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Publication numberUS2132924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1938
Filing dateJan 29, 1938
Priority dateJan 29, 1938
Publication numberUS 2132924 A, US 2132924A, US-A-2132924, US2132924 A, US2132924A
InventorsBelden Albert G
Original AssigneeNorton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cylindrical grinding machine
US 2132924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1938. A. e. BELDEN CYLINDRICAL GRINDING MACHINE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 29, i933 HLBERT E. BELDE/v Mm-ma Oct. 11, 1938. A. G. BELDE'N CYLIINDRICALI GRINDING MACHINE Filed Jan. 29, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 amen tom F/L BERT G. BELDEN Patented Oct. 11, 1938 PATENT OFFlCE OYLINDRICAL GRINDING MACHINE Albert G. Belden, Worcester, Mass, assignor to Norton Company, Worcester, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Application January 29, 1938, Serial No. 187,615

3 Claims.

The invention relates to grinding machines, and more particularly to an improvement in cylindrical grinding machines.

One object of the invention is to provide a simple thoroughly practical cylindrical grinding machine of the large roll grinding type with a swivel adjustment for the work table whereby the table may be readily adjusted as desired. Another object of the invention is to provide a cylindrical grinding-machine with a two-part swivel table, each of which is independently adjustable to facilitate adjustment "of the work axis in grinding either atrue cylindrical work piece or a tapered work piece. Other objects will be in part obvious or in part pointed out hereinafter. j I i The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, as will be exemplified in the structure to be hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is shown one of many possible embodiments of the mechanical features of this invention,

Figure 1 is a frontelevation of a cylindrical grinding machine of the roll grinding type embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a fragmetary plan view of the front portion of the grinding machine as shown in Fig. 1, showing the headstock, footstock, swivel tables and work supporting carriage;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken approximately on the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional View, on an enlarged scale, taken approximately on the line 44 of Figure 1; and t Figure 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of .40 the nut and screw of the swivel adjustment shown in Figures 3 and 4.

A cylindrical grinding machine of the large massive type suitable for the grinding of rolls for steel mills and the like has been illustrated in the drawings having a base l0 which supports a longitudinally reciprocable Work supporting carriage ll on the usual flat way l2 and V-way l3. The table II may be reciprocated longitudinally by a power drivenmechanism or .may be traversed longitudinally by means of a manually operable hand wheel IS. The hand wheel I5 is mounted on the outer end of a rotatable shaft I6 which carries a gear I! at its inner end. Thegear ll meshes with a gear l8 mounted on the outer end of a shaft IS. The inner end of the shaft [9 (Fig. 3) is provided with a gear 28 which meshes with a rack 2| depending from the under side of the table II. This mechanism has not been illustrated in detail, since it merely represents one form of manually operable feed- 5 ing mechanism which is old and well known in the art and. is more clearly illustrated in the prior patent to Norton No. 762,838 dated June 14, 1904, to which reference may be had for details of disclosure not found herein.

The table II maybe reciprocated mechanically by means of a power operated mechanism which comprises a multi-stepped pulley (not shown) which is located within the housing 22. This multi-stepped pulley is driven from a suit- 1 able source of power to rotate a shaft 23 which operates a clutch mechanism (not shown) to reciprocate the table H in either direction, as controlled by a reversing lever 24 which is pivotally mounted on the front of the machine base and which is actuated by a pair of adjustable table dogs 25 and 26, respectively. This mechanism has not been illustrated in detail; since it is a mechanism old and well known in the art. For further details of the power operated table reciprocating mechanism, reference may be had to the above-mentioned prior United States Patent No. 762,838 dated June 14, 1904, to which reference may be had for further details of disclosure not contained herein.

A rotatable grinding wheel is supported on a wheel spindle (not shown) which is in turn journalled in suitable bearings in a wheel slide 3|. The wheel spindle and grinding wheel 30 may be rotated by means of an electric motor ;3- 32 mounted on the upper surface of the wheel slide 3 I. The motor 32 is provided with an armature shaft 33 which is provided at its outer end with a multiple V-groove pulley 34 which is connected by multiple V-belts 35 with a pulley 33 14 mounted on the outer end of the wheel spindle. The wheel slide 3| is arranged to be fed transversely relative to the base I!) on a V-way 31 and a fiat way 38.

A nut and screw feeding mechanism is provided to feed the slide transversely to move the grinding wheel either toward or from the work piece, as desired. A feed screw shaft 39 projects from the front of the machine. The shaft 39 is provided at its outer end with a gear 40 which meshes with a small gear (not shown) which may be rotated by means of a manually operable feed wheel M. The feed wheel 4| is provided with a micrometer adjusting mechanism 42 to facilitate a fine adjustment of the infeeding movement of the grinding wheel 30 in grinding a work piece to the required predetermined size.

In grinding large rolls, such as those used in steel mills, it is frequently necessary to grind and regrind rolls which are many feet long and two or more feet in diameter and which may weigh as much as ten tons or more. In grinding large cylindrical objects of this type, especially the longer lengths, it has been necessary in the past to provide a base member and work table made up in sections, which sections are bolted together and finished in perfect alignment. In cylindrical grinding machines of this type, it is desirable that means be provided for swivelling the work support to vary the position of the work axis relative to the path of travel of the work carriage so that either a true cylinder or a tapered surface may be ground when desired.

A rotatable work support is provided comprising a motor driven headstock 45 having a headstock center #6 which is arranged to engage and support one end of a work piece, such as a roll 41. The headstock 45 may be of the well known motor driven type having an electric motor 68 mounted thereon which is arranged to rotate a face plate which carries a work driving pin 56. A work driving dog 5| is clamped on the end of the work piece 41 and serves to transmit a rotary motion from the headstock 65 to the roll 41. The other end of the roll 41 is supported by means of a footstock 52 which is provided with a footstock center 53. The footstock center 53 engages and rotatably supports the other end of the work piece or roll 41.

To permit adjustment to align the axis of the work piece or roll 41 with the path of movement of the carriage II, a swivel adjustment-is provided for the headstock 45 and footstock 52. It has been found in the past that when a swivel table extends the entire length of the work supporting carriage, particularly in the long lengths of machines, due to the massive headstock and footstock and also due to the weight of the swivel table it is impracticable to swivel a long table without flexing or distorting the table in so adjusting it. To overcome this difiiculty and thereby attain the main object of this invention, I provide a pivot stud 66 which is fixedly located in the reciprocable work carriage H at a point midway between its ends. A swivel table BI is provided on the right-hand end of the work carriage I! and serves as a support for the footstock 52. The swivel table 6| is provided with a semi-circular projecting portion 62 which has a central aperture which fits around the pivot stud 60. The outer end of the swivel table 6| is provided with an adjusting screw 63 which is rotatably supported by a bushing 64 fixed to a portion of the swivel table 6|. The screw 63 engages or meshes with a nut 65 which is supported by the carriage The outer end of the screw 63 is provided with an end portion of a square cross-sectional shape 66 to facilitate applying a wrench to adjust the position of the swivel table 6i relative to the reciprocable carriage II. To compensate for the swinging adjustment of the outer end of the swivel table 6|, the nut 65 is preferably mounted so thatit may swivel relative to its supporting means. The table II is provided with a fixed stud 61 which rotatably supports a square shaped guiding plate 68. The guiding plate 63 slidably fits Within a slot 69 cut in the under surface of the nut 65. When the screw 63 is rotated to swivel the table 6| relative to the carriage H, the nut 65 is held in a fixed lateral position relative to the carriage II by means of the stud 61 but is permitted to swivel and slide longitudinally due to the guide plate 68 being free to rotate relative to the stud 61 and also due to the nut 65 being free to slide longitudinally of the machine relative to the plate 68, so that when the screw is rotated to adjust the swivel table 6|, the nut will be free to move endwise and to swivel to prevent cracking of the screw and. nut and thereby to facilitate adjustment of the mechanism. The swivel table 6| is provided with an index pointer 10 which projects therefrom and extends over a graduated scale H which, as illustrated, is carried by a clamping block 12 which may be clamped to the end of the carriage by means of screws I3 and 14 to lock the swivel table in its adjusted position. The clamping block" has an inwardly projecting portion 15 which engages an end portion 16 of the swivel table so that when the screws 13 and 14 are tightened, the outer end of the swivel table will be securely clamped in adjusted position.

A swivel table is supported on the lefthand end of the carriage ll andserves as a support for the headstock 45. The swivel table 80 has a semi-circular shaped projection 8| on its right-hand end which overlaps the projection 62 of the swivel table 6|. The projection 8| has an aperture which fits around the pivot stud 60. The outer or left-hand end of the swivel table 80 is provided with a micrometer adjusting mechanism which is substantially identical to that shown and described in connection with the swivel table 6|. Consequently, all of the details of the adjusting mechanism for the swivel table 80 have not been illustrated. For details not clearly shown, reference may be had to Figs. 3, 4 and 5 which show thedetails of construction. A rotatable screw similar to the screw 63 is rotatably supported in a bushing 82 fastened to the left-hand end of the swivel table 80. This screw is provided with an outwardly extending squared projection 83. The swivel table 86 is provided with an outwardly extending index finger 84 which extends out over a graduated scale 85 formed on the clamping block 86 to facilitate accurate adjustment of the swivel table 80. The clamping block 86 is clamped in place on the carriage by screws '81 and 88 so that the swivel table, after adjustment, may be readily lockedin adjusted position.

The operation of this improved machine is readily apparent from the foregoing disclosure. A work piece or roll 41 is mounted in position on the headstock center 56 and footstock center 53. The swivel table 6| is then adjusted to the zero point if a true cylinder is to be ground on the periphery of the work piece and the swivel table 6| is then looked in adjusted position. Similarly, the swivel table 86 is then adjusted by means of the screw adjusting mechanism so that the index finger 64 coincides with the zero mark on the scale 85 so that the axis of the headstock center is in axial alignment with the axis of the rootstock center, and the swivel table 86 is then looked in adjusted position by tightening the clamping screws 81 and 88 on the clamping block 86 and the grinding operation may then proceed to grind a true cylindrical work piece. If for any reason the work grinds tapered, either the swivel table 6| or the swivel table 80 may be adjusted at their outer ends toward or from the grinding wheel to compensate for the error produced in the work piece.

Similarly, if it is desired to grind a taper on the work piece, the two swivel tables GI and 80 may be independently adjusted, the table 6| being adjusted to provide a taper of the desired extent and then clamped in place, after which the table 88 is adjusted by a similar amount in the opposite direction and clamped in place so that the axis of the work support centers is angularly positioned relative to the axis of the wheel spindle so as to produce the desired taper. By providing independent swivel tables, each of which is separately and independently adjustable, the, head and footstock may be readily swivelled and adjusted without flexingor straining a massive table member, since only about half of the weight and the headstock or footstock have to be moved in adjusting either the swivel table 6| or the swivel table 80.

It will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention apparatus in which the various objects hereinabove set forth together with many thoroughly practical advantages are successfully achieved. As -many possible embodiments may be made of the above invention and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In a cylindrical grinding machine having a base, a longitudinally reciprocable carriage, a swivel table supported thereon, a headstock carried thereby, a second swivel table mounted on said carriage, a footstock supported thereon, a pivot stud fixed to said table which serves as a common pivot for the adjacent ends of said swivel tables, and an independent micrometer adjusting mechanism adjacent to the outer end of each swivel table to facilitate independent swivel adjustment of each swivel table.

2. In a cylindrical grinding machine having a base, a longitudinaly reciprocable carriage, a swivel table supported thereon, a headstock carried thereby, a second swivel table mounted on said carriage, a rootstock supported thereon, a pivot stud fixedly mounted to said table and located at a point midway between its ends which serves as a common pivot for the adjacent ends of said swivel tables, and an independent micrometer adjusting mechanism adjacent to the outer end of each swivel table including an index pointer and a graduated scale, one of which is fixed to the carriage and the other of which is fixed to the swivel table.

3. In a roll grinding machine, a base, a longitudinally reciprocable work supporting carriage thereon, a rotatable work support on said table comprising a headstock and a rootstock, a pivot stud located centrally on said carriage, a swivel table to support said rootstock having its inner end pivotally connected to said stud, a second swivel table to support said headstock having its inner end pivotally connected to said stud, and an independent micrometer adjusting mechanism adjacent to the outer end of each swivel table to facilitate independent swivel adjustment of each swivel table.

ALBERT G. BELDEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2546687 *Aug 24, 1945Mar 27, 1951 Engine lathe
US2855688 *Jul 11, 1955Oct 14, 1958Norton CoMicrometer adjuster
US3003294 *Jan 13, 1959Oct 10, 1961Cincinnati Milling Machine CoClamping mechanism for machine tool
US3011373 *Apr 22, 1953Dec 5, 1961Waldrich OskarMachine tools
US3133470 *Mar 27, 1962May 19, 1964Sipos WalterMachine tool positioning apparatus
US3180062 *Nov 5, 1962Apr 27, 1965Sheffield CorpMachine tool supporting structure
US4144676 *May 11, 1977Mar 20, 1979Moll Hans HMachine tool having frame mounted head and tail stocks
US4376357 *Aug 20, 1980Mar 15, 1983Keighley Grinders (Machine Tools) Ltd.Machine tools
US4586294 *Feb 27, 1985May 6, 1986Keighley Grinders (Machine Tools) LimitedMachine tools
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/394, 451/413, 451/398, 82/148, 409/220, 82/142, 82/137
International ClassificationB24B5/00, B24B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationB24B5/04
European ClassificationB24B5/04