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Publication numberUS2129345 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1938
Filing dateJul 6, 1937
Priority dateJul 6, 1937
Publication numberUS 2129345 A, US 2129345A, US-A-2129345, US2129345 A, US2129345A
InventorsCover Berkey E
Original AssigneeCover Dual Signal Systems Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined fire alarm, police alarm, and intercommunicating system
US 2129345 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 6, 1938. I q B, CQVER 2,129,34.":" v

COMBINED FIRE ALARM, POLICE ALARM, AND INTERCOMMUNICATING SYSTEM Filed July 6. 1937 OPEN DOOR Patented Sept. 6, 1938 PATENT OFFICE oonmnmn FIRE ALARM, POLICE ALARM, 'AND INTERCOMMUNICATING SYSTEM Bel-key E.

Cover, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Cover Dual Signal Systems, Inc.

Application July 6, 1937, Serial l lo. 151,998

8 Claims. (Cl. 179'-5) y present invention relates to the provision of a combined fire alarm, police alarm and intercommunicating system between street boxes and a central ofllce, and my objects are to provide facilities which will permit ofilcial or non-oflicial individual members of the community to communicate from a street box with the central ofllce, without any technical knowledge, either orally or by means of coded signals, and will also 10 permit the operator at central oflice to create signals at a particular street box for the purpose of calling the attention of omcials in the vicinity of the box and will permit the central operator to communicate orally with the person who 18 answers the signals at the street box.

A further object is' to provide such facilities in a form which will permit of their economical installation and which, when installed, will secure and assure great simplicity and dependability in 20 operation without any interference between the divers signals.

As will hereinafter be seen, these combined facilities are secured through the use of a single metallic circuit between the street box and central ofilce; that the nature of the call, whether relating to fire or police matters, is automatically disclosed at central ofiice through the instrumentality of either the particular door opened at the street box or the particular code signal so operated; that all that is required for communication from the street box is the opening of an unlocked door and either normally talking in response to questions or the turning of the arm of a plainly labeled code signal device, or the 5 opening of a locked door and normally telephoning; and that all that is required for the central operator to communicate with the street box are the normal operations of plugging in a suitable connector and the manipulation of two usual 44) central office or switch board switches.

I have attained the heretofore mentioned objects andresults by means of the arrangement of instrumentalities illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1 is an elevation of a desirable form of street box for employment with my organization, and

Fig. 2 is a schematic diagram of my system or organization for signal transmission and so intercommunication.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the respective views.

It has constantly been my object to depart as little as possible from the principles and instrumentalities employed in standard telephony,

and to maintain the system constantly in condition to permit the employment of standard telephony thereon or thereover, and to link my system with standard telephone equipment, so

that the messages and signals may be transmitted, when necessary and desirable, over standard telephonic systems by merely placing the plugs forming a portion of the standard systems in appropriate sockets or receptacles provided in my organization.

The street box, it will be seen from Fig. 1, is provided with an upper unlocked door A which may be readily opened by any individual of the public. Immediately behind the door A, as shown schematically in Fig. 2, are mounted a microphone 3-and spring rotated code transmitters I and 2, which respectively control the origination of coded police and fire alarm signals. Within the compartment behind the doorA is also mounted a loud speaker 4. Below the door A is a locked door B, behind which is installed an ordinary cradle 61' monophone it, which consists of a removable hand piece carrying both a receiver and transmitter and a stand for receiving the hand piece provided with the usual switching arrangement so that the lifting of the hand piece cuts the monophone in on the line and the replacing of the hand piece on the stand cuts the monophone out of the line.

As most clearly seen in Fig. 2 there is provided, in the street box a switch having a blade 5 and contact 5a which is closed when the unlocked door is opened, the purpose of which will be hereafter described, and switch I6,. which is momentarily opened when the locked door is. opened, so that in co-operation with facilities provided at the central oifice ordinary telephony over the cradle or monophone may be conducted without interference from the other apparatus in the street boxes.

Upon the top of the street box is mounted a signal lamp 9 and within the street box is mounted a standard flashing switch 9a in association with the circuit of the lamp 9. Within the street box is also mounted a siren or other aural signal Illa and a local battery or connection for supplying power I5 to the lamp 9 and sound signal Illa. For controlling the operation of the lamp I provide a relay 1 and for controlling the operation of the siren or aural signal I provide a relay Ill.

The battery it, which normally energizes the line, has a lead llii from the positive side thereof running to a contact 32, which is normally in contact with the ring contacting blade 3i of a standard tip, ring, and Sleeve contact jack. The ring blade 3| of the jack is connected through a testing.,-. witch (reference characters 26 to 29a inclusive) iiwith the incoming contact 22 in the base of the 'monophone normally in contact with terminal 24 connected through blades 24a. and 24b of the switch l6 through the winding of relay 1 with terminal 5 of the switch which is closed when door A of the street box is opened.

The circuit proceeds from terminal 5 through the loud speaker 4, microphone 3, code transmitters 2 and through contact 23 and blade 2|, held in contact with contact 23, when the monophone is on its stand, thence to the tip contacting blade 34 of the jack of which the ring contacting blade 3| is a portion, and from thence successively through contact 33, relay 52 and relay 46 .to the opposite negative pole of battery 44'.

It will be seen by an examination of the diagram in Fig. 2 that the circuit leading from switch l6, momentarily opened when the locked door B is opened, through solenoid I, through contact 5 to the loud speaker 4, is by-passed through a suitable resistance 6 and contact 5a of the switch, closed when the door A is opened,

50 that immediately upon the opening of the door A the energy through the relay I is reduced so as to permit of the falling of the blade 6 of the relay out of contact with terminal 80. of this relay and the closing of the local circuit through the lamp 9 and flasher 9a.

It will thus be seen that the light 9 upon the street box will flash while door A is open and can also be made to flash from central office by any interruption of the line circuit from ring blade 3| heretofore referred to.

The aural signal Illa at the street box controlled by the relay I0 is caused to operate by sending an alternating current out over the line, in a manner hereafter to be described, through ring blade 3| and switch |6 through relay III, the return of which is grounded at l4 through a condenser l3. When an alternating current 'is supplied to relay H) from central'station the local circuit through the aural signal Illa is closed and the siren is caused to operate.

When by-pass resistance 6 is cut into the line by the closing of contacts 5 and 5a, which occurs upon the opening of the door A, sufilcient additional energy flows through the relay 52 to pick up the blade thereof and close the circuit through the switchboard light 55 from the positive side of battery 44 through terminals 53 and 54 of relay 52 and light 55 back to the negative pole of battery 44 which insures the energizing of relay 46 while light 55 is burning.

Relay 46 holds up, or is sufllciently energized to positively operate with the ordinary line current, and when the current is increased by closing the by-pass circuit through the resistance 6 it stays held up.

When the line current, heretofore described, is interrupted at the street box either momentarily through switch l6, when door B is opened, or through the operation of either of the code transmitters I or 2, relay 46 is de-energized. This immediately puts energy on the trouble light 49 at the switchboard from the positive side of battery 44 through blade 33 and contact 39 of relay 35 and blade 5| and contact 49 of relay 46 through the trouble light 49. This contact also sends energy through the end 42B of relay 42 back to the negative side of battery 44. The energizing of end 428 of relay 42 pulls blades 31 and 43 of relay 42 into contact respectively with of the battery.

As heretofore described blade 43 and terminal 43a have been locked in closed position through the energizing ofrelay 42 through contact between blade 31 and contact 4| so that a momentarily interrupted or intermittent current through relay 46 causes the flashing of both the trouble lamp 49 and the signal light 46 through blade 5| and contact 41a at central oflice.

To recapitulate: The opening of door A at the street box causes the lighting of lamp 55 at the central station and either the operation of the code transmitters or 2 or the opening of door B causes the flashing of trouble light 49 and signal light 40 at the central station.

When the central operator receives a signal the central operator may, if desired, if the signal be a code, permit of its automatic reception by the code receiver 50. The central operator, however, may also insert the answering plug 66 into thereceiving jack 30. The mere insertion of the plug 66 in the jack 30 breaks the line circuit between the blade 3| and contact 32 and blade 34 and contact 33, which kills light 55 and its associated mechanism. Themere insertion of the plug 60 in the jack 30 also places energy from the negative side of battery through sleeve contact 58 of plug Bil-and sleeve contact of jack 39, upon relay 36 which is connected directly with the positive side of battery 44 which breaks contact through blade 38 and terminal 39 of relay 36 and de-energizes both blades 5| of relay 46 and blade 37 of relay 42, thereby killing signal light 40. In the energized position of relay 36 contact is made between blade 38 of ,that relay, energized by direct connection with the positive side of battery 44, through terminal 39a, so as to re-energlze relay 46 and extinguish the trouble light 49. I

To recapitulate: Upon the insertion of plug 60 in jack 30, lights 55 and 40 are rendered inoperative and trouble light 49 is extinguished.

We will now proceed to the description of the mechanism manually operated at central station for sending signals to the street box and telephonic communication therewith.

So far as manipulation is required, central oflice equipment is standard and usual in all respects. The switchboard, as is usual, besides its row of sockets, one from each station, it is provided with jacks as exemplified by jack 30, heretofore described, with call light 55, alarm or police call light 40 and trouble light 49 suitably related with their respective jack and standard tip, ring and sleeve contact plugs, such as 69 heretofore described. There are a pair, as is usual, of standard switchboard cam keys 65 and 66. Cam key 65 is .of the non-locking type in which the handle stands vertically in normal position and may be either pushed forward, away irom,'or 'pulled towards the operator in accordance with what result the operator wishes to secure. The cam key 66 is known as the locking type and remains in the position in which it is placed until it is manually moved to another position. I

The mere insertion of the plug 88 into the jack 38 opens the circuit between blade 3| and contact 32 and contact 38 and blade 84, and, as heretofore described, places negative energy from the battery 44 on the sleeve of jack 88, which, through the functioning of the relay 86, as heretofore described, cuts out lamps 55, 48, 48 and the code recording mechanism 68. Central operator, provided with head set I53, pushes the lever of cam key 66 forward, which closes the circuit between contacts 81 and 88 and 88 and 84. Contacts 88 and 8| and 88 and SI remain closed in both the normal or vertical and in the fonward position of cam key 66. The closing of contacts 88 and 8| closes'a circuit from the negative pole of battery 44 through the variable resistance 94a through cord supervising relay winding 94 through contacts 88 and 8|, through contacts 14 and 15, through contacts 13 and 12 to the ring contact 51 of plug 68, from whence negative energy from thebattery goes out over the line through blade 3| heretofore described.

Positive energy from battery 44 proceeds through a portion of the relay winding 84 through contacts 98 and SI, through contacts 69 and 18,

through contacts 68 and 61 to the tip 59 of plug 68 and thence through blade 34 out over the line, as heretofore described. The closing of contacts 83 and 84 and 81 and 88 closes the headset across the circuit just described.

Central operator now presses the lever of cam switch 65 backwardly, which causes contacts 68 and 18 and 14 and 15 to open and contacts 18 and 1| and 15 and 16 and 11 and 18 to close. The closing of contacts 11 and 18 closes the circuit through the winding I88 of the loud speaker con-' trol relay which closes the circuit from the positive side of the battery I81 through variable resistance I86, blade I83, contact I82 to the carbon buttons of a two button microphone I84, and

- thence to a central tap in the primary I85 of the microphone transformer back to the negative side of the battery I81,

The closing of the contacts 15 and 16 connects one side of the secondary of the microphone transformer through contacts 12 and 13 with the ring contact 61 of the plug 68 and the closing ofcontacts 18 and 1| connects the opposite end of the secondary of the microphone transformer through contacts 68 and 61 with the tip 59 of the plug 68, thereby closing the circuit from the secondary of the microphone transformer through the circuit of the street box. The operator is now equipped to talk to a party at the street box by means of loud speaker 4. Such a communication is an inquiry as to what is the nature of the call, and as soon as this inquiry is made the operator restores cam key lever 65 to a normal position, which closes contacts 69 and 18 and 14 and 15 and opens contacts 11 and 18, which opens the microphone circuit through the action of the relay I88 and restores the circuit through the head phones and the street box, thereby permitting the operator If central operator pulls the lever of cam key 66 forward the circuit will be opened between contacts 88 and 9| and 88 and 8| and the battery and head phone I58 will be separated from the line.

This will cause the operation of relay 1 at thestreet box and the flashing of the light 8 at the street box. If the central operator pulls the lever of cam switch 65 forward the circuit out over the line will be broken between contacts 61 and 68 and 12 and 18, and the circuit will be closed between contacts 12 and 64, which sends an alternating current from a source thereof 63a to the ring contact 51 of plug 68 and from thence through blade 3| out over the line where it operates the relay I8 to cause the operation of the sound signal We at the street box.

It will therefore be seen that the central operator may cause the dashing of 'the light 8 at the street box so as to call the attention of a policeman or squad car thereto by pulling the lever of cam key 66 forward, and if the matter be very urgent the central operator can, at the same time, cause the operation of the siren or sound signal I80 by pulling forward the lever of cam key 65...

When door 13 is unlocked and open the circuit is closed, as heretofore described, through the switchboard lamp 48 by the opening of the circuit through 'the momentary operation of switch I6. Th'e lifting of the cradle or monophone I8 from its carriage breaks the line circuit at 2| and 28 and 22 and 24, cutting out the circuit through the other apparatus located at the street box and closing circuits at I9 and 2| and 28 and 22 through the monophone I8. Therefore, when the light 48 is received and if it is not in a characteristic code form, as would be caused by operation of code transmitters I and 2, central operator is aware that they call is coming from the monophone and inserts into Jack 38 a standard answering plug instead of the plug 68, as heretofore described, as the telephone over the cradle phone I8 is standard in all particulars.

Having described my invention what I claim is new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a plurality of separated stations and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated m'eans located at one of said stations, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting said circuitand three interacting means located at the other of said stations, one responsive to an increase of current flow in said circuit, one responsive to the interruption ofsaid circuit and the third, the action of which is initiated at its station, of location, which blocks the operation of said other two means.

2. An alarm and an inter-communicating-syk tem comprising a central and remote station and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated means located at said remote station, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting said circuit, and three interacting means located at the said central station, one responsive to an increase of' current flow in said circuit, one responsive to the interruption of said circuit and the third, the action of which is initiated at its station of location, which blocks the operation of said other two means.

3. An alarm and aninter-communicating system comprising a central and remote station and 78 a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated means located at said remote station, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting-said 'u- 14 cult, and a third locally installed control means responsive to the operation of said other two 10- cally installed means whereby its action may be initiated by either of said means or by interrupting said circuit at central station.

4. An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a central and remote station and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated means located at said remote station, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting said circuit, and a third locally installed control means responsive to the operation of said other two 10- cally installed means whereby its action may be initiated by either of said means or by interruptlng said circuit at central station and a fourth locally installed control means responsive to a grounded alternating current transmitted over a leg of said circuit and operable alone or co-temporaneously with said last mentioned means.

5. An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a central and remote station and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated means located at said remote station, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting said circuit, and a third locally installed control means responsive to the operation of said-other two locally installed means whereby its action may be initiated by either of said means or by interrupting said circuit at central station, and an independently powered signal means, the action of which is controlled by said last mentioned means.

6. An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a central and remote station and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, a pair of independently, automatically operated means located at said remote station, one of said means for changing the resistance in said circuit and the other of said means for interrupting said circuit, and a-third locally installed control means responsive to the operation of said other two locally installed means whereby its action may be initiated by either of said means or by interrupting said circuit at central station and a locally powered signal means, the action of which is controlled by said last mentioned means.

7. An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a plurality of separated stations and. a complete metallic circuit therebetween, there being included in said system and installed at one of said stations means responsive to an increase of current in said circuit and other means responsive to an interruption of said circuit, said last mentioned means being provided with facilities for locking itself in operation and a third means operative to prevent the operation of said first two operative means.

8 An alarm and an inter-communicating system comprising a plurality of separated stations and a complete metallic circuit therebetween, there being included in said system and installed at one of said stations means responsive to an increase of current in said circuit and other means responsive to an interruption of said circuit, said means being related so that the operation of the means responsive to an increase of current during its operation will prevent the operation of said other means.

BERKEY E. COVER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2822423 *Jul 30, 1954Feb 4, 1958Claesson Per H EFire and police intercommunication system
US3009023 *May 8, 1959Nov 14, 1961Gamewell CoTelephone-equipped alarm box
US3800089 *Feb 24, 1972Mar 26, 1974IttHands-free emergency telephone system
US5386463 *Nov 17, 1992Jan 31, 1995Kings Iii Of America, Inc., North AmericaLow noise multi-elevator communication system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/47
International ClassificationH04M11/04
Cooperative ClassificationH04M11/04
European ClassificationH04M11/04