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Publication numberUS2132032 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 4, 1938
Filing dateNov 10, 1936
Priority dateJul 8, 1936
Publication numberUS 2132032 A, US 2132032A, US-A-2132032, US2132032 A, US2132032A
InventorsAlex Jacobsen Aage
Original AssigneeAlex Jacobsen Aage
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Partition wall
US 2132032 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. A. JACOBSEN PARTITION WALL Oct. 4, 1938.

Original Filed Nov. 10, 1936 Patented Oct. 4, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PARTITION WALL Aage Alex Jacobsen, Copenhagen, Denmark Application November 10 Renewed February 26, 8, 1936 Claims.

The present invention relates to partition walls, especially light sound-insulating partition walls.

The invention has for its object to provide a new and improved partition wall combining great 5 lightness with a high insulating power.

A further object of the invention is to provide a wall of this kind that is easy and cheap to build, and easily can be erected and connected to the ceiling and floor in the rooms in which it is to be placed.

The two principal forms of sound are air sound, which is propagated by oscillations in the air, and body sound which is propagated as oscillations in solid bodies. Body sounds may further occur as rapping sounds, conduction sounds or as vibrations. Out of these sound forms generally only air sounds can be heard directly, while body sounds will easily be converted into air sounds and, as such, be propagated to the ear.

The sound-insulating properties of a partition are mainly contingent on the air-tightness of the partition and of the ability of the wall to weaken the conduction sound. Air sound finds its way through the smallest fissures. When air waves hit a wall, a part of the air sound will be converted into conduction sound, which is partly ab sorbed and partly converted into air sound at the opposite wall surface. In the room in which the sound is generated, the air particles will also actuate the partition dynamically, in such a manner that the wall acts as a membrane, so that the air sound on one side of the wall will produce air sound at'the other side of the wall. This membrane effect decreases with the increasing lateral 5 stiffness and increasing weight of the wall.

In order to provide a partition wall combining great lightness with a high sound-insulating power, the partition wall according to the invention is built in such a manner that it consists of 40 two outer plates and a central plate placed between the latter with intermediate spaces and fitted with bracing members so as to obtain lateral stiffness, the said central plate being connected to the two outer plates by means of connecting units that are mutually separated by sound-insulating intermediate layers. Hereby the advantage is attained that the outer plates, in combination with the central plate, to a great extent impede the direct passage of air sound, because the latter has to pass through three plates between which there are spaces filled, perhaps wholly or partly with sound-absorbing material. Further, the passage of conduction sound, or the conversion of the same into air sound at the outer plates, will be impeded in that the conduction 1936, Serial No. 110,027. 1938. In Denmark July sound in one outer plate, in order to reach the other outer plate, has to pass the connecting members between the outer plates and the central plate, which connecting members, as mentioned above, are mutually separated by soundinsulating intermediate members, i. e. members of plastic nature in which the sound energy is partly annihilated.

It is especially suitable to produce the central plate by building the same from laterally stiff sections which preferably should be joined in such a manner, with the use of sound-insulating interposed layers, that body sounds cannot easily pass from one section to the other one.

The invention is illustrated by way of example on the drawing in Figs. 1 and 2, in two constructions in horizontal section. The invention, however, is not limited to the constructions shown on the drawing.

The invention is rendered practicable partly by dividing the partition into two outer plates I, 2 and a central Part 3, each of which is as impermeable to sound as possible, and partly by making the central part 3 from laterally stiff sections 4, s, s in Fig. 1 and 1, a, s in Fig. 2, insulated from one another in oscillatory respect by intermediate layers oi plastic strips Ill, and partly by attaching the outer plates of each side, to every other one (4, 6 in Fig. 1 and 1, 9 in Fig. 2) or to still fewer of the sections of the central part, in

such a manner that one of the outer plates does not come into direct contact with the sections to which the other outer plate is attached, or vice versa.

In Fig. 1, the central part 3 is made alternately from H-shaped sections 5 and T-shaped sections 4 and 6. The stems of the last mentioned sections point alternately to the right and left of the longitudinal direction of the partition, and they support the. outer plates I and 2 which are nailed or screwed to the free vertical edges of the stems, as shown at H.

In Fig. 2, the central part 3 is made alternately from symmetrical T-shaped sections 8 and unsymmetrical T-shaped sections 1 and 9. The flanges of the last mentioned sections are displaced alternately to the right and to the left side of the longitudinal direction of the partition, and they support there the outer plates I and 2 which are nailed or screwed to the projecting vertical edges of the flanges.

In the flanges of the H-shaped profiles shown in Fig. 1, as well as in the flanges of all the T- shaped sections shown in Fig. 2, vertical suitably deep and wide grooves are cut, and these grooves are engaged by the. adjacent sections.

The intermediate layers Ill are formed by strips of plastic material to inch thick and consisting, for instance of lead, asphalt felt, wax felt produced in one of the outer plates I of the parti- I tion must pass one or more of the plastic members i 9 in which nearly the entire oscillation energy is consumed in doing plastic deformation.

work. The outer plates as well as the central part must also be insulated from the adjoining walls, ceiling and floor by means of plastic inter- 1 mediate layers similar to those mentioned above,

because without these layers the conduction sound may escape by these ways.

1 Allzthe sections of the centralipart may be pro.- duced from artificial materialsor from dry fulledged boards; Where the boards are nailed, strips of flooring pasteboard, felt, lead or the like should previously be inserted for the sake oitightness. In both figures,the sections aresupposed to; be produced from boards 4 inches wide andl inch thick. The stems of the T-shaped sections in Fig. 1 are also supposed to be. made from such boards split lengthwise. I

The outer plates! and .2 may be produced in a'manner known per se, for instance from building plates or, from 4 by inch rough boards and plaster i2. Inside of theplaster-supporting boards, 3, a layer of suitable material as shown'at I4 is first applied, partlyin order to increase the tightness, and partly in order to prevent the mortar deposited from penetrating between and behind the plaster-supporting boards and, thereby, from coming into contact with the insulated sections in the central part, whereby sound bridges might be produced. In the cavities between the outerplates and the central part, sound-absorbing substances may be inserted. Without deviation from the characteristic principle underlying the invention, the central part 3 may also be made from sections of other shapes than those shown in the figures' Considering,

in Fig. l, the stems of the T-shaped sections as connections, the system will be similar to the cantilever principle.

tral plate are not in direct contact with the outer plates.

2. A partition wall consisting of two outer plates and a central member disposed between the latter with intermediate spaces and composed of laterally stifi sections mutually sound-insulated by means ofintermediate layers of plastic strips, each of said sections consisting alternately of an H-shaped and a T-shapad part joined together, the T-shaped parts contacting the outer plates. I

3.- A partition wall consisting of two outer plates and a central member disposed between the latter with intermediate spaces and composed of laterally stiff sections mutually sound-insulated by means of intermediate layers of plastic strips, each of said sections consisting alternately of an H-shaped and a T-shaped part joined together,,the stems of the T-shaped parts pointing alternately to the right and left of the central member, and being connected to the outer plates, respectively.

4. A partition wall consisting of two outer plates and a central member disposed between the latter with intermediate spaces and composed of laterally stiff sections mutually soundinsulated by means of intermediate layers of plastic-strips, some of said sectionsbeing of an H-shaped form, and the rest of said sections of T-shaped form, the latter beingadapted to alternately contact each of the two outer plates.

5. A partition wall consisting of two outer;

plates and a central member disposed between the latter with intermediate spaces and com posed of laterally stiff sections mutually soundinsulated by means of intermediate layers of plastic strips, some of said sections being of a. symmetrical T-shaped form, and the rest of said sections of an unsymmetrical T-shaped. form, the latter being alternately arranged with respect to the former and adapted to alternately contact each of the two outer plates, respectively.

'AAGE ALEX JACOBSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2872710 *Aug 5, 1954Feb 10, 1959Cox Henry CConstruction panel providing sound and heat insulation
US3084402 *Nov 17, 1958Apr 9, 1963Mosaic Tile CompanyAcoustical panel
US3091441 *Feb 2, 1961May 28, 1963Blaw Knox CoApparatus for heating and stretching of fabrics
US3305993 *Jun 10, 1964Feb 28, 1967United States Gypsum CoSound control wall construction
US5297369 *May 5, 1993Mar 29, 1994Dickinson Sydney LBuilding structure with improved soundproofing characteristics
US5984044 *Jul 31, 1998Nov 16, 1999Christensen; Arthur E.Acoustical barrier wall with protective sleeves and method of assembly
US6158178 *May 30, 1997Dec 12, 2000Steelcase Inc.Panel wall construction
US6189270 *Mar 2, 1999Feb 20, 2001Steelcase Development Inc.Panel wall construction
US6209273Mar 2, 1999Apr 3, 2001Steelcase Development Inc.Panel wall construction
US6250029Sep 27, 1999Jun 26, 2001Steelcase Development Inc.Panel wall construction
US7127856Jun 4, 2004Oct 31, 2006Hans T. Hagen, Jr.Insulated stud panel and method of making such
US7168216Dec 3, 2004Jan 30, 2007Hans T. Hagen, Jr.Insulated stud panel and method of making such
US7574837Mar 30, 2006Aug 18, 2009Hans T. Hagen, Jr.Insulated stud panel and method of making such
US20050188649 *Dec 3, 2004Sep 1, 2005Hans T. Hagen, Jr.Insulated stud panel and mehod of making such
WO2011089340A1 *Jan 19, 2011Jul 28, 2011Guy DiemunschPre-manufactured device enabling creation of a construction element, and construction element including at least two such devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/290, 52/481.1, 52/238.1, 52/783.1, 52/144
International ClassificationE04B2/74
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/7409
European ClassificationE04B2/74C2