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Publication numberUS2130743 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1938
Filing dateJul 10, 1936
Priority dateJul 10, 1936
Publication numberUS 2130743 A, US 2130743A, US-A-2130743, US2130743 A, US2130743A
InventorsParsons Alfred H
Original AssigneeParsons Alfred H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of applying facing material
US 2130743 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nSept. 20, 1938. A. H. PARSONS 2,130,743

METHOD oF Amman@4 FAcING Mmrsfmu.4

Filed July 10, 193e s sheets-sheet 1 r L H\ W AYA/ f q M f \Jl l Il l "n um HUI'.

./g/'red' JY. Parsons.

. IIU'I.

A ATTORNEY@ Mhfmf Sept. 20,1938. A. H. lPARSONS 2,130,743

mon oF APPLYING FAcING MATERIAL Filed July 1o, 1936 e sheets-Sheet v2 v INVENTOR .l l v BJ'QC E Parsons l ,LQ ATTORNEY 5 Sept. 20, 1938. A. H. PARSONS 2,130,743

METHOD OF APPLYING FACING MATERIAL Filed July 10, .1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVETOR .inl/red E Parsons ,94H7 M m L L; ATTORNEY:

A. H. PARSONS METHOD4 or.' APPLYING FACING MATERIAL .-sept. zo, 193s.

INVENTOR .HI/red H Parsons.

f- ATTORNEY.:

Sept. 20, 1938. A. H. PARsoNs METHOD OF APPLYING FACING MATERIAL Filed July 10, 1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 /faz A; ATTORNEY:

Patented Sept. 20, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates to improved methods of applying facing material to supporting structure. The present application is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 19,818, filed May 4, 1935, for Method of veneering.

Heretofore, facing material of Various` types has beenl applied to supporting structures, successfully, in only the conventional manner. That lit): is, in brick veneering and stone veneering it has been found necessary to use brick of ordinary dimensions or stone of proportionate thickness With the brick or stone bonded together in the usual fashion and `tied to the supporting struc- ]51 ture at intervals. Efforts have been made to utilize brick of less than usual dimensions but, so far as applicant is aware, such efforts` have failed. Moreover, in the application of tile and the like to supporting structures it has been customary to set the tile in a heavy supporting mass of cement, mortar, or the like, With the result that the tile is of necessity spaced some distance from the supporting structure. Since this arrangement does not permit ecient tying of 25, the tile to the supporting structure, the life of the assembly is materially shortened.

An object of the present invention is to `provide improved methods for applying facing material of various types to supporting structures.

340g A further object of the invention is to provide methods as set forth hereinbefore, wherein each unit of the facing material is more or less independently tied to the supporting structure.

In carrying out the foregoing and other obi jects of the invention, use is made of anchoring `means comprising primary anchoring devices and secondary anchoring devices. In the practice of the inventonthe primary anchoring devices are first secured to the supporting structure at predetermined spaced intervals, then the facing material is applied With the assistance of the secondary anchoring means to become firmly held to the supporting structure. During the application of the facing material use is made of mortar or other bonding material in the usual fashion. The facing material, made up usually,A

in the form of relatively thin units, has certain of the edges thereof provided with formations which cooperate With the anchoring means to hold the units to the supporting structure. In one form of the invention the facing units are made substantially in the form of brick of a thickness considerably less than that of conventional brick. Certain ofthe edges of these units can be provided with formations, either expre-formed composition. 0

In another form of the invention the units are in the general shape of usual ceramic tile and again such units have formations in certain of the edgesthereof to cooperate with the anchorl ing means. y

Other features, objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is an isometric view of the corner of a 20 building `showing brick veneering according to the present invention in various stages of application;

Fig. 2 is a` section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3- is a perspective view of a double-headed 25 nail adapted for use in the invention;

Fig. 4 is a perspective View of the Wire clips used in holding the` veneering brick;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of part of a metal piece used to secure the lower course of brick; 30

Fig. 6i is a perspective view partly in section of a modified form of brick;

Fig. '7 is a perspective partly in section illustrating an additional modification of brick structure; 35

, Fig.Y 8 is a View similar to Fig. 1 of a modication ofv the invention;

i Fig. 9yis an enlarged vertical section taken substantially on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig, 10 is an enlarged fragmentary form of a 4 0 part ofthe instrument used in predetermining the` position o-f the -primary anchoring means;

. Fig. 1l is-an enlarged perspective formed of a fragment of the upright employed in the instrument; V 45 Fig. 12 is a section taken substantially on the line I\2;I2 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a view of one of the secondary anchoring means utilized in the construction shown in Figs.` 8 and 9; 50

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary plan View showing the applicationv of the invention to the laying of tile;

Fig;l 15 is a section taken substantially on the line |5-l5 of Fig. 14; i

Fig. 1'6 isa view of one of the secondary anchor- 55 ing means utilized in the attaching of tile to supporting structures;

Fig. 17 is a perspective View of another modification of the invention;

Fig. 18 is an enlarged fragmentary plan View of the arrangement shown in Fig. 17;

Fig. 19 is a vertical section showing the manner of installation of the combined spacing and tie straps;

Fig. 20 is an enlarged end formed of the base of the structure shown in'Fig. 1'7; i

Fig. 21 is a perspective formed of one of the combined tie and spacing straps;

Fig. 22 isk a horizontal section showing the manner of application of certain units for corner construction. Y l

Referring to the drawings and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the reference character I0 indicates an improved facing unit or brick which is preferably formed with its exposed face having the same dimensions as the sideof a conventional brick. The brick is made relatively thin, the preferred thickness being about three-quarters of an inch. The rear face I2 ofthe brick is larger than the front face I I, and each side has a straight bevel as illustrated in Fig. 1. This brick is made of any preferred material, such as ordinary brick clay, and the face may be given any desired texture or design. The reduced volume of the brick will result in considerable savings in the cost of manufacturing and handling the y bricks.

As shown in Fig. 2, the parts of the building frame are arranged so that the outer surface of the sheathing is flush with the outer surface of the foundation. .After the Asheathing has been covered with tar paper, as the first step in applying the veneering, the courses of primary anchoring devices or nails that are to support the veneering bricks are driven into the sheathing. The nails I 3, which are of a well-known double-headed construction, have an o-uter head I4 and a lower head I5 spaced inwardly from the outer head. The nails are preferably formed of copper or some other rust-proof material. The first row of nails I6 is arranged parallel to the bottom edge of the sheathing and at a distance from said edge slightly greater than the width o-f the rear `face of a brick. The' nails of this row are spaced from each other such a distance that each whole brick will be supported. by two nails. With bricks having a face 8" X 2 the nails should be spaced about 3%," apart and the first nail should be about 21/2 from the corner of the building.

After the first horizontal row I6 of nails has been established the vertical row I1, which is the second row from the corner ofthe building, is next established. The vertical lines of the building framework are practically never perfectly plumb for any one of a number of reasons, and it is essential that the vertical rows of `nails be parallel to the lines of the building. A quick and efficient method of attaining this parallelism is found in the adjustable T-square I8 illustrated in Fig. 1. This adjustable square includes a horizontal foot llllong` enough to span three .nails with a centering notch formed infthe middle. A vertical leg 2|) is pivoted directly above thecenteringnotch and vany suitable means, such as a brace 2|, is provided for holding the parts-in adjusted position. The underY side of the vertical leg 2!) is provided with a plurality of proj ectingpoints 22 spaced the same distance apartfas the vdistance desired between horizontal rows of nails.

In adjusting thesquare for "thisparticular building, the horizontal foot is placed over the nails 23, 24 and 25 with the centering notch over nail 24. The distance from the center of nail 24 to the corner of the building is then measured and the vertical leg of the square is adjusted so that the center of the top point 22 is this same distance from the corner of the building. The brace 2| is then fastened and the square is maintained in this adjusted position while this wall of the building is being finished.

After the vertical leg 2i] hasbeen secured in proper angular relation, it is pressed against the vtar paper and the points 22 penetrate the paper and indent the sheathing, marking the positions for several nails ofthe vertical row Il.

The T-square I8 is then moved one space to the right, centering over nail 25, and the vertical leg is again pressed against the sheathing to 1ocate the next vertical row of nails. The course of procedure thus outlined is followed until the entire side of the building has been marked.

After a side of the building has been thus marked, or while the marking is still in progress, the nails I3 are driven into the marked holes until the heads I5 meet the sheathing. This marking and nailing is continued over the entire side walls that areto be sheathed before any of the bricks are 'put in position.

Before laying the lower course of bricks a foundation strip 2l (Fig. 5) is inserted between the sheathing and the foundation. This strip includes a body 28, the rear edge of which is provided with points 29 and upwardly extending attaching lugs 30. The forward edgeof the strip is bent upwardly and rolled over to form an inclined edge Stand a series of holes 32 are formed in the body 28. In applying the foundation strip the points 29 are inserted between the sheathing and the foundation, and the attaching lugs 3B are nailed to the face of the sheathing, so that the body of the strip forms a ledge projecting outwardly from the lowerv edge of the sheathing. Any suitable mortansuch as a cement mortar, is used to point the bricks, and before laying the lower bricks, a layer of this mortar is first placed on the top of the foundation strip. One of the bricks is then placed on top of the mortar, with the wide face of the brick against the sheathing, and is pressed downwardly into the mortar, the surplus mortar that passed out over the space 3i and-downwardly through holes 32 being subsequently removed.

The upper edge of the brick is now secured in place by slipping a secondary anchoring device or retaining clip 33 over each of the nails above the brick. These retaining clips can be of any desired construction that will give them a tapered shape and permit them to slide vertically under the `head of nail in orderV to adjust themselves to the position of the brick.

`The preferred form of retaining clip is formed from a single length of rust-resisting wire having a certain amount of resilience. The opposite ends of the wire are bent to form two trapezoidal frames which are disposed with their long sides parallel toy each other and spaced apart a distance slightly less than the diameter of the nail shank. The narrow sidesV are .farther apart and are connected by the central part of the wire 35. In fastening the clip in place the open side of the clip opposite the wire part35 is passed over the shank of the nail, the long sides of the trapezoidal framesbeing spread apart to resiliently grip the shank ofthe nail. The clip is of such height as to fit snugly between the head of the nail and the sheathing, and the sides of the trapezoidal frames are formed on an angle corresponding to the angle of bevel of the edges of the brick. As the clip is pushed down over the nail from the dotted line position 36 to Fig. 2 to the full line position, the sides of the clip closely engage the edge of the brick.

After the first course of brick has been laid and secured in position by the clips, a layer of mortar is laid along the top edge of that course.

In laying the second course of brick, a brick is first placed in `a tilted position with its lower inner edge in contact with the tarpaper, and this lower corner is then pushed downwardly along the tar paper to scrape the mortar down intothe joint between the two bricks. The upper edge of the brick is then pressed inwardly against the tar paper as shown by the arrow 37 of Fig. '2, and clips are engaged with the upper edge of the brick. The excess mortar that has been pressed the grooves 38 shown in Fig. '7.

out between this brick and the one below it is then cut off and the pointing is smoothed off as desired. It will be clear from Fig. 2 that the clip acts as a keystone-shaped wedge engaging the bevelled faces of the bricks to lock them securely in place.

Due to the fact that all nails are` driven before the laying of bricks commences, there is no hammering that might loosen or dislodge any of the mortar during the laying of the bricks.

After the motar sets it is permanently held in place by reason of its interlock with the wire clip. However, if desired, additional `means may be used to lock the mortar in place as, for example, Or the rear edges of the bricks may be formed with rearwardly formed bevels 39 shown in Fig. 6, the rear edges of the bricks being maintained intact between the bevels in order to locate the bricks on the nails.

The brickwork can be carried around the corner of the building by providing special angular shapes or by filling the corner with mortar in any desired manner.

The method of laying out the nails described above is used for regular course work. Wherever it is desired to lay the brick in herringbone or other fancy designs, special p-aper carrying a printed pattern can be placed on the building to guide in the location of the nails and bricks, and

while the invention has been described as applied' to give the appearance of ordinary brickwcrk, the size and shape of the veneering pieces can be altered as desired to imitate anynatural raw material or to express original ideas in wall finish.

It will be clear to those skilled in the art that this brick veneering can be applied by ordinary unskilled labor in a very expeditious manner. The resulting construction is such that each individual brick is attached directly to the sheathing and is supported by several nails. Should water seep through any of thejoints in the brickwork it will run down over the face 0f the tai' paper and will drop out in front of the foundation instead of being retained on top of the foundation to rot the sill, as is the case ofl ordinary veneer construction. Other advantages of the invention along the lines of economy and improved construction will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 8 and 9, use is made of facing units having edge formations somewhat different from the formation shown in the previous figures. In these latter figures, 4l!

I,indicates a building unit which may be of the same general size and dimensions as the brick previously described. However, the longitudinal edges of these units, instead of being bevelled, are provided with triangular-shaped grooves 4l, intermediate the front and rear surfaces thereof. The rear edges of the longitudinal expanses of the unit are rounded as shown at 42.

In the application of units, 'as shown in these figures to supporting structure, use is made of foundation strips 2l in general similar to those previously described; and primary anchoring means or double-headed nails I3 similar to those previously described. However, a different type of secondary anchoring means or wire clip is used. As shown in Fig. 13, this wire clip is made from a single length of wire shaped to have a loop portion 44 extending into upright expanses 45, slightly bowed at their extremities, such portions having parallel expanses 45 as continuations thereof, with the ends of these expanses turned back, as shown at 41 with the ends of the wire adjacent the ends of the loop 44.

Use also may be made of the instrument shown in Fig.v l for determining the positions of the primary anchoring means, or use may be made of the instrument shown in Figs. 8 and l0 to 12, inclusive. The latter instrument comprises a base bar 5@ to which is secured an arc-shaped member 5l. A portion of this arc-shaped member is provided with a slot 52 pivotally secured to the base bar 50. Midway between the ends of the member 5I is a bar 54. Bar 54 is provided longitudinally thereof with a number of spaced slots 55 for the accommodation of indicating means. a bolt-like member 55 having an enlarged disc head 5l terminating in a point 58. The other end of the member 56 is threaded for the reception of a nutV 58. The member 56 passes through one of the slots 55 with the head 51 resting against one surface of the bar 54 and with the nut 58 resting against the other surface of this bar. Since the slots 55 are of relatively considerable length, it follows that the indicating members secured to the bar in the various slots can be adjusted within limits to accommodate variations in size of facing units. The lower end of the bar 54 is provided with a notch 59 adapted to engage one of the primary anchoring means for proper alignment of the Vertical series of anchoring means. A bolt and nut arrangement 59 passing through the slot 52 and the bar 54 permits the bar 54 to be locked in any desired angular position, as shown in broken lines (Fig. 8).

The method of application of the facing units shown in Figs. 8 and 9 is substantially the same as that previously described, in that the primary anchoring members or nails I3 are rst driven into the sheathing of the supporting structure through the tar paper or other insulation. The desired positions of these nails may be determined by use of the instrument shown in Fig. 3. The various points 58 associated with this instrument when pressed into tar paper leave indications for the proper positions of the nails. With the foundation strip 2l in place, a layer of mortar is placed cn top of this strip and then the facing units or brick of the first course are pressed into the top of the layer of mortar until the units have become firmly set. In this position the top edges of the units are spaced some distance from the first horizontal row of nails I3. As each individual unit is placed in proper position, relative to the foundation strip, it is secured in place by the secondary anchoring means or clips shown in Fig. 13. Due to the construction of the clips and The indicating means comprises asfthe provision of the considerable space between the top of the units and the nails I3, the clips can be positioned with the loops 44 thereof resting directly on the nail adjacent the inner head thereof and with the parallel expanses of the clipson each side of the nail and under the outer head thereof. In this position as shown in Fig. 9 the tips of the bent-back portions 47 become firmly seated in the. triangular-shaped grooves 4I, extending longitudinally of the top edge of the units. After the first course of units has been laid with the proper spacing between the ends thereof and with the secondary anchoring means or clips in place, the next course of units can be laid. Prior to the application of any unit, however, a layer of mortar is applied to the top of the units in the first course; the amount of mortar being estimated to provide an excess beyond that needed. The units of the second course may then be placed in position, the lower edge of each unit being forced against the layer of -mortar until the bottom contacts with the upper part of the clips, in which position the upstanding part of the bends 45 protrude into the recess 4I in the lower edge of the unit. When properly positioned it will be seen that the lower edge of the unit rests against the loop 44 of a clip and, since this loop 44 is in direct contact with the nail I3, it follows that the unit is almost directly supported by the nail. As the unit is pressed downwardly until properly seated, the excess amount of mortar is extruded from between the adjacent units and such excess can be r-emoved and the joint pointed in the customary fashion. Successive courses of brick or units can be laid until the structure has been completed.

Figures 14 and 15 illustrate the manner in which the present invention can be used in the construction of tile walls and the like. In these figures, 66 indicates facing units or tiles of conventional dimensions and differing from conventional tilting only in that recesses 6I are provided in certain of the edges of the units, preferably in the longitudinal edges thereof. As shown in the drawings, each recess has an inwardly extending wall 62 substantially parallel with the faces of the unit, and with a bottom wall 64 of curvature approaching ogee form. This curved wall of the recess extends from the wall portion 62 to the opposite face of the unit. The secondary anchoring means or clips used in this construction are shown clearly in Fig. 16, wherein the clips indicated generally at 65 are made of a single strip of wire having a loop 66, legs El of partial ogee curvature forced into close proximity, and leading into loops 68 at right angles to the loop 6'I. The end portions of the wire are also of partial ogee curvature as shown at 69, and the ends of the wire are spaced from the loop 56.

In the practice of the present invention in connection with the construction of tile walls and the like, the same procedure is followed in the first stages as previously set forth, in that the primary anchoring means or nails are fastened to the supporting structure in the predetermined positions and, if desired, a foundation strip may be attached to the same structure. After the first course of units or tiles have been placed in position, the individual tiles may be locked to the supporting structure by the secondary anchoring means or clips. These clips are secured under the outer head of the various nails I3 with the outer head engaging the edges of the loops 68 and positioned substantially midway of the extremities of these loops. When so engaged with the nails the end portions 69 of the clips make good contact with the curved wall of the recess 6I. After the first course of tile has been properly positioned and the secondary anchoring means applied, mortar or cement may be placed in such quantity as to completely fill the upper recess of each unit and as to provide an excess. Tiles of the second course may then be applied by pressing the sam-e downwardly against the mortar or concrete until the grooved wall of the recess in the lower edge of each unit contacts with the curved expanses 61 of the clip. When such Contact has been made it will be found that the superimposed tiles are spaced apart a very slight amount as shown at 10, such space serving to receive the finishing cement or mortar. Any -excess of mortar from the union of recesses can be removed with a suitable thin tool to condition the joint 'I0 for the reception of the finishing material.

By this arrangement it will be apparent that the usual objections found to the conventional methods of applying tile are overcome. Instead. of depending upon a cement bond between the tile and the supporting structure, each tile is effectively anchored directly to the supporting structure.

In Figs. 17 to 20, inclusive, the use of the invention in connection with the construction of double walls has been shown. In these figures, usual sheathing or siding has been omitted since it is contemplated that the uprights alone will sufiice. Referring particularly to Fig. 17, 80 indicates the top of the foundation on which rests a sill SI having uprights 82 secured thereto. The uprights 82 are spaced apart any desired predetermined distance. i

The facing units especially adapted to be used in this. construction are of such length as to extend substantially from the mid-point of one upright to the mid-point of a second upright spaced from the first. By this arrangement it is possible to have the usual staggered arrangement of units. 'I'he units which are illustrated at 84 have their longitudinal edges provided with substantially triangular-shaped recesses 85. I'he exact form however of these recesses can be varied to meet various conditions. In conjunction with units of this character, use is made also of the same type of primary anchoring means or nails I3, and secondary anchoring means or clips B5 similar to those described in connection with Fig. 16. However, if the shape of the grooves in the facing units should be changed, other shapes of clips can be adapted to conform thereto.

In the installation of units, as shown in Figs. 17 to 20, the lower units are embedded in mortar placed directly on top of the foundation 80, with the rear faces of the units in contact with the sill 8l. The primary anchoring means I3 of course are secured to the uprights in pairs, as shown, prior to the laying of any unit. 'Ihe first course of units are laid in the usual manner, each unit being locked in place by the addition of a secondary anchoring means or clip engaging one of the nails I3 and having a portion of the clip seated in the proper 'groove 85 of the unit. Thev anchoring means are positioned on the uprights in pairs so that adjacent ends of units can be anchored respectively by the clips of each pair with the clips on an intermediate upright serving'to hold the intermediate portion of the unit in place. After the first course of units has been applied, mortar can be placed on top of the units rendering the first course ready for the reception of a second course.

This type of construction is particularly adapted for the construction of double walls and, accordingly, as shown in the drawings, such double wall construction can be made by adding courses both to the Youtside of the wall and to `angular portions 9| extending either upwardly or downwardly, as may be desired, and with a portion of the hooked parts 92 resting in the respective grooves 85. VAfter mortar has been placed, a second course of units can be laid with the result that the remaining -or opposite part of the hookportions 92 extend into the grooves in the bottom edges of the superimposed units. With this construction a unitary wall, double in character, results. The advantage residing in the use of the straps 9D is that the unitary character of the double wall isl maintained even though the utility of the uprights be impaired for any reason, such as dry rot and the like.

Unitary double walls of this character are adapted for use both as outer walls of building structures and also as inner walls. The units may be made of any desired material, such as stone, pre-formed compositions of concrete and the like, or other pre-formed composition material. The only requirement is that the units be of proper size, shape and configuration, particularly with respectto the provision of properly shaped recesses in the longitudinal edges. While the construction shown in Figs. 1'? to 20 deals primarily with double wall constructions it will be apparent that single wall constructions, omitting the straps eil, can be erected with equal facility. In the double wall construction however space between the two vertical walls serves as a good thermal insulation space and, if desired, thermal insulation material can be packed into such space.

Fig. 22 illustrates the manner in which substantially rounded corners can be procured in the practice of this invention. In this figure, |00 represents an upright vone corner of which is cut away as shown at lil i. Units |02 are secured to right angular faces lli@ of the upright by the anchoring means previously described in any desired manner, it being understood that the grooves in the edges of these units can be of configuration corresponding to that shown in any of the embodiments, or of any other desired configuration with the clips having shapes conformed thereto. In order that the space between the ends of the units m2 can be filled in and the construction given a somewhat rounded character, use may be made of units m5 which are of substantially truncated wedge shape. These units have grooves corresponding to those in the other units and are held in place by anchoring means in the same fashion. Mortar |36 of course is applied betweenthe respective ends of the units |92 and the vertical edges of the unit |05.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention in any phase thereof provides novel and .eicient methods for applying pre-formed facing materialto supporting structures. Brick veneer work canbe installed at greatly reduced cost relative to the cost of conventional type of brick veneering, Skilled labor is not required in l the practice of the methods set forth herein since, if proper steps are followed, these methods can be practiced with ease. The installation of tile in walls and the like can be accomplished at greatly reduced cost and the resulting structure is more durable than structures erected in conventional manners.l Moreover, as pointed out hereinbefore, unitary doublewall constructions can be erected with a minimum of labor and expense.

The term units as, used herein is to be construed as covering preformed blocks of any desired composition, such as clay products, concrete, ceramic material, glass, vand any other composition that lends itself to use in building construction.

It is' to be understood that the invention can be modified beyond the illustrated embodments in view of which any limitations imposed thereupon are to be such only as are set forth in the following claims. i

I claim: ,i

l. The process of laying a veneer over a frame building which comprises driving nails into the sheathing of the building atpr-edetermined intervals, laying pieces of veneering material between the nails, securing the said pieces by clips, and covering the clips with mortarA placed in the joints between the said pieces.

2. The process of laying a brick veneering over a frame building which comprises driving nails into the sheathing of the building in rows at predetermined intervals, thereafter laying veneering bricks between the nails, securing the bricks by clips engaged with the nails, and covering the clips with mortar placed in the joints between the bricks.

3. The process of laying a brick veneering over a frame building which comprises inserting rows of nails in the sheathing of said building in parallel horizontal and vertical rows, the nails being spaced from each other distances appropriate for cooperation with veneering bricks, thereafter laying veneering bricks between the nails, securing the bricks by clips engaged with the nails, and covering the clips with mortar placed in the joints between the bricks.

4. The process of laying a veneer over a frame building which comprises covering the frame with sheathing boards, covering the boards with sheet material, driving nails into the sheathing at spaced intervals, laying pieces of veneering material between the nails, securing the said pieces by clips, and covering the clips with mortar placed in the joints between the said pieces.

5. The method of app-lying pre-formed facing units to supporting structure, which comprises securing primary anchoring devices to said supporting structure at predetermined intervals, laying said units between primary anchoring devices, locking said units to said supporting structure by secondary anchoring devices engaging formations in said units and by bonding material between adjacent edges of adjacent units.

'7. The method of applying pre-formed facing.

units to supporting structure, which comprises securing nails to said supporting structure at predetermined intervals, laying an initial course of said units between a foundation and certain of said nails with bonding material between the adjacent ends of said units, locking said units to said supporting structure by clips engaging theing said tiles to said supporting structure by.

secondary anchoring devices partially engaging said primary anchoring devices and partially tting in said grooves and by bonding material interposed between adjacent edges of adjacent tiles to ll adjacent grooves thereof with relatively narrow spaces between the ungrooved edge portions of said tiles.

9. The method of applying tiles having grooves in certain of the edges thereof to supporting structure, which comprises securing nails to said supporting structure at predetermined intervals, laying said tiles between said nails, and locking said tiles to said supporting structure by clips partially engaging said nails, partially fitting in said grooves and by bonding material interposed between adjacent edges of adjacent tiles to ll adjacent grooves thereof with relatively narrow spaces Vbetween the ungrooved edge portions of said tiles.

10. The method of applying pre-formed facing units to spaced upright supporting members, which comprises securing primary anchoring devices to said upright supporting members at spaced intervals, laying initial courses of said units upon a foundation and on each side of said supporting members, locking said units to said supporting members b-y clips engaging the nails and cooperating formations in the units and by bonding material,v inserting spacing straps between the units of the respective courses to be embedded in said bonding material, and superimposing additional courses upon the initial courses.

` ALFRED H. PARSONS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3106751 *Dec 16, 1955Oct 15, 1963Dow Chemical CoInsulated wall structure
US3657854 *Oct 16, 1970Apr 25, 1972Seating Co Of America IncModular stadium seating and method of installing same
US4391067 *Apr 14, 1980Jul 5, 1983Frontier Homes, Inc.Log wall construction for log home
US5263260 *Aug 3, 1992Nov 23, 1993Smith Lee RTile leveler and method
US5855075 *Mar 5, 1997Jan 5, 1999Digiovanni; RobertBrick-laying template
US5894676 *Apr 2, 1997Apr 20, 1999Digiovanni; RobertBrick laying template
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/741.41, 33/518, 52/747.13, 52/391, 52/747.11
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0846
European ClassificationE04F13/08B3A6