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Publication numberUS2132734 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1938
Filing dateAug 19, 1936
Priority dateAug 19, 1936
Publication numberUS 2132734 A, US 2132734A, US-A-2132734, US2132734 A, US2132734A
InventorsHart Jr Robert W, Parker Hart
Original AssigneeHart Jr Robert W, Parker Hart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laundry net
US 2132734 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O ct. I1, 1938. I P. HART ET AL LAUNDRY NET Filed Aug. 19,1956

INVENTORS ?o-v\ NFY v ATTORNEY of the bag being suiiiciently large to permit circuarticles to be laundered, by being gathered to-- 15 and the absorbed moisture causes the cords to' may well vary to suit the requirements of the 25 absorption and chemical action. p t

These and further objects and advantages of s ok h t rubbe 40 Y our invention will appear from .a more detail d Lithopone 35 50 description thereof, in connection with the ac- Pari white I 22.15 companying drawing, in which: v Li 1.25 Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a laundry bag (or higher) of the type above identified} Sulphur Fig. 2, on a larger scale than Fig. 1, shows the steam: acid .40

' its open weave of such laundry bags and indicates Mercaptobenzothiazole .40

Patented Oct. 11,1938 V Y 2,132,734

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE I mi -3:11" Parker 31%., W. Jr.,

Application August 19, 193 Serial No. 58,73 6 Claims. (Cl. 28-1) This invention relates to laundry nets o'r bags the cords as having been treated in accordance of the open mesh type commonly employed in with our invention; laundries to confine the washing of the indi- Fig. 3 is a perspective' view, on a greatly envidual customer during the laundering processes, larged scale, of one of they treated cords, and 5 and it is particularly directed to a novel con- Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view of such a cord 5 I, struction of the yarns or cords of such "bags indicating the manner infwhich the rubberizing adapted to resist. the deleterious action on the .material penetrates to the-interior of the cord. bags of the washing and bleaching solutions into Referring to the drawing and particularly to which the'bags are immersed. Fig. 1. we have indicated at i-J a laundry bag made It is the common practice of laundries to enin any suitable way. such -;as by being woven on 10 close the washing of each customer in an india'circular loom if a continuous side wall without vidual open mesh bag and to launder the articles seam is desired. The bottom of the bag is formed within the bag by immersing the bag in various with the usual ribbing 2, and may be closed by cleansing and bleaching solutions, the interstices stitching. The top is closed after receiving the lation of the fluids therethrough to launder the gether and pinned with a large safety pin as inarticles withinthe bag. Bags of this character dicated at I. have commonlybeen woven of'cotton cords and Fig. 2 illustrates the coarseness of the weave the chemical and physical actions 01'- the launderof such bags, the-weft or filling threads 4 being in solutions on these strands have caused rapid widely separated from each other and the warp 20 terioration of the bags. The absorption of threads I being similarly spaced to provide large liquid by the cords causes them to swell and apertures 6 through which the washing fluids thereby to become weakened; the I moist cords ,may gain access to, and circulate through, the shrink, thereby reducing the capacity of the bag;- clothing within. The size oi the interstices 6 rot, to mildew and to become sour and give oi! individual user of such bags, as may the style of unpleasant odors. The action of the washing weave, but Fig. 2 illustrates in full scale a web and bleaching fluids on the cords is also partly bins of a popular size and style. chemical in nature in that the basic washing As shown in Fig. 3, the cords, constituting fluids, the acidic sour rinses, and the oxidizing both the warps I and wefts 4, are quite coarse 30 bleaches react chemically on the cord fibres and for the sake of durability, and may be eonstr cause them to deteriorate rapidly. ed of a large number of plies H of yarn suitably It is an object of this invention to provide a spun 0r twisted to rm t o I bag of this character which lasts considerably After the bag has been woven from-cords of b 5 longer than those now in commercial use and this character, we process the bag by first mb which neither shrinks nor becomes offensive durm rsing t n a bath comprising a rubber Solution ing use. To that end we have found that by imor dispersion preferably containing elements pregnating the fibrous cords oi the bag. preferwhich render the rubber capable of subsequent ably after they have been woven into. bag form, l niza n, n produce a deposited Vul nbut also, if desired, before weaving,'with a ized rubber which resists abrasion and chemical 40 her composition preferably of certain ch'aracteraction y the acids, bases and oxidizing ag nts to istics noted in detail hereafter, w can eflecflvely which the bag is exposed duringuse. prevent, or at least materially reduce, both' ab- As an example of a bath which w v f n sorption of fluids by the cords and the chemical Particularly well adapted for the purpose. w

action of the fluids on the cords and we can a 8850mm mm) of 0110mm? mate 45 thereby eliminate the above noted effects of such the solution containing about 15% solids:

concatenated into bag form,

After the bag has been immersed in the above solution for a suitable period of time, such as a minimum of approximately two minutes, it is removed and dried to evaporate any gasoline which may cling to the cords. The dried bag is then subjected to heat treatment with live steam at approximately 40 lbs. pressure for forty-five minutes. It is then removed and washed in cold water to remove any possible traces of iron oxide which may have been deposited during the steaming treatment. The bag is then ready for use.

As illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, the cords is so treated are impregnated with rubber which penetrates the individual strands ii of the cord and also embeds them in a surrounding sheath of rubber as indicated at 20. This penetration is effected partly by the steam treatment. The outside of the cord I0 is coated with rubber as indicated at 2|.

We have found that inuse, a bag so constructed v and treated will not only be impervious to water and resistant to acids and oxidizing agents of the character commonly employed in laundries, but, furthermore, the rubber itself has abrasive resisting qualities and it thereby protects the cords against wear. The vulcanization of the rubber strengthens it and removes most of its natural tackiness. The lime is efiective to counteract the acids in the sour rinsing solutions and prevents the rubber from becoming tacky as a result of. such acidity.

' In a similar manner webbing of any sort, such as tennis nets and the like, may be rendered substantially impervious to moisture or mild chemical fluids. a

We do not wish to limit ourselves to the specific rubber formula set forth above, as other suitable formulae will present themselves to the man skilled in the art. For example, a rubber dispersion, aqueous if desired, such as latex, may be employed in place of a gasoline or similar solution as noted above.

While our preferred method is to treat the cords after they have been woven or otherwise the cords can be treated prior to fabrication with good results. In that event we prefer to dip the cords into a solution of the type above specified and after steam treating the cords to vulcanize the rubber thus deposited, in the manner above described, we then dip the cords in a latex dispersion and then pass them between circumferentially grooved rollers to smooth the deposited coating.

within the bag,

acidity of the washing fluids.

Our invention is not to be limited to the above details except as indicated in the appended claims.

We claim:-

'1. As an article of. manufacture, a laundry bag of the character described, constructed of fibrous cords concatenated to present open meshes for the circulation of laundry fluids through articles the said fibrous cords being impregnated with a material which renders them substantially impervious to said fluids.

2. As an article of manufacture, a laundry bag of the character described, constructed of fibrous cords concatenated to present open meshes for the circulation of laundry fluids through articles within the bag, each of said cords comprising a plurality of fibrous plies twisted together, each of said plies being impregnated with and incased in a .material which renders the cord substan tiallyimpervious to said fluids.

3. As an article bag of the character described, constructed of fibrous cords concatenated to present bpen meshes for the circulation of laundry fluids through articles within the bag, each of said cords comprising a plurality of fibrous plies twisted together, each of said plies being impregnated with and incased in a rubberlzing material and the cords so constructed eachbeing enclosed in a protective sheath of rubberizing material whereby to render the cords substantially impervious to said fluids.

4. As an article 0! manufacture, a laundry bag of the character described, constructed of fibrous cords concatenated to present open meshes for the circulation of laundry fluids through articles within the bag, the said cords being impregnated with vulcanized rubber which renders them substantially impervious to water and the said vulcanized rubber being slightly basic to counteract the acidity of the washing fluids.

5. As an article of manufacture, of the character defined in claim 1, in which the said material with which the fibrous cords are impregnated is a rubberizing material.

6. As an article or manufacture, a laundry bag of the character defined in claim 1, in which the said material with which the fibrous cords are impregnated is slightly basic to counteract the a laundry bag PARKER- mm'r. ROBERT w. HART, J11.

of manufacture, a laundry

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2555561 *May 31, 1946Jun 5, 1951Celanese CorpChemically treated laundry bag
US2607940 *Mar 21, 1949Aug 26, 1952Miller Howard ASoap-dispensing bag
US2848032 *Mar 15, 1956Aug 19, 1958Nist Richard TReceptacle for soiled clothing
US4388739 *Feb 17, 1981Jun 21, 1983Martinon Gerard RaymondWashing bag for curtains, drapes and the like
US4989995 *Sep 7, 1988Feb 5, 1991Fabritec International CorporationAnti-static garment bag for reducing static buildup in the drycleaning process
US5082466 *Jan 22, 1990Jan 21, 1992Fabritec International CorporationAnti-static garment bag for reducing static buildup in the drycleaning process
US5207725 *Sep 12, 1991May 4, 1993Pinkerton Linda LSoap holder
US5789368 *Jan 17, 1997Aug 4, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyFabric care bag
US6171346Mar 18, 1997Jan 9, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyDual-step stain removal process
US6233771Jan 17, 1997May 22, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyStain removal device
US6257790Dec 29, 2000Jul 10, 2001Ellis I. ToderContainer for storing and displaying a soap system
US7374070 *Mar 13, 2006May 20, 2008Rebecca DikesDevice for hanging and storing undergarments and method therefor
US8801286 *Feb 13, 2009Aug 12, 2014Mont-Bell Co., Ltd.Storage bag
US20070210124 *Mar 13, 2006Sep 13, 2007Rebecca DikesDevice for hanging and storing undergarments and method therefor
US20100002962 *Feb 13, 2009Jan 7, 2010Mont-Bell Co., Ltd.Storage Bag
US20130270131 *Apr 16, 2012Oct 17, 2013Jon-Yie ShiehCollapsible laundry basket
EP0034557A1 *Feb 17, 1981Aug 26, 1981Gérard Raymond MartinonBag for washing curtains, laces and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/102, 206/524.3, 139/420.00R, 383/117, 15/227, 139/389
International ClassificationD06F95/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F95/006
European ClassificationD06F95/00B2B