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Publication numberUS2128193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1938
Filing dateFeb 4, 1938
Priority dateFeb 4, 1938
Publication numberUS 2128193 A, US 2128193A, US-A-2128193, US2128193 A, US2128193A
InventorsShane Conrad B
Original AssigneeC B Shane Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Overcoat
US 2128193 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 23, 1938. c. B. sHANE OVERCOAT Filed Feb. 4, 1958 'Patented Aug. 23, 1938 UNiTED STATES OVERCOAT Conrad B. Shane, Wilmette, Ill., assignor to C. B.

Shane Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application February 4, 1938, Serial No. 188,658

6 Claims.

This invention relates to a sleeved outer garment, such as a topcoat or overcoat. The present improvements have to do with the construction of such a garment by which .it may be fitted with a removable body lining, the lining being wearer.

At the present time sleeved topcoats and overcoats having a`sleeveless removable lining have attained considerable popularity. The use of such sleeveless linings, however, often leaves something to be desired, viz., inner sleeves within the coat sleeves or linings for extra warmth to the wearers arms. The application of sleeves to a lining, if made according to usual tailoring procedure, is relatively expensive, and may not combine properly with the coat sleeves when the lining sleeves are fitted thereinto. It is with a view to overcoming such deciencies, inter alia, that the present improvements have been devised.

An exemplication of this invention is set forth in the accompanying drawing wherein- Figure 1 is a. view of an overcoat or topcoat, looking toward the inside, and showing the full lining therein partly detached, one of the lining sleeves being outside the coat sleeve into which it is designed to fit;

Fig. 2 which is a fragmentary view shows one side of the lining to which an associated sleeve is partly connected; and

Fig. 3 is enlarged transverse section through one coat sleeve having a lining sleeve fitted therewithin.

The present topcoat or overcoat which is made from suitable fabric material, comprises opposed fronts 4 each having an associated facing 5 which may extend for the full length of the garment, as is customary. A connection line 6 which extends downwardly from the shoulder region for a substantial distance lies inwardly of the facing edge I which is remote from the free edge of the garment frontf The facing may also be joined to a tape (not shown) which is attached invisibly to the front along a line which lies inwardly of the facing edge l. 'Ihe portion of the facing which is thus free forms in effect a ap to the under side of which is secured a second tape (not shown) which carries a row of metallic hook fasteners 8. This row of fasteners lies beneath the flap so as to be concealed from view, and is also located relatively close to the stitching line 6, all as explained at length in my Patent No. 2,069,628, granted February 2, 1937. The garment full body lining 9 is equipped around its edges (except the bottom) with a row of complementary hook fasteners I adapted to interengage the row of fasteners 8 in response to operations of a slide as is customary. Such a lining may accordingly be secured in place by a Connection which is continuous and also detachable, permitting the lining to be removed whenever desired. 'I'he present garment will, of course, be constructed with the usual arm holes, sleeves II, collar, pockets, etc.

My present invention is directed toward the combination with a removable body lining of the general kind just set forth, of a pair of sleeve linings each joined thereto in a manner which will facilitate application of the sleeve linings to the body lining and of the body lining with attached sleeve linings to the garment, which will economize on the material and labor required, which will t correctly without tailoring, and which will afford full freedom to all usual movements of the wearers arms. To accomplish these and other ends, each sleeve lining I2 is desirably faced interiorly and exteriorly with materials of unlike characteristics, that I3 within being smooth and that I4 without being relatively rough. With a sleeve lining so formed, the wearer may slide his arms easily in or out whereas the sleeve itself will tendto stay put within the coat sleeve, once it has been inserted therewithin.

Each sleeve lining is opened at its upper end so as to join with the arm hole opening in the body lining, as best shown in Fig. 2. VThe connection between the sleeve lining and body lining is not continuous, however, and need not be owing to the special conditions surrounding use of the garment in question. In order to serve the` present requirements, I prefer to employ between the body lining and sleeve lining an extended connection I over or upon the'shoulder and a spot connection I6 therebelow. The former may be conveniently provided by stitching or by complementary rows of hook fasteners together with a slide I'I by which to make or break such connection with ease, and the latter by one or more snap fasteners of conventional type. Such forms of fastening devices while admirably suit- Rassen DEC 2 4 190.@

nection thus provided between the body lining and its sleeve liningsv is not only detachable, but is relatively short as Well thus conducing to enhanced ventilation and freedom of movement therebetween. The Aextended connection over the shoulder affords an ample line of suspension to'prevent distortion of the lining portions, while the spot connection therebelow will be sufcient to hold the sleeve lining in place at that point.

In use, the coat complete with its own sleeves, may be worn without any lining at all. In that event it is admirably suited for light weather. For heavier weather the lining, either with or without its own sleeve portions, may be applied to the coat in the manner already indicated. If the lining sleeve linings are also to be used, they should rst be attached in place and then inserted within the sleeves of thecoat where they tend to remain smooth and extended by reason of their exterior facings (as of leather or wool) which resist free sliding movement relative to the surface of any material in engagement therewith. If desired, the sleeve linings may be taken out and detached from the body lining without complete removal of the latter from the coat. With the sleeve linings in use, extra warmth is afforded to the arms of the wearer without, however, impairment of freedom of movement because of the loose type of connection at the arm holes of the body lining. Furthermore, the sleeve linings are hung or suspended from .the body lining throughout extended lines-of connection which lie close to the line of connection between the body lining and the ycoat (see Figs. 1 and 2). 'I'his is important because the smooth appearance of the garment should be preserved in any event. 'Ihe herein described manner of suspension of the body lining with respect to the coat and of the sleeve linings with respect to the body lining is such that there is an even distribution of the load without localized pulling or straining; and the absence of any but a spot connection between the sleeve linings and body lining at points below the shoulder assures of no interference with this smooth hanging effect which is so essential in a high grade outer garment.

I claim: l. In an outer garment, thecombination of a sleeved coat, a body lining t'ted within the coat,

in proximity to the detachable connection line between the body lining and coat.

2. In an outer garment, the combination of a sleeve coat, a body lining 4fitted within the coat,

a detachable connection between the body lining and coat extending in a line over the two shoulders and past the neck therebetween, a pair of sleeve linings, an extended detachable connection between each sleeve lining and the body lining disposed in a line over the shoulder in proximity to the detachable connection line between the body lining and coat, and a detachable spot connection between each sleeve lining and the body lining spaced from the extended connection therebetween.

3 In an outer garment, the combination of a sleeved coat, a body lining tted within the coat, a detachable connection between the body lining and coat, a pair of sleeve linings receivable within the coat sleeves, and a detachable connection between each sleeve lining and the body lining, the sleeve linings being provided with inner and outer facings relatively smooth Vand rough, respectively, whereby to facilitate sliding arm movements within such sleeve linings and to oppose sliding movements of the sleeve linings within the coat sleeves.

4. A body lining attachable to a sleeved outer garment, there being arm holes in the body lining, a pair of sleeve linings attachable to the body lining one at each arm hole therein, and a detachable connection between each sleeve lining and the body lining extending through a region above the body lining arm holes adapted to furnish a localized suspension support for the sleeve linings.

5. A body lining attachable to a sleeved outer garment, there being arm holes in the body lining, a pair of sleeve linings attachable to the body lining one at each arm-hole therein, and a substantially continuous connection between each sleeve lining and the body lining extending through and coniined to a region above the lining arm holes only adapted to furnish a localized suspension support for the sleeve linings.

6. In an outer garment, the combination of a sleeved coat, a.,body lining iltted within the coat, a detachable connection between the body 1ining and coat extending in a line over the two shoulders and past the neck therebetween, a pair of sleeve linings, an extended connection between each sleeve lining and thebody lining disposed in a line over the shoulder and terminating at points on opposite sides of said shoulder and in proximity to the detachable connection line be-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4320538 *Oct 23, 1980Mar 23, 1982Gilbert SaftWearing apparel
US4999850 *Dec 26, 1989Mar 19, 1991Grilliot William LFirefighter's integrated garment
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/97, 2/125
International ClassificationA41D27/04, A41D27/02
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/04
European ClassificationA41D27/04