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Publication numberUS2132690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1938
Filing dateJun 3, 1937
Priority dateJun 3, 1937
Publication numberUS 2132690 A, US 2132690A, US-A-2132690, US2132690 A, US2132690A
InventorsHilliard Perley A
Original AssigneeHilliard Perley A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Edible material in ribbon form
US 2132690 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1938. P. A. HlLLlARD EDIBLE MATERIAL IN RIBBON FORM Fild June 5, 1957 lnvenfor. Parley A.Hil|ic1rd WW W Aflys. I

Patented Oct. 11, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFiCE 7 Claims.

This invention relates to edible material in ribbon form, of which ribbon candy is an example, although the invention is equally applicable to the manufacture of edible material 5 such as crackers, cookies or the like.

Ribbon candy as now manufactured is quite fragile especially if the ribbon is relatively thin, and this makes it difficult to ship ribbon candy without breakage. In fact, manufacturers of ribbon candy do not usually expect to ship their candy any distance but instead usually plan to dispose of their ribbon candy locally.

It is one of the objects of my present invention to provide candy or other edible material 15 in ribbon form, which is constructed so that the ribbon-shaped edible material can be safely packed and shipped without any special danger of breakage. In making my ribbon candy the candy material is rolled or spun out into the flat ribbon form as usual and then this ribbon is crimped to give the ribbon candy effect by forming therein folds which extend transversely of the ribbon, each fold being deeper at one edge of the ribbon than at the other. These folds, each of which has a progressively varying depth from one edge to the other ofthe ribbon, are arranged so that some of the folds have their deepest portion at one edge of the ribbon and the other folds have their deepest portions at the 30 opposite edge of the ribbon. The folds are so made that two lengths of the ribbon candy embodying the invention can be nested together, and

by placing a soft separating sheet of paper between the nesting layers it is possible to pack 35 and ship the candy without any special danger of breakage.

In order to give an understanding of the invention I have illustrated in the drawing a selected embodiment thereof which will now be described after which the novel features will be pointed out in the appended claims In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a strip of ribbon candy embodying my in- 4 vention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a portion of the ribbon turned upside down from the position shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an edge view of a section of the ribbon candy;

Fig. 4 is a fragmnetary view showing how different strips of the ribbon candy may be nested together for packing;

Fig. 5 illustrates a box having the strips of ribbon candy packed therein;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view showing how the separating sheets serve to hold adjacent tiers of nested candy separated when the candy is packed in a box.

As stated above my invention is applicable not only to the manufacture of ribbon candy but also to the manufacture of other edible material such as cracker material or cookie material in ribbon form. For convenience, however, I will refer to the invention as applied to the making of ribbon candy, although I wish it understood that the reference herein to ribbon candy is not intended to limit the invention to the manufacture of candy or confection.

In making ribbon candy embodying the invention the candy material. will first be rolled or spun out into fiat ribbon form as usual and then the ribbon will be crimped transversely of its length so as to form folds 2, 3 extending transversely of the length of the ribbon. Each fold has a general U shape in cross section with the side walls of the fold converging toward each other in the direction of the bend of the U, and each fold is made deeper at one end than at the other so that each fold has a progressively varying depth from one edge of the'ribbon to the other.

The various folds in the ribbon are so disposed that some of the folds, as, for instance, the folds 2, have their deeper portions 4 at one edge 5 of the ribbon and their shallowest portions 6 at the other edge I of the ribbon, while other folds, as, for instance, the folds 3, have their deeper portions 4 at the edge of the ribbon and their shallowest portions 6 at the edge 5 of the ribbon. The folds 2 and 3 may have any desired relative arrangement, but for the sake of symmetry I prefer to arrange them alternately as shown so that the alternate folds will be the folds 2 with the deeper portions 4 at the edge 5 of the ribbon and the other folds will be the folds 3 with the deeper portions at the edge 1 of the ribbon. In this way the folds have a sort of staggered relation and any two adjacent folds taper in opposite directions.

The ribbon is also so folded that the edges 8 of all the folds are in the same plane, and as a result when a length of the folded ribbon is laid on a table or other support with the edges 8 of the folds on the under side said length will rest flatly on the table or support.

The folds '2 and 3 are preferably so made that the sides 9, ID of each fold converge slightly toward the apex or top H of the fold, and since the folds are thus open on the under side one length of the ribbon material may be superposed on another length in nesting relation as shown in Fig. l with the top or ridge l l of each fold of the bottom layer nesting into a corresponding fold of the upper layer.

For shipping the candy I propose to pack several strips 15 of the ribbon candy in boxes with this nesting relation and will preferably use sheets of soft flexible paper 13 between the separate layers or strips. These sheets will also preferably extend slightly beyond the edges 5, I of the layers, as seen at I4 in Figs. 5 and 6, thereby forming a packing between the edges of the nested layers and the walls of the box, and between the edges of the tiers of nested layers which may be packed in any individual box. In Fig. 5 there is shown somewhat diagrammatically a box H in which a plurality of tiers of nested strips [5 are packed, and said figure shows how the projecting portions IQ of the packing paper serve to hold the tiers separated and thus prevent the adjacent tiers from contacting with each other when the box is shipped. When the ribbon candy is thus packed the nesting of the folds prevents the superposed ribbons from relative movement lengthwise, and the tapered shape of the folds prevents the nested ribbons from shifting relatively in a transverse direction so that the layers of candy in any tier of layers will be retained in position when packed in a box.

I find that candy made and packed in this way can be safely shipped without any special danger of breakage If desired, certain of the folds may be creased or indented along the ridge to make it easier to break the candy up into small lengths when it is removed from the box to be eaten.

As stated above, while I have referred to ribbon candy, yet ribbon material embodying the invention can also be made from other edible material such as that from which crackers or cookies and the like are made.

I claim:

1. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having folds extending transversely thereof, each fold being deeper atone edge of the ribbon structure than at the other edge and the side walls of each fold converging toward each other from the open to the closed edge of said fold.

2. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having folds extending transversely thereof, each fold being deeper at one edge of the ribbon structure than at the other edge and part of the folds having their deepest portion at one edge while the remainder of the folds have their deepest portion at the other edge.

3. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having folds extending transversely thereof, each fold being deeper at one edge of the ribbon structure than at the other edge, the alternate folds having their deepest portion at one edge and the other folds having their deepest portion at the opposite edge.

4. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having transverse folds U-shaped in cross section extending from one edge to the other thereof, each fold being deeper at one edge of the ribbon structure than at the other and all folds having their bottom edges in the same plane.

5. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having transverse folds extending from one edge to the other thereof, the'sides of each fold converging toward the apex thereof and each fold being deeper at one edge of the ribbon structure than'at the other.

6. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having folds extending transversely thereof, each fold having a progressively varying depth from one edge of the ribbon structure to the other edge thereof, and the adjacent folds having their deepest portions at opposite edges of said ribbon structure.

7. Edible material in ribbon form with the ribbon structure having folds extending transversely thereof, each fold having a progressively varying depth from one edge of the ribbon to the other and also having a progressively varying width from the open to the closed edge of the fold, some of the folds having their deepest portion at one edge of the ribbon structure and the remaining folds having their deepest portion at the opposite edge of said structure.

PERLEY A. HILLIARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2640033 *Dec 13, 1947May 26, 1953Micro Proc Equipment IncProcess and apparatus for continuously processing and extruding plasticizing materials
US2648297 *Nov 10, 1950Aug 11, 1953Cloud William SMethod and apparatus for the manufacture of candy
US3973044 *May 3, 1974Aug 3, 1976Battelle Development CorporationProteinaceous food product
US4166136 *Jan 5, 1978Aug 28, 1979Green Giant CompanyLasagna noodle
US4353887 *Aug 11, 1980Oct 12, 1982Ciba-Geigy CorporationDivisible tablet having controlled and delayed release of the active substance
US4508739 *Dec 7, 1982Apr 2, 1985Frito-Lay, Inc.Potato product with opposite corrugations of different frequencies
US4511586 *Aug 3, 1983Apr 16, 1985Frito-Lay, Inc.Potato product with opposite phase-shifted corrugations of the same frequency and amplitude
US4844920 *Jun 1, 1987Jul 4, 1989Chung Jing YauFood wrapper article
US4855151 *Feb 12, 1988Aug 8, 1989Curtice-Burns, Inc.Potato product with asymmetric corrugations
US4891218 *Dec 15, 1986Jan 2, 1990Sherman Daniel ARodenticide bait block
US8475863 *Apr 3, 2007Jul 2, 2013Mars, IncorporatedConfectionery meringue
US20120148724 *May 18, 2010Jun 14, 2012Cadbury Uk LimitedConvoluted chocolate product with regions of weakness and process for preparation thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/144, D01/127
International ClassificationA23G3/34, A23G3/00, A23G3/50
Cooperative ClassificationA23G3/50
European ClassificationA23G3/50