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Publication numberUS2129924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1938
Filing dateJun 15, 1934
Priority dateJun 15, 1934
Publication numberUS 2129924 A, US 2129924A, US-A-2129924, US2129924 A, US2129924A
InventorsArch H Galbraith
Original AssigneeArch H Galbraith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underground tank system
US 2129924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1938. fA. H. GALBRAlTH UNDERGROUND TANK SYSTEM Original Filed June 15, 1934 ATTORNEYS.

Patented Sept. 13, 1938 UNITED STATES IPAT-'ENT OFFICE UNDERGROUND TANK SYSTEM Arch H. Galbraith, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Application June 15, 1934, vSerial No. 730,743 Renewed February 4, 1938 7 Claims.

This invention relates to the provision of a removable valve structure for underground liquid storage tanks, and more particularly to the connectionsv permitting the ready detachment of l'5 the vertical suction pipe for removal without reconnection to a subterranean tank, .a filling pipe.

terminating adjacent the ground level in an enlargement, and a suction line extending up through the ller pipe and through a side wall of .the enlargement, with a make and ybreak connection accessible from the Aground level through the enlargement of the filler pipe.

In the accompanying drawing,

Fig. 1 represents in vertical section, with parts in elevation, an underground liquid storage tank provided with connections embodying one form of my invention; y

Fig. 2 isa detail perspective view of a doubletapped bushing insertible in the side wall of the enlargement of the well casing;

Fig. 3 is a detail View of the tting employed in the embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. l for facilitating ready attachment and detachment of the vertical pipe carrying the foot valve;

Fig. 4 is a detail View partly Vbroken away of a 'modified form of fitting;

Fig. 5 is an end view of 'the clamp used in the embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 isa detail view of -a modication of the invention according to which a check valve is disposed in the angle which is disconnectible together with the vertical suction pipe.

Underground liquid storage tanks, such 'for example as gasoline or oil tanks, are commonly discharged by a pump to which a suction line runs from the tank. The suction pipe extends vertically from the tank to a level about yone or two feet below the ground level, and then extends horizontally to a point adjacent the pump where it again turns vertically and emerges from the ground. The usual foot valve at the lower end of the suction pipe is subject to clogging for other interruption oi its proper operation, so that frequently these foot valves must lbe removed. Various so-called foot valve extractor fittingsare on the market; but these are quite complicated Vand are accordingly expensive.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawing, `the subterranean tank is shown at 6, and a vertical pipe "i carrying a foot valve 8 is provided for withdrawing liquid from storage. The pipe 1 extends vertically through a well, and it is generally expedient to provide so-me sort of well casing, the casing as illustrated in Fig. 1 taking the form of a pipe I9. Adjacent the ground level this casing is formed with an enlargement l2 closed by a removable cover I3 seating on a gasket I4.

A discharge conduit such as the piping I1 leads to the pump I8 which is rherein illustrated as provided with the usual meter i9 and hose 20 for discharging into the tank of an automobile. The conduit or piping l'l has a projecting inlet extending inwardly through a side wall of the f enlargement i2 of the well casing. In the form illustrated, a double-tapped bushing 22 is threaded in an opening in a side wall of the enlargement l2, the piping il being threaded into the bushing 22 on one side and a tting such as a union 24 being threaded into the other side ,of the bushing.

The fitting 24 is of peculiar character, the purpose of the peculiarity in its form being to facilitate ready connection of the vertical pipe 1 so as to suspend the same in the well. The tting takes somewhat the form of a pipe union; but the portion mounted in the side wall of the enlargement l2 does not terminate in abutting relation with the other part of the union butinstead projects as shown at 25. The other portion 2l of the union is bent into the form of an elbow, and is coupled to the first portion by the usual threaded sleeve or nut 28. The vertical pipe 'l is threaded into the depending end of the elbow portion 21.

It is apparent that by unsorewing the nut 28 the elbow portion 21 can be detached by sliding to the left, as viewed in Fig. 1. A handle and connecting rod 30 is attached to the elbow portion 2T for lifting the Vertical pipe i and foot Valve 8 up through the well for insertion and/or overhauling. The enlargement l2 is made of suiicient size to permit a workman to manipulate a wrench on the nut or threaded sleeve 28 for tightening up or releasing the union. As the piping Il leads away from the well at a level of from one to two feet below the ground, the enlargement I2 makes the fitting 24 readily accessible from the ground level. When the foot valve is to be restored, the pipe 'i is lowered into the well, and at this time the projecting end 25 comes particularly into play. The extremity of this projecting end is preferably tapered, as illustrated more particularly in Fig. 3, so as to assist in guiding the elbow portion as the projecting end 25 enters the portion 21. The two portions are telescoped until the threads on the portion 21 can be easily engaged by the nut or threaded sleeve 28. The mechanic can at this time give his undivided attention to rotating the nut or sleeve with his wrench, as the telescoping of the portions 25 and 21 maintains the parts in alignment. This is a material improvement over the use of the ordinary pipe union which necessitates that the parts be maintained in alignment when threading the nut or sleeve onto the other portion of the union. As the pipe 1 and foot valve 8 may have considerable weight, it is a relief to the mechanic to have the pipe 1 suspended from the projecting portion 25 when he is tightening up the fitting 24.

The connections thus far described introduce a novel construction for lling subterranean tanks. In the above description it has been pointed out that it is preferable to employ a casing in the well within which the pipe 1 is suspended. Using for this casing a pipe I0, such as a four or five inch pipe, opens up the possibility of lling the tank 6 through this well, thus making the pipe I8 a lling pipe. The enlargement I2 aids in such practice, as there is no free opening through the sides of the enlargement i2 permitting leakage of the liquid with which the tank is being lled. The pipe 1 reduces the effective fiow capacity of the pipe I0 when used as a filling pipe; but as my improved construction eliminates one of the connections to the storage tank, the expense of the somewhat larger pipe I0 is more than compensated. rI'he cover I3 and gasket I4 seal the filling pipe so as to prevent the escape of fumes. From the above description of the construction shown in Fig. 1, it will be apparent'that it is not necessary to withdraw the pipe 1 or to make any disconnection otherwise than the removal of the cover I 3 when using the pipe I!) as a lling pipe.

My invention is not limited to the details of the arrangement illustrated in Figs. l and 3. For instance, it may under some circumstances be preferable to employ welding instead of the double-tapped bushing 22. In such case, in one side of an opening in the wall of the enlargement I2 will be welded the piping I1, and in the other side of the opening will be welded the fitting 24. Or the tting 24 may be formed on the end of a length of piping I1 and this piping welded in the opening in the wall of the enlargement I2.

Another form of tting is illustrated in Figs. fi and 5; and as shown the portion 24 corresponds in position and function to the portion 24. In stead of connecting the portion 21 to the portion 2d by a nut or threaded sleeve, a clamp 33 is employed for connecting and disconnecting he portions 24 and 21.

The lower half 34 of the clamp is preferably formed integral with the portion 24. A ange is formed on the end of the portion 21'; and a lange 3E is formed on the upper half of the portion 24. The interior of the clamp 33 is grooved as indicated at 31. The lower half 34 receives the lower half of the flange 35, whereby the portion 21 is hooked or hung suspended with the vertical pipe 1 depending in the well. upper half 34a of the clamp is pivoted to the lower half 34, and may be swung over the flanges 35 and 36 for clamping and wedging the ends of the portions 24 and 21 toward each.

other when the pipe 1 has been hung in the well as above described.

A wing nut 38 is operable for drawing together the parts of the clamp 33 for clamping the portions 24 and 21 together with a gasket 39 interposed for preventing leakage at the joint. The portion 21 corresponds in function and position to the portion 21 of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, being formed as an elbow into whose depending end the pipe 1 is threaded. A connecting rod and handle 30 will be secured to the portion 21' as in the rst embodiment.

In Fig. 6 is illustrated an embodiment of my invention according to which the valve is disposed at the top of the vertical pipe 1 suspended in the well. This means that no foot valve is required and that a check valve is interposed in the suction line where it is readily accessible from the surface of the ground.

A fitting 24' having a portion mounted in the si-de Wall of theenlargement I2 furnishes in this embodiment a readily detachable connection lfor an angle check valve 40, said portion of the tting 24 being threaded into a double-tapped bushing 22, the piping I1 being threaded into the other side of the bushing. The nut 28 of the tting 24 couples the above mentioned portion to a short length of pipe or a nipple 4 I. The outer end of this pipe 4| is threaded into the outlet of the angle check valve 40. The internal i,

arrangement of the angle check valve may be such as will best suit the conditions under which the installation is to operate; and as shown there is provided a lower seat 43 and a superimposed seat 44.

upper seat, thus giving a double check action. The pipe 1 is threaded into the inlet to the angle check valve 4D. As is clear from the description of the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the nut or sleeve 28 may be readily loosened to permitdetachment of the assembly including the pipes 1 and 4I and the angle check Valve 40, this assembly being disposed Where it can be easily reached. Although no rod and handle is shown, the same may be provided if desired; but obviously the assembly may be caught and pulled upwardly by a hook, or other grapple, or even by hand.

While I have illustrated and described certain preferred embodiments of my invention it will be understood that the invention may be otherwise embodied an-d practiced within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A connection for a subterranean tank comprlsing a well casing having an enlargement adjacent its upper end, piping for discharging liquid, said piping having a projecting inlet extending inwardly through the well casing adjacent its upper end, a vertical pipe in the well, a detachable connection telescoping with the projecting inlet for hanging said vertical pipe from said projecting inlet and placing said vertical pipe and said inlet in communication, said connection comprising means accessible from the ground level through said enlargement adjacent the upper end of the well casing and engageable with said projecting inlet for securing the vertical pipe thereto while hung therefrom, and a foot valve carried at the lower end of said vertical P1Pe 2. In combination with a subterranean tank, a Well casing, a pipe extending vertically in the casing, a foot valve carried at the lower end of A'poppet 45 cooperates with the lower seat and a secondpoppet 46 cooperates with the saidI pipe, and a tting mounted in a wall of the casing and communicating with a discharge conduit, said fitting having a projecting portion adapted to telescope with the upper end of said pipe to suspend the same in the casing and attachment means engageable with the upper end of the pipe for drawing the same along said projecting portion into sealing engagement with the tting.

3. In combination with a subterranean tank, an upwardly extending casing connected to the tank and arranged to serve for iilling the same, said casing having an enlargement adjacent the ground level, a suction pipe carrying a foot Valve inserted into the tank through said casing, a discharge conduit having an inlet to which the suction pipe is adapted to be connected, mechanism for detaehably connecting the suction pipe to said inlet, said mechanism being so accommodated within said enlargement as to afford free access to said enlargement for the nozzle of a iilling conduit, and a closure for the casing.

4. In combination with a subterranean tank, an upwardly extending casing connected to the tank and arranged to serve for filling the same, said casing having an enlargement adjacent the ground lever, a suction pipe carrying a foot valve inserted into the tank through said casing, a discharge conduit having an inlet to which the suction pipe is adapted to be connected, the internal cross-section of the casing being suciently larger than the external cross-section of the suction pipe to afford a lling passageway extending to the tank substantially as large as the passageway afforded by the suction pipe, mechanism for detachably connecting the suction pipe to said inlet, said mechanism being so accommodated within said enlargement as to afford free access to said enlargement for the nozzle of a filling con-duit, and a closure for the casing.

5. In combination with a subterranean tank, an upwardly extending casing connected to the tank and arranged to serve for lling the same, said casing having an enlargement adjacent the ground level, a fitting having one portion at the end of a conduit leading through the side of the enlargement to a pump, a suction pipe carrying a foot valve inserted into the tank through said casing and having at its upper end a mating portion of said fitting, said fitting being so disposed in said enlargement as not to substantially interfere with flow of iiuid to the tank during lling, and a closure for the casing.

6. In combination with a subterranean tank, a well casing connected to the tank and extending upwardly therefrom to a desired height, a discharge pipe arranged Within the casing and extending into the tank, a discharge conduit extending through a wall of saidcasing and means for detachably connecting the pipe to the conduit and interposed between them, said means having a projecting portion adapted to cooperate with the upper end of the discharge pipe to suspend the pipe in the casing, the internal cross section of the casing being suciently larger than the external cross section of the discharge pipe to aiord a filling passage extending to the tank of a cross sectional area at least as great as the cross sectional area of the discharge pipe.

7. In combination with a subterranean tank, a well casing connected to the tank and extending upwardly therefrom to a desiredheight, a discharge pipe arranged within the casing and extending into the tank, a discharge conduit extending through a wall of said casing, and means for detachably connecting the pipe to the conduit and interposed between them, said means having a projecting portion adapted to cooperate with the upper end of the discharge pipe to suspend the pipe in the casing, the internal cross section of the casing being suliiciently larger than the external cross section of the discharge pipe to aioid a lling passage extending to the tank of a cross sectional area at least as great as the cross sectional area o-f the discharge pipe, the upper end of said casing being large enough to afford free access from the upper end thereof to the means connecting the pipe and conduit.

ARCH I-I. GALBRAITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4706718 *Jun 17, 1986Nov 17, 1987Universal Valve Co., Inc.Containment manhole having spillage sealing means
US5058633 *Sep 5, 1989Oct 22, 1991Sharp Bruce RContainment assembly for fill pipe of underground storage tanks
US5553971 *Dec 20, 1988Sep 10, 1996Intelpro CorporationDouble-containment underground piping system
US5775842 *Jan 3, 1997Jul 7, 1998Pisces By Opw, Inc.Double containment under ground piping system
US5865216 *Nov 8, 1995Feb 2, 1999Advanced Polymer Technology, Inc.System for housing secondarily contained flexible piping
US6116817 *May 27, 1998Sep 12, 2000Pisces By Opw, Inc.Hydrocarbon fuel piping system with a flexible inner pipe and an outer pipe
USRE37114Dec 19, 1996Mar 27, 2001Advanced Polymer Technology, Inc.Secondary containment flexible underground piping system
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/86.1, 285/192, 137/326, 137/364, 285/179
International ClassificationB67D7/78
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/78
European ClassificationB67D7/78