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Publication numberUS2129239 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1938
Filing dateMar 27, 1933
Priority dateMar 27, 1933
Publication numberUS 2129239 A, US 2129239A, US-A-2129239, US2129239 A, US2129239A
InventorsRook Clay H, Rook James A
Original AssigneeRook Clay H, Rook James A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ignition device
US 2129239 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 6, 1938. J. A. ROOK ET AL IGNITION DEVICE Filed March 27, 1933 nrne , UNITED STATES PATENT [OFFICE 2.129.239 IGNITION DEVICE James A. Book and (Jclzlyufi. Book, Log Angcles,

Application March 27.1933, Serial no; 662,985 10 Claims. (U1315846) This invention relates generallyto hydrocarbon burners, more particularly to an ignition apparatus for the same.

One form of hydrocarbon burner generally employed in stoves or the like consists of combustion chambers formed by a plurality of cylindrical perforated shells or mantles that are mounted on a base having fuel distribution channels formed therein, together with wicks which serve to preheat the mantles sufliciently to cause vaporization of the fuel.

In starting burners of this type it is necessary to light the wicks. This is usually'done with a torch or the like. Lighting and subsequent handling of the torch is not only troublesome, but it is necessary to remove the lids of the stove in order to reach the wicks. Various-forms of ignition apparatus have heretofore been employed in lieu of the torch for the above stated purpose, the most common of which produces sion electric spark adjacent the wicks.

Although such devices serve their intended purpose, they are not only expensive to install (due to the expensive auxiliary apparatus required) but light the wick at one or more points and only when the wick is in a thereto. As it to become entirely ignited, there give out oil fumes due to insufiicient combustion during this period. Also after this circle of fire is formed it is necessary to allow the same to burn long enough to heat the mantles sufiiciently to cause vaporization, i. e. before admitting more fuel into the burner.

It is therefore the object of the present inven tion to produce an ignition apparatus which will eliminate the above stated objectionable features.

Another object is to provide an electric ignition apparatus which may be easily and quickly in stalled in a burner of the character referred to and which will instantly ignite the wick at all points.

A further object is to provide an ignition device for hydrocarbon burners that may be operated from usual 110 v. light current, or other A. C. or D. C. circuits Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, reference'being had to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical section taken through a stove and a hydrocarbon burner nition apparatus of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the improved ignimoved;

a high ten-- annular member 28 formed equipped with the ig-v tion' element applied to a burner tube shown in Figs. 1 and 2, parts being broken away and shown insection.

Fig.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section taken on line 5-5-01. Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a modified form of the invention.

Fig. 7 is a section takenon line 1-1 of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is another modified form.

Fig. 9 is a section taken on line 99 of Fig. 8.

Referring bynumerals to the accompanying drawing, more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, l0 designates a stove orheater that is provided with a conventional hydrocarbon burner l2.

Burner l2 consists of a plurality of concentriiron base l8. The innermost tube and the space between shells l4 and i5 are closed at the upper end thereof as indicated at I9, while the open'spaces between the tubes form combustion chambers designated at 20.

Formed on the-base is V The hydrocarbon fuel is supplied through a pipe controlled by a valve (not shown) tubes sutficiently to produce combustion.

The present invention resides in the means for igniting-the wicks and consists primarily of an of electrical insulating and non-combustible material, and an electrical resistance'element encircling the same. In the present instance thefelement is shown in the form of a resistance coil designated at 29.

Formed on the lower end of member 28 is an annular ofiset 30 that rests on a corresponding shoulder formed on the flange of the burner base,

and formed on the upper end of the member is a similar-offset 3| that extends into and centers the combustion tube indicated at 32 thereon, as clearly shown in Fig. 3.

, Resistance coil 23 rests in a groove '33 formed 4 is a top plan view with the mantle re-- 2 in the peripheral place on the member in case of breakage;

Formed in member 28 are a plurality of perforations 31 that serve to cause equal combustion.

Block 35 extends downwardly through the draft opening 23 as shown in Fig. 1, and the terminals 38 of the coil are connected through heat insulated conductors 39 to the binding posts 40 of a conduit box II that carries a switch 42. Formed on the conduit box is a socket that receives the plug '43 of a flexible conduit that is adapted to be connected to a lamp socket or other source of current.

The above described apparatus is particularly adapted to be installed in burners already constructed or in use, in which instance the combustion tubes to which the members 28 are applied should either be cut off or new ones of proper length supplied so that all the tubes will be flush at the. upper ends.

Referring to Figs. 6 and '7, the member is cast or otherwise permanently secured to the tube designated at 5| and is provided with a groove to receive the resistance coil 29', the terminals of which extend through openings formed in a block 53. Formed in the member is a plurality of openings that register with openings in the tube.

The above described form is adapted to be furnished with the burner or substituted for the combustion tubes of a burner that is-in use.

In the construction shown in Figs. 8 and 9, the member designated at 51 is secured to or formed on a metal ring or band 56 that is adapted to be applied to the tube, and formed in the peripheral face of the member is a groove in which is mounted the resistance coil 29a. The terminals of the coil extend through openings in a block 58, there being a recess 59 formed in the tube to permit passage of to the tube. A plurality of aligned openings 60 ,are formed in the member and tube.

The above modified forms are adapted to be connected with the source of electric current in the same manner as that shown in Fig. 1.

In starting the burner, it is only necessary to turn on the switch 42 to energize the resistance coil, which (when it becomes hot) ignites the wick at all points, which intum results in heating the-tubes sufficiently to cause combustion, whereupon the switch may be turned off.

We claim:

1. A combustion tube burner having a base provided with a fuel channel, means to supply fuel to said channel, a combustion chamber above said fuel channel, awick in said channel, and means for igniting the wick and the fuel carried thereby at atmospheric temperature, said means comprising an electric resistance igniting element in said chamber positioned closely adjacent saidwick and substantially coextensive therewith.

2. A combustion tube burner having a base provided with a fuel channel, means to supply fuel to said channel, a combustion chamber above said fuel channel, a wick in said channel, an insulating element in said combustion chamber, a resistance element carried by said insulating member and closely adjacent the plane of the upper end of said wick and substantially coface of member 18, the free end of which extends through openings SI formed the block while applying the member extensive therewith for igniting, the same at atmospheric temperature, and means for admitting air to said combustion chamber below said resistance element.

' 3. Inc. hydrocarbon burner including perforated tubes providing a combustion zone, a base having a fluid channel therein, a wick within the channel and extending into the combustion zone, an insulating member associated with said. base and' an electric resistance element carried by said insulating member adjacent said wick for igniting the same at atmospheric temperature, said insulating member being provided with perforations for the admission of air below said resistance element.

4. A combustion tube burner comprising a liquid fuel trough, a plurality of spaced, perforated combustion tubes extending upwardly therefrom forming a combustion zone, a wick in said fuel trough and extending to said combustion zone, an insulating member in the lower portion of said combustion zone, and an electric resistance element carried by said insulating member and positioned adjacent the upper end of said wick and substantially coextensive therewith for lgniting the same and the fuel carried thereby at atmospheric temperature.

5. The construction as set forth in claim 4 and havingv means whereby air may be admitted to said combustion zone beneath said resistance element.

6. The construction as set forth in claim 4 wherein the insulating member is mounted on one of said combustion tubes.

'7. The construction as set forth in claim 4 wherein the insulating member is mounted on said fuel trough and supports one of said combustion tubes- 8. A combustion tube burner having a base provided with a fuel channel, means to supply fuel to said channel, a combustion chamber above said fuel channel, a wick in said channel, insulating means in said combustion chamber, a resistance element carried by said insulating means and closely adjacent the plane of the upper end of said wick and substantially coextensive therewith for igniting the same at atmospheric temperature, and means for admitting air to said combustion chamber below said resistance element.

9. A combustion tube burner comprising a liquid fuel trough, a plurality of spaced, perforated combustion tubes extending upwardly therefrom and forming a combustion zone, a wick in said fuel trough and extending to said combustion zone, insulating means in the lower portion of said combustion zone, and an electric resistance element carried by said insulating means and po- 'sitioned adjacent the upper end of said wick and substantially coextensive therewith for igniting the same and the fuel carried thereby at atmospheric temperature.

10. A combustion tube burner having a base provided with a fuel channel, means to supply fuel to said channel, a combustion chamber above said fuel channel, a wick in said channel and means for igniting the fuel, said means comprising an electric resistance igniting element in said chamber positioned above said wick to be directly in the range of active combustion and substantially coextensive therewith.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2438823 *Dec 16, 1943Mar 30, 1948Perfection Stove CoElectrical igniter for pot-type liquid fuel burners
US2603281 *May 2, 1949Jul 15, 1952 Vaporizing fokced draft oil buhner
US2710652 *Apr 9, 1951Jun 14, 1955Mini Of Nat DefencePot type oil burner
US4122764 *Aug 24, 1977Oct 31, 1978Ambra Grace DPortable food warmer
US4525137 *Apr 5, 1982Jun 25, 1985Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Liquid fuel combustion device
US6550469 *May 16, 2001Apr 22, 2003Huang-Hsi HsuIgnition device for stove
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/196, 431/262, 431/200
International ClassificationF24C5/14, F24C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C5/14
European ClassificationF24C5/14