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Publication numberUS2132661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1938
Filing dateNov 29, 1935
Priority dateNov 29, 1935
Publication numberUS 2132661 A, US 2132661A, US-A-2132661, US2132661 A, US2132661A
InventorsTemple John C
Original AssigneeTemple John C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surfacing machine
US 2132661 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1938.

J. C. TEMPLE SURFACING MACHINE Filed Nov. 29, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR ATTORNEYS WITNESS:

Oct. 11, 1938. J. c. TEMPLE SURFACING MACHINE Filed Nov. 29, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 ii mmiiiiil llhlllmll /8 L/o/m/ C f/WFLE INVENTOR BY f WITNES S1 ATTORNEYS.

Oct. 11, 1938. J. c. TEMPLE SURFACING MACHINE Filed Nov. 29, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet s FTC-7 C5.

III. I llr t INVENTQR r/ ATTORNEYS.

V X JOHN (3. 75/ 4/ 1. .6.

Patented Oct. 11,1938

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 7 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in surfacing machines for cleaning, brushing, scaling, or painting of metallic surfaces.

This invention like that set forth in my copending application Serial No. 46,995, filed October 28, 1935, has for its primary object the provision of a machine which utilizes electro-magnetic force for its support when the machine is in use for travel over vertical, or inclined surfaces for the cleaning, brushing, scaling, or painting of metallic surfaces, such as the sides of a sheet metal building, metal roofs, metal storage tanks, ships hulls, and other like metallic structures.

An important object of this invention resides in a self contained, self motivated and remotely controlled surface treating machine involving the unique feature of combining mechanical principles for performing useful work, and simultaneously moving itself over metallic surfaces to which it is kept in continuous contact by means of electro-magnets attached to and forming a component part of the machine, and holding the machine to its work without interfering with its complete mobility.

This invention unlike that shown in my 00- pending application is constructed on the caterpillar traction principle to provide a maximum magnetic tread contact between the machine and the metallic surface over which it is adapted to move.

Another feature of the invention resides in a caterpillar propelling mechanism wherein only those magnetic shoe treads which are in working contact with the metallic surface are energized, thus providing a rest period for the magnetized shoe treads as the same successively move into operative engagement with the metallic surface being worked upon.

Another feature of the invention is to provide a means for remotely and selectively controlling the operation of the machine and for obtaining flexibility in the guiding of the machine when in use.

A still further object is the provision of a machine having an electro-magnetic caterpillar propelling mechanism in which the magnetic shoe treads are air cooled to permit of the use of a maximum magnetic force without the danger of overheating.

With these and other objects in view, the invention resides in the certain novel construction,

1 combination and arrangement of parts, the

essential features of which are hereinafter fully described in the following specification, are particularly pointed out in the appended claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view of the machine with parts broken away.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view.

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view on the line 33 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is an enlarged vertical transverse sec tional view on the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a vertical transverse sectional view on the line 5-5 of Figure 1.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view on the line 6-6 of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view on the line of. Figure 1.

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic view showing the electrical circuits.

Referring to the drawings by reference characters, the numeral Ill designates a rectangular shaped chassis which includes a pair of spaced parallel channel side rails ll--ll and fixedly mounted in the side rails thereof are spaced transversely extending rods [2-42. The rods l 2-l2 serve to brace the chassis frame and serve as an axes for supporting certain rotatable mechanism presently to be described. Also extending transversely of the chassis frame adjacent the extreme ends of the rails ll--I| and journaled in bearings therein, are rotatable shafts l3l3, one of which has a rotatable surface scraping member ll mounted thereon, whereas the other shaft l3 carries a surfacing element in the form of a rotary brush member l5. Whereas I have shown in the drawings the machine as being equipped with a rotary scraping member and a rotary brush member, it will be understood that these members may be interchangeable and a rotary painting member similar to that shown in the above mentioned application may be similarly used in this machine. Semi-circular shaped hood shields l6 enclose the respective work surfacing members.

Associated with the chassis l0 and disposed within the side rails I l-ll thereof, are two parallel caterpillar traction devices A and B which are identical in construction so that a description of one will suffice for the other. The caterpillar traction devices A and B are driven from a single motor H, the armature shaft of which extends beyond opposite sides of the motor, and each end carries a pinion gear l8, the gears l8 respectively imparting power to the caterpillar traction devices A and B in the manner now to be explained.

Each caterpillar traction'device includes a pair oi sprocket disks l9-I9 which are fixed to a otally connected links which pass around the spaced sprockets l9'l9 carried by the rods I2-l2 and pivotally supported by the link chains of the endless carrier are closely spaced magnetic shoes 22. The pivotal axes of the shoes 22 which are in the form of pins are designated by the numeral 23 and they extend through certain of links of the endless carrier member and seat in semi-circular shaped notches 24 provided in the sprocket disks l9 during passage of the endless carrier around the respective sprockets. For the purpose of guiding the flexible endless carrier 2| during its movement, spaced tracks in the form of elongated plates 25 are provided, and the pins 23 carry rollers 26 for engagement with the respective tracks. It will of course be understood that the tracks 25 are rounded at their respective ends to conform to the circular path taken by the endless carrier as it moves around the supporting sprockets.

Each of the caterpillar traction devices as previously mentioned is driven from the motor I! and this driving mechanism includes a ring gear 21 fixedly connected to one of the sprocket disks I9 of the caterpillar traction device driven thereby. Journaled in a bearing 28 and extending transversely of the machine, is a counter-shaft 29 which carries at one end a pinion gear 30 which is in constant mesh with the ring gear 21. Spiined to the countershaft 29 is a sleeve 3| carrying a pair of reversely arranged bevel pinion gears 32 for selective meshing engagement with the pinion gear l8. The splined sleeve is under the influence of a solenoid 33 which when energized causes the splined sleeve 3| to be moved to cause one of the gears 32 to mesh with the pinion l8, and when the solenoid is deenergized, a spring 34 surrounding the counter-shaft and interposed between one of the pinions 32 and an adjacent portion of the bearing 28, serves to move the splined sleeve in an opposite direction to cause the other gear 32 to be brought into meshing engagement with the pinion I8. By the alternate shifting of the gears 32 into engagement'with the pinion 18, it will be readily understood that the driven shaft 29 may be turned in either direction and by placing the solenoid 33 under the control of an operator, the shifting of these gears may be remotely controlled as shown in Figure 8 and as will be presently explained.

Each electro-magnetic shoe 22 includes an electro-magnet having a rectangular shaped body 35 within which is arranged the north and south poles 36, the same being suitably insulated from the body 35. The electro-magnet also includes plates 31 which are connected with the respec tive poles 36 and are in contacting engagement with a metallic tread plate 38. The poles 36 include contact buttons 39 which respectively engage parallel conductor rails 40. The conductor rails 40 are joined by yokes 4| adjacent their opposite ends and the said yokes are pivotally connected to levers 42 turnably mounted upon transversely disposed shafts 43 fixedly mounted in the spaced guide track plates 25.

The ends of the conductor rails 40 are curved inwardly as at 44 and the rails are of such length as to permit of contact of the magnetic shoes therewith just prior to their movement into position with a contacting metallic surface and to break contact with the rails as the shoes move successively to a position out of contact with a metallic work surface. In view of the fact that the machine operates either up or down or back and forth without turning the same, it is necessary to shift the rails 40 to perform the function above mentioned. For this purpose, the conductor rails of each caterpillar traction device are under the influence of a solenoid 45, the same being operatively connected with one of the levers 42. In Figure 5 the solenoid 45 is shown as energized and has moved the conductor rails upwardly as the machine is traveling upwardly in the direction of the arrow but upon deenergizing of the solenoid 45, a spring 46 acts upon the lever 42 to move the rails in an opposite direction. The movement of the rails in opposite directions is limited by stop pins 41 disposed in the path of the levers 42. It will thus be seen by the energizing and deenergizing of the solenoid 45, the position of the conductor rails may be placed under the selective control of an operator located at a remote point, and the solenoid 45 associated wtih the rails of one of the caterpillar traction devices is arranged in series and in the same circuit with the solenoid 33 controlling the direction of drive imparted to the other caterpillar traction device.

For the purpose of air cooling the electro-magnetic shoes, I associate with each caterpillar traction device, a motor driven fan 41, the motor 48 thereof being mounted upon a platform 49 supported by a side rail H. The blades of the fan are disposed within an opening 56 arranged in an outer track plate 25 as best seen in Figure '7 of the drawings, and during operation, a blast of air is directed inwardly between the shoes carried by both leads of the endless carrier.

For the purpose of imparting rotary movement to the work surfacing devices i4 and I5, the shafts I 3l3 at one side of the chassis are provided with sprockets 5|, and passing over the sprockets and disposed within the side channel rail II is an endless sprocket chain 52, the same being placed under tension to take up slack by an idler sprocket 53 journaled in the side rail and disposed approximately midway between the shafts I3l3. Extending from the side channel rails llll are bearings 54 in which a transversely disposed shaft 55 is journaled. The shaft 55 carries a gear 56 which is in meshing engagement with one of the pinion gears 30 whereby power is transmitted from the motor IT, to the shaft 29, gear 3!], gear 56, to the shaft 55. Carried adjacent one end of the shaft 55 is a sprocket wheel 51 over which an endless sprocket chain 58 passes, the said chain also passing around a smaller sprocket 59 carried by one of the shafts I3. By the construction just described, one of the shafts I3 is operatively connected to the driven shaft 55 whereas the other shaft I3 receives its power through the sprocket chain 52 and sprocket wheels 5|.

In Figure 8 of the drawings, I have illustrated a diagrammatic view of the electrical wiring system by which I am enabled to remotely control the operation of the machine during its use. In this view the motor control circuit V is controlled by the actuation of a switch 60 and arranged in the circuit V is the motor l1 and the fan motors 48. It will thus be seen that when the switch 60 is closed as shown in the drawings. the motors I1 and 48 will be placed in operation. The sets of rails 40 of the caterpillar traction devices A and B are arranged in an electric circuit X controlled by a switch 62 and by closing of said switch, current will be supplied to the sets of rails 40 which are bridged by the tread plates 38 through the contact buttons 39.

Control circuits Y and Z are substantially identical and both include a control switch 6| in the circuit, the conductor rail controlling solenoid 45 of one of the caterpillar traction devices, and the solenoid 33 of the other solenoid traction device. By the operation of the control switches 60 and 62, the machine may be placed in condition for operation and by the selective control of the switches 6|, the caterpillar traction devices may be operated simultaneously in the same direction or simultaneously in opposite directions in order to provide flexibility for guiding the machine over a surface being worked upon.

During operation of the machine, it will be understood that the electro-magnetic force set up by the magnetic shoes will serve to support the machine in a vertical or inclined position upon the metallic surface being worked against the force of gravity, the flat magnetized tread plates 38 flatly engaging such metallic surface. By reference to Figure 5, it will be seen that at least three magnetic shoes are at all times in contact with the metallic surface, the magnetic force of which is suflicierit to cause the machine to be supported in operating position. By reason of the selective control of the two caterpillar traction devices, it is possible to selectively move the machine up or down, or back and forth, or to turn the same within its length by the operation of one of the caterpillar traction devices in one direction and reversing the direction of operation of the other caterpillar traction device. During operation of the machine, it will be seen that the work surfacing devices I4 and I5 contact the surface being worked upon for either scraping and brushing the same as shown in the drawings, or by the substitution of a paint brush attachment which might be used in lieu thereof.

Whereas I have shown and described what I consider to be the most practical embodiment of my invention, I wish it to be understood that such changes and alterations as come within the scope of the appended claims may be resorted to when desired.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:-

1. A machine for use upon vertical or inclined metallic surfaces comprising in, combination, a chassis, two separate magnetic caterpillar traction devices arranged in spaced parallel relation, an electric motor mounted on said chassis, individual driving means operable by said motor for operating the respective magnetic caterpillar traction devices in either direction, and means for selectively controlling the direction of operation of the individual driving means to facilitate the guiding of the machine over a metallic surface over which it is adapted to travel.

2. In a machine of the class described, a chassis, a magnetic caterpillar traction device including spaced rotatable sprockets, an endless flexible carrier passing over said sprockets, electro-magnetic traction shoes flexibly connected to said endless carrier, the shoes extending along one lead of said endless carrier adapted to have their outer sides operatively contact a metallic surface, a pair of spaced fixed conductor rails carried by said chassis and extending parallel to and inwardly of the above mentioned lead on said endless carrier, and pairs of pick up contacts on the inner sides of said shoes for wiping engagement with the respective conductor rails.

3. In a machine of the character described, a chassis, a magnetic caterpillar traction device for said chassis including a driven endless carrier, a plurality of magnetic shoes mounted on said endless carrier, means for electrically energizing the magnetic shoes as they engage a metallic surface with which they are adapted to frictionally contact, and a motor driven fan disposed adjacent one side of said endless carrier for directing a current of air inwardly over said magnetic shoes for cooling the same during operation.

4. A surfacing machine for use upon metallic surfaces comprising in combination, a chassis, electro-magnetic traction means for said chassis including two spaced parallel magnetic caterpillar devices mounted on said chassis, means for simultaneously energizing both of said magnetic caterpillar devices, means for driving said magnetic caterpillar devices in forward or reverse directions, a pair of rotatable surface work devices journaled transversely in said chassis and disposed respectively at opposite ends of said chassis, and means for simultaneously rotating said surface working devices in either direction.

5. In a machine of the class described, a chassis, a magnetic caterpillar traction device including spaced rotatable sprockets, means for selectively rotating said sprockets in opposite directions, an endless flexible carrier passing over said sprockets, electro-magnetic traction shoes flexibly connected to said endless carrier, the shoes extending along one lead of said endless carrier adapted to have their outer sides operatively contact a metallic surface, a set of spaced conductor rails supported by said chassis and movable relative thereto for a limited longitudinal movement, said rail being disposed inwardly of the above mentioned lead of said endless carrier and parallel thereto, pairs of pick up contacts on the inner sides of said shoes for wiping engagement with the respective conductor rails, and

means for shifting said conductor rails longitudinally in accordance with the selected direction of rotation of said sprockets to cause a magnetic shoe which is about to enter the active lead of the carrier to engage said conductor rails and to cause a shoe leaving said lead to break free of said conductor rail just prior to its disengagement with a metallic surface.

6. In a machine of the class described, a chassis, a magnetic caterpillar traction device for said chassis including a driven endless carrier, a plurality of electro-magnetic shoes mounted on said endless carrier, and fan means for directing cooling air between the leads of said endless carrier for cooling said electro-magnetic shoes to prevent overheating of the same during operation of the machine.

7. A machine for use upon vertical or inclined metallic surfaces comprising in combination, a chassis, two separate magnetic traction devices arranged in parallel relation, a power unit mounted on said chassis, individual driving means operable by said power unit for operating the respective magnetic traction devices in either direction, and means for selectively controlling the direction of operation of the individual driving means to facilitate the guiding of the machine over a metallic surface over which the machine is adapted to travel.

JOHN C. TEMPLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2618889 *Mar 1, 1949Nov 25, 1952Wigal Voorhis FClimbing toy
US2624151 *May 10, 1949Jan 6, 1953Wigal Voorhis FMagnetic descending toy
US2854825 *Apr 19, 1954Oct 7, 1958Shell DevMagnetic jetting device
US3147143 *Dec 19, 1961Sep 1, 1964Eiichi KontaniApparatus for painting, scale removing, traction and so on for massive bodies made of iron plates
US3409854 *May 12, 1966Nov 5, 1968Swallert Sven ArildDevice for moving a working apparatus on a support surface
US3682265 *May 13, 1970Aug 8, 1972Hitachi Metals LtdMagnet vehicle
US3777834 *Feb 10, 1972Dec 11, 1973Hitachi Metals LtdMagnet vehicle
US3973711 *Mar 6, 1974Aug 10, 1976Compagnia Italiana Montaggi IndustrialiMagnetic crawler vehicle for soldering apparatus
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US4258500 *Aug 1, 1978Mar 31, 1981Curry AndersonMoving toy
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US5363935 *May 14, 1993Nov 15, 1994Carnegie Mellon UniversityReconfigurable mobile vehicle with magnetic tracks
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US8342281May 10, 2010Jan 1, 2013Raytheon CompanyHull robot steering system
US8386112May 17, 2010Feb 26, 2013Raytheon CompanyVessel hull robot navigation subsystem
US8393286Sep 18, 2009Mar 12, 2013Raytheon CompanyHull robot garage
US8393421Oct 14, 2009Mar 12, 2013Raytheon CompanyHull robot drive system
US20140144715 *Nov 26, 2012May 29, 2014QinetiQ North America, Inc.Magnet robot crawler
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Classifications
U.S. Classification180/6.66, 305/185, 74/664, 114/222, 192/21, 180/6.7, 15/52.1, 29/81.5
International ClassificationB62D57/00, B63B59/00, B63B59/10
Cooperative ClassificationB63B59/10, B62D57/00
European ClassificationB63B59/10, B62D57/00