cost. The socket elements may be formed in a few simple operations and, byvirtue of their integral formation, are strong and durable. The specific construction of these elements and the manner in which they are assembled and attached to the base plate are important features which mutually contribute toward an inexpensive but highly satisfactory article.

The preferred form of the socket element illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 and described in detail above lends itself to economic commercial manufacture and may bemade in the manner illustrated in-Figs. 12 to 16. Referring specifically to Figs.

12 and 13, there is shown a strip or sheet I1 of spring metal which is intended to be a continuous strip from which successive socket elements ar,e formed in successive steps. Figs. 12 and 1 3, when considered together, illustrate a length pf strip I'I showing the various stages of formation of the socket elements. It is intended then that Fig. 13 be considered as placed at the right hand side of Fig. 12 and that the strip portions illustrated be integral. Figs. 14 and 15 are similar side views of the strip portions and are likewise to be considered as constituting a continuous strip.

Beginning at the left side of the illustration of formation of a socket element is to punch the holes I 3 in strip I1. The next step is the stamping out of the blank which has already been described in connection with Fig. 5. It will be noted that the blanks are substantially completely stamped from strip I1, there being only a small portion I 8 left integral with the strip. Slits II) are now cut in the blanks. The side wing-like portions I9 of the blank are now bent away from strip I1, as indicated more clearly in Fig. 14. The extending edges of the wing-like portions are now brought together as indicated clearly at 20 and the preformed barrel portion is bent at right angles to the strip. The ilangev the socket element being raised outof the plane' of strip Il, as illustrated clearly at22 (see Fig.

16). The completely formed sock/et element is now severed or broken away from strip I1 and is readyfor use.

It is important to note that the substantially T-shaped blank, which is used to form the socket element, may be formed with very little waste from a continuous strip, as illustrated. By

I stamping the successive blanks from the strip in dovetailed or interdentate fashion, as clearly illustrated, substantially all of the materialof the strip is utilized, there being only a small amount of scrap. This is a very important feature of vthe device which greatly enhances its commercial value in practice. While the successive operations, which are performed upon the continuous strip as illustrated and above described,l may be carried out by hand-operated devices, in actual practice, it is preferable to provide a single machine having automatically operable parts that are adapted to successively perform the necessary operations. By having the parts of the machine arranged to operate in succession at pre determined time intervals, and feeding the strip into the machine at a'proper rate or speed. a large number of socket elements may be formed per unit time at little cost. Such machines as that mentioned are old in various arts and are commonly used in mass" production. For the purpose of the present invention, it is unnecessary to mention further the particular machine which would be used. l It mightl be well to state, however, that the illustrations of Figs. 12 to 16 have been taken fromA an actual sample produced by a machine of the type mentioned which has been put into operation.

- Referring now to Figs. 7 and 8, there is dis-v closed a modified form of contact element which Fig. 12, it will be noted that the rst step in the is generally similar to the form above describedand is adapted for use in the same general manner. In this instance, however, the tubular barrel portion 9a ls substantially cylindrical in shape and is provided-with inwardly pressed portions 23 which are adapted to firmly engage and wipe ,the tube prong .as it passes through the barrel portion. The prong-engaging portions 23 are preferably formed by striking-out spaced longitudinal strips and pressing these strips inward. In this modification, the barrel portion is provided with interlocking, interdentate edges 2l and 25. While a dovetail construction of these edges is illustrated, any other suitable construction giving the desired interlocking coaction may be utilized. Aside from these differences, the contact element is identical with that above described. In constructing this form of contact element, a metallic stamping or blank is formed and the element is formed by bending or pressing the blank to the form clearly illustrated in Fig. 7. This form of element may be made in the same manner as is the preferred form.

In Figs. 9 to 11, there is illustrated a further modification, in which the contact element takes the same general form, having a barrel portion 9b and a terminal lug IIb. The barrel portion is drawn from a blank so as. to provide the body thereof and the flanged end I4b. The body is pressed into polygonal cross section over a portion of its length, it being formed triangularly in the illustration of Figs. 10 and 11. It will be understood, however, that any polygonal-shape` may be imparted to thev barrel portion. In the formation of the barrel portion, longitudinal slits 26 are provided and arranged so ,that they are located in the sides of the polygonal structure. The purpose of this construction is also to obtain good electrical contact between the tube prong and the contact element.

It is preferred that this form of socket device be used with a mounting plate such as is illustrated in Fig. 11. This plate 3b is provided with a'plurality of circularly arranged aperturesV 5b having radially disposed recess portions 21. The purpose of these recesses i's to cooperate with a detent 28 struck-out and turned up from the horizontal portion of terminal lug IIb. When the socketl element is completely formed, as illustrated and above described, it will be threaded through one of openings 5b with the terminal lug 'extending radially outward and with detent 28 extending into recess 21 as illustrated in Fig. 9. Although this construction is preferred, it will be understood that the socket element may be used with any other desired locking means such, for example, as provided in the preferred embodiment.

It will be noted that the eyelet portion of this form of socket device is seamless and, as stated above, the element is formed by drawing the barrel portion from the blank. Obviously, this form of device may be made in large quantities commercially in the same general manner as illustrated and described above in connection with the preferred form.

Although the invention has been disclosed herein with reference to certain specific embodiments and a preferred method of making the various devices, it will be apparent that changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. In a socket, a mounting plate having a pair of openings therein, one of said openings being slit-like and having a recess, and a contact element comprising a tubular prong-receiving barrel portion and a tapered terminal lug extending therefrom, said barrel portion extending through the other of said openings, said lug extending through said slit-like opening and being adapted to pass freely therethrough but tensioned so that its tapered portion seats snugly insaid re-v cess to immobilize said element. l

2. In a socket, a mounting plate having a pair of openings therein, one of said openings being slit-like and having a recess, and a contact element comprising a prong-engaging portion and a tapered terminal lug extending therefromsaid prong-engaging portion extending through the other of said openings, said lug extending through said one opening with its tapered portion seated in said recess.

3. An electrical socket receptacle for a vacuum tube having a'terminal prong, comprising a pair of thin superposed apertured insulating plates with an aperture of one plate in alignment with an aperture of the other plate to receive said prong, a metallic contact'member composed of a single piece of thin resilient metal and comprising a flat anchoring part disposed between said plates and an angularly divergent contact part extending from said anchoring part through one of the apertures and aligned with the said apertures to receive said prong, said contact part comprising a portion formed as an angularly divergent prolongation of said yanchoring part and a pair of wings or arms extending from said portion in a direction parallel to said plates and directed toward each other about an axis perpendicular to said plates, the said wings forming with said portion a channel generally conformable to the contour of said prong and aligned axially with said apertures to receive and resiliently grip said prong'when it is inserted through said apertures, said prong-receiving channel having inherent expansibility and contractibility by virtue of lthe resilience of said wings and adapted to engage the inserted prong along a plurality of longitudinal lines of contact extending substantially the length of said channel, whereby good electrical contact with said prong and secure holding of the prong are maintained.

4. An electrical socket receptacle for a vacuum tube having a terminal prong, comprising a pair of thin superposed apertured insulating plates with an aperture of one plate in alignment with an aperture of the other plate to receive said prong, a metallic contact member composed of a single piece of thin resilient metal and comprising a fiat anchoring part gripped between said plates and an angularly divergent contact vpart extending from said anchoring part through one of the apertures and aligned with the said apertures to receive said prong, said plates being separated only by the trickness of said fiat anchoring part and engaging the opposed flat surfaces of said anchoring part throughout the areas of said surfaces, said contact part com.- pri'sing a portion formed as an angularly divergent ,prolongation of said anchoring part and a pair of wings or arms extending from said portion in a direction parallel to said plates and directed. toward each other about an axis perpendicular to said plates, the said wings forming with said portion a channel generally conformable to the contour of said prong and aligned axially with said apertures to receive and resiliently grip said prong when it is inserted through said apertures, said prong-receiving channel havsaid vplates at the supported end of said channel for supporting said contact part at points spaced i'rom said gripping'part.

'5. Anfelectrical socket receptacle for a vacuum tubey having a terminal prong, comprising a pair of thin superposed apertured insulating plates with an aperture of one plate in alignment ,with an aperture of the other plate to receive'said prong, a metallic contact member composed of a single piece ofthin resilient metal and comprising a ilat anchoring part gripped between said plates and an angularly divergent contact part extending from said anchoring part through one of the apertures and aligned with the said apertures to receive said prong, said plates being separated only by the thickness of said nat anchoring part and engagingthe opposed iiat surfaces of said anchoring part throughout the areas of said surfaces, said contact part comprising a portion formed as an angularly divergent prolongation of said anchoring part and a pair of wings or arms extending from said portion in `a direction parallel `to said plates and directed toward each other about an axis perpendicular to said plates, the said wings forming with said portion a channel generally conformable to the contourof said prong and aligned axially. with said apertures to receive and resiliently grip said prong when it is inserted through said apertures, said prong-receiving channel having inherent expansibility and contractibility by virtue of the resilience of said wings and having a smooth projectionless inner surface adapted to engage and wipe the inserted prong throughout the length of said channel, said contact part hav'- ing longitudinal slits therein to supplement its resilient vgripping of the prong, whereby good electrical contact with said prong and secure holding of the prong are maintained. l

6. An electrical socket receptacle for a vacuum tube having aKterminal prong, comprising a pair of thin'superposed aperturedinsulating plates with an aperture of one plate in alignment with an aperture of the other plate to receive said prong, a' metallic contact member composed of a single piece of thin resilient metal and comprising a contact part, a terminal part, and a ilat anchoring 'part connecting the contact part f one ot the apertures and aligned with the apertures to receive said prong, said contact part comprising a portion formed as an angularly divergent prolongation of said anchoring part and a pair of wings or arms extending from said portion in a direction parallel to said plates and directed toward each other about an axis perpendicular to 'said plates, the said wings forming with s aid portion a channel generally conformableto the contourof said prong and aligned axially with said apertures to receive and resiliently grip said prong' when it is inserted through said apertures, said prong-receiving channel having inherent expansibility and contractibility by virtue of the resilience of said wings and having a smooth projectionless inner surface adapted to engage and wipe the inserted prong throughout the length ofsaid channel.' whereby good electrical contact with 4said. prong and secure holding of the prong are maintained, and fiat supporting means extending from said wings between said plates atv the supported end of said channel for supporting said contact part at points 'spaced from said gripping part. i

LOUIS T. FREDERICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2485364 *Aug 2, 1946Oct 18, 1949British Mechanical Prod LtdContact element for plug-in sockets
US2486115 *Aug 3, 1946Oct 25, 1949Chiuchiolo Frank AElectric wire connection
US2711524 *Oct 8, 1952Jun 21, 1955American Phenolic CorpElectrical contact
US2724813 *Aug 5, 1953Nov 22, 1955Gen Motors CorpTerminal connector
US2727299 *Feb 27, 1953Dec 20, 1955Heyman Mfg CompanyProcess for making electrical terminals
US2745080 *Nov 19, 1951May 8, 1956Ind Hardware Mfg Co IncSocket for radio tubes and the like
US3040288 *Feb 27, 1958Jun 19, 1962Phelps Dodge Copper ProdMeans for connecting metal jacketed coaxial cable
US3543227 *Mar 26, 1968Nov 24, 1970Hughes Aircraft CoContact spring for electrical socket contact
US3631373 *May 20, 1970Dec 28, 1971Berg Electronics IncPluggable socket connector
US3665600 *Jul 25, 1969May 30, 1972Auto Swage Products IncMethod of forming electrical connectors
US4466684 *Dec 17, 1981Aug 21, 1984Texas Instruments IncorporatedLow insertion force connector
US4606599 *Jul 25, 1984Aug 19, 1986Texas Instruments IncorporatedLow insertion force connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/752, 439/684, 29/874
International ClassificationH01R43/00, H01R33/76
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/00, H01R33/7628
European ClassificationH01R43/00, H01R33/76B2B