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Publication numberUS2137876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1938
Filing dateOct 26, 1936
Priority dateOct 26, 1936
Publication numberUS 2137876 A, US 2137876A, US-A-2137876, US2137876 A, US2137876A
InventorsHudson Finn S
Original AssigneeHudson Finn S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wallpaper remover
US 2137876 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 22, 1938. F. s. HUDSON 2,137,876

WALLPAPER REMOVER Filed OGY. 26, v1936 5 SheetS-Shee l III o loll lll l BY

, ATTORNEY Nov. 22, 1938. F. s. HUDSON WALLPAPER REMOVER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 26, 1956 5ML-@M73 Wm M /724 ATTORNEY Nov. 22, 1938. F. s. HUDSON v l 2,137,876

WALLPAPER f REMOVER Filed oct., 2e, 195e s sheets-sneet s #121 ArroRNEY Patented Nov. 22, 1938 UNITED YSTATES PATE-NT OF'FiCE 19 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in wall papei` removers.

It is adapted for uses Where it is desired to employ steam for heating and moistening purposes, as for the shrinking of fabrics, and it is particularly Well adapted for -use in removing wall paper from a wall.

This application is a continuation in part of an application for Letters Patent for an improvement in Wall paper removers, filed by me October 2, 1933, having Serial Number 691,823.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a novel humidifying and heating apparatus in which the quality of the steam discharged therefrom may be varied as to moisture content.

A further object of my invention is the provision of novel thermostatically controlled means for retaining the moisture content of -the steam at apredetermined amount, combined with novel means by whichv the thermostatic control may be regulated so as to vary saidY predetermined amount to suit the particular use.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a novel steam generator.

Still another object of my invention is the provision of a novel wall paper remover which is simple, cheap, durable, not likely to get out of order, which is easily operated, and reliable in its operation.

The novel features of my invention are hereinafter fully described and claimed.

In .the accompanyingdrawings, which illustrate my invention,

Fig. l is a front elevation of one form of my invention, parts being broken away.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side view, partly in vertical section and partly in side elevation, of the form of my invention shown in Fig. 1, as appliedto wall paper on a Wall.

. Fig. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional View of some of the parts shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section on the line 4 4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a reduced side view, .partlybroken away, of one of the heating elements, of which two are employedin each form of myinvention.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged section on 4the line 6-6 of Fig. 2, showing the check valve which is employed ineach ormof my invention.

Fig. 7 is a rear elevation, with-the handleremoved, of another form of my invention.

- Fig. 8 an enlarged vertical sectional View of some of the parts of the form otmy invention shown in Fig. 7.

(Cl. 12S-271.1)

Fig. 9k is a sectional view yoffsome of the parts shown in Fig. 8, further enlarged.

f Fig. 10 is anenlarged section on the line lll-I0 of Fig. 9.

Figli is an enlargedinside .view of the thermo- 5 static barA shown inFigs. 8 and 9 and its supportingfplate.

. Fig. 12 isan enlarged vertical sectional view of the apparatus shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, as applied .to Wall-paperon a Wall, some of the parts 10 being shown in elevation.

Fig. 13 is a lreduced `side elevation of the apparatus shown in Figsq'? to .12.

Fig. 14 is a front elevation, partly broken away,

Off theapparatusshown in- Figs. `7 to 13. 15

Fig.- 15 is an `inside view of the steam diifusing plateemployed in the apparatus shown in Figs. 'Ito 14.

f Fig. 16 is a rear elevation of each form of my invention. 20

Fig. 17 is a central vertical sectional View, partly broken away, of a modicationof a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 18 is a reduced front view, broken away,` of the form shown in Fig. 17. 25

Similar characters oi reference designate Vsimilar parts in the different Views.

In each form of my invention, the apparatus shown is provided with a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against wall 30 paper which is to be removed from a wall, and in each form the body is provided with a chamber in which islocatedpart of a iuid conductor having an inlet for Water and having an outlet discharging into-fthe recessed side of the body, 35 means being provided in the chamber for heating the fluid conductor, and thermostatic means being provided for automatically opening a valve controllingsaid outlet, when the temperatureoi theheated portion of the conductor reaches a 40 predetermined degree.

In the form shown in' Figs. 1 2 and 3, the body of the-apparatus comprises, as shown, a rectangularppan shaped member I, which is adapted to be placed with its open side next to Wall paper v2 on 45 a Wall 3, and toiorm therewith a chamber into which moistened steam is to be discharged for the purpose of `heating" and moistening the wall paper 2, so that it may be readily scraped from the Wall 3. 50

Another part of. the body comprises a pan shaped member 4 fastened to the rear side of the member l with its open side next to said member, thetwopan shaped members I and 4 forming a chamber 5 in which is located asteam generator 55 comprising a fluid conductor comprising the following described parts. At the inlet end of the fluid conductor is a valve casing 6 threaded at its outer end for attachment to a hose for supplying water to the iiuid conductor. As shown in Fig. 6, the valve casing 5 has within it an inwardly opening check valve `I, which prevents back flow of water discharged through the valve casing into a pipe 8 connected to the valve casing, and which discharges into a portion 9 having the form of a iat spiral, the convolutions of which are closely adjacent to each other. The inner end of said spiral 9 discharges into a passage I0 in a boss I I at the rear side of a plate I2 fastened to the rear side of the member I and covering a hole I3 in said rear side. l

The plate I2 has extending through it from front to rear and through the boss I I a passage lli which communicates with the passage I0, and which is threaded at its forward end and has iitted therein a tubular plug I5, Fig. 3, the outer end of which is provided with a valve seat against which is adapted to seat a valve I6 having a stem II extending through the passage I4. The rear end of the stem I1 is threaded and has adjustably tted thereon a nut I8 against which bears one end of a coil spring I9, the other end of which bears against the rear end of the boss II.

The spring I9 serves as resilient means which normally forces the valve I6 to the closed position. By adjusting the nut I8, the tension of the spring I9 may be increased or decreased as desired.

The plug I5 serves as the outlet for and with the plate I2 forms part of the iiuid conductor, which outlet discharges, when the valve I6 is open, into a chamber 29 formed by an annular iiange 2| on the front side of the plate I2, and a plate 2?. fastened to the front edge of the annular iiange 2|.

The annular flange 2| is provided with outlet holes 23 which discharge into the pan shaped member I.

For opening the valve I6 when the spiral 9 is suiliciently heated, the valve I6 is fastened to the rear side and middle portion of a thermostatic bar 24 the ends of which are seated respectively in two recesses 25 in the front side of the flange 2|, Figs. 1 and 3. The thermostatic bar 24 is arranged so that, when heated, its middle portion will move forwardly, thus opening the valve IS, so as to permit the steam to be discharged into the chamber 20, and thence by the holes 23 into the pan shaped member I.

When the thermostatic bar 24 cools the valve i6 will move toward the closed position. The bar 24 is heated from the heated spiral 9, by conduction through the plate I2, and through the iniiuence of the electric heating units 26, of which there are two disposed respectively flatwise against the front and rear of the spiral 9.

The heating units 26 may be of any desired type. The ones shown each consists of a re sistance strip 21 wound around a mica or other insulating ring 28, and two insulating discs 29 of mica at opposite sides of the strip 2T, Fig. 5.

The ends of each strip 21 have respectively attached to them plates 29 and 30 of conductive material fastened respectively to the plates 29 and 39 of the other heating unit.

Two conducting wires 3| and 32 are respectively fastened to the pairs of plates 29 and 30 and extend through a handle 33 which is fastened to the rear side of the member 4, Fig. 2.

For preventing steam escaping rearwardly through the passage I4, the rear end of the boss II is threaded and has fitted on it a tube 34 threaded at its rear end and having removably fitted thereon a cap 35. On removing the cap 35, the nut I8 is accessible for adjustment, for varying the tension of the coil spring I9.

The front edge of the member I may have fitted on it a channel shaped soft rubber bearing member 36, Fig. 2, adapted to bear slidingly upon the wall paper 2, when the apparatus is being used for loosening of the paper from the Wall 3. This member 36 serves to seal the joint between the member I and the wall paper.

The tube 34 bears at its front end against a plate 3'! which bears against the rear side of the heating unit 26 and holds the latter clamped to the rear side of the spiral portion 9, which in turn clamps the other heating unit 26 against the rear side of the plate I2. The tube 34 extends rearwardly through a, hole provided in the rear of the member 4, so that the cap 35 may be removed for adjustment of the nut I8.

The holes 23 have a combined cross sectional area much greater than the passage I4, so that no appreciable pressure of steam occurs in the chamber 20.

When current is supplied to the heating units 26 through the wires 3| and 32, and water is admitted through the Valve casing 6, the water will be converted into steam in the spiral 9 very quickly, such spiral having a relatively small cross sectional area as compared with its length.

When the required predetermined pressure of steam has been reached in the spiral 9, the steam, which is saturated, will be discharged into the member through the chamber 2D, the steam heating the plate I2 sufficiently to cause the thermostatic bar 24 to move outwardly at its middle portion so as to open the valve I8. If too much water is discharged with the steam, or the steam is too wet, the nut I8 is adjusted so as to increase the tension of the spring I9 upon which the steam will be heated to a greater degree and will become dryer.

If insuflicient moisture is discharged with the steam, the nut I8 is adjusted so as to decrease the tension of the spring I9.

By proper adjustment of the nut I8, to conform to the water pressure employed, and to the heating conditions, the steam discharged will have the proper quality for the use intended.

In the form shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the thermostatic bar 24 is located outside the outlet of the steam generator, where there is substantially atmospheric pressure. In this location of the bar 24, it is not liable to incrusting deposits which might interfere with its proper operation.

The form shown in Figs. '7 to l5 corresponds in structure and operation to the form shown in Figs. l. to 3, with the exception of some difference due to the location of the thermostatic bar within the fluid conductor or steam generator.

In the form shown in Figs. 7 to 15, the body corresponds substantially to that of the other form of my invention, being provided with a pan shaped member I. having a soft rubber bearing member 36 adapted to have a sliding bearing against wall paper 2 which is to be heated and moistened. Another pan shaped member 4 is fastened to the rear end of the member I, and forms therewith a chamber 5, in which is located the flat spiral portion 9 of the fluid conductor, which has an inlet portion 8 provided with an inwardly opening check valve S, adapted to be attached to and supplied with water by a hose 38, Fig. 16.

As with the form of my invention shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the fiat spiral portion 9 is disposed between two electrical heating units 26, Figs. 8, 12 and 14, corresponding to those already described, and shown in Fig. 5, and having their terminals 29 and 30 respectively connected to two electrical conductors 3| and 32, by which the heating units are supplied by current from a suitable source, not shown.

A handle 33 is attached to the member 4 and is provided with a hollow handhold through which extend the conductors 3| and 32, Fig. 12.

yThe inner end of the flat spiral portion 9 of the fluid conductor discharges'into a chamber 39, Fig.'8, provided between two plates 40 and 4I, the latter being attached to the rear of the plate 4D and the plate 40 being clamped against the rear heating unit 26 by means of a threaded nipple 42, which bears at its front end against the front side of the rear portion of the member I. The nipple 42 extends through the member I and has threaded engagement at its rear end with a tubular boss 43, the front end of which bears against the rear side of the rear part of the member I.

The nipple 42 discharges into a recess 44 in the rear side of a plate 45, Figs. 8, 12 and 15, which is fastened to the front side of the rear portion of the member I. The rear side of the plate 45 has radial passages 46 extending to its periphery and discharging into the member I, the inner ends of said passages 46 communieating with the recess 44.

The boss 43 extends forwardly from. the front side of the plate 40 which forms part of the fluid conductor heated by the units 26 and has fitted in the rear end of its passage 41 a nipple 48, the rear end of which has a seat on which is adapted to bear a valve'49 fastened to the front side and middle portion of a thermostatic bar 50 disposed in the chamber 39, Figs. 8 and 9, and provided at its ends with slots 5I in which are respectively disposed reduced portions 52 of two screws 53 respectively adjustably tted in two threaded holes 54 in the front side of the plate 4E. The nipple 48, passage 41 and nipple 42 form the outlet of the fluid conductor. By adjustment of the screws 53, the thermostatic bar 5i! may be adjusted so as to normally hold the valve 49 closed against the nipple 48, when the bar 50 is cold. The thermostatic bar 50 is arranged so that upon being heated, its middle portion will move rearwardly and open the valve 49 at a predetermined temperature.

The rear side of the plate 4I has a rearwardly extending tubular boss 55, which is internally threaded and has fitted adjustably in its rear end a screw 56 against the front end of which bears against the rear end of a coil spring 51, the front end of which bears against the rear side of the thermostatic bar 59, and the tension of which resists the opening rearward movement of the bar 58.

For adjusting the screw 56, its rear end is provided with a flat extension 58 .which is longitudinally slidably and nonrotatably tted in a l tudinal slot 59 in the front end of a closure longitudinally slidable and rotatable' in a L,leeve 6|, the front end of which has threaded engagement with the rear end of the boss 55,

The closure 66 normally bears against a valveV j seat provided at the rear end of the 'sleeve 6I,

against which seat the closure 60 is normally held by a coil spring 62 in the sleeve 6I, the front end of the spring having a bearing against the screw 56. The rear outer end of the closure 66 has a transverse slot 63 adapted to receive a screw driver by which the closure 60 may be turned for adjustment of the screw 56.

The closure 60 serves the double function of adjusting the screw 56 and of preventing steam escaping from the chamber 39 through the boss 55 and the sleeve 6|.

Water entering the fluid conductor through the valve casing 6 is converted into steam in the spiral portion 9, the steam'passing thence into the chamber 39, Where, when at a sufiiciently high temperature, it so heats the thermostatic bar 50 that the latter moves rearwardly at its middle portion, against the tension of the spring 51 thus opening the valve 49, upon which the steam passes through the nipple 48, the passage 41 and nipple 42 into the recess 44, from which the steam is discharged through the passages 46 into the member where the steam is diffused and heats and moistens the wall paper 2, so that the paper can be easily scraped from the wall 3.

If the steam discharged is too hot and dry, the closure 60 is adjusted so as to lessen the tension of the spring 51, thus enabling the thermostatic bar to open the valve 49 at a lower temperature, so as to increase the moisture content of the discharge steam, as well as to lower its temperature.

By adjusting one or both of the screws 53, so as to move the bar 58 forwardly, the latter will hold the valve 49 with more pressure against the nipple 48, and a higher temperature of the steam will be required to cause the bar 50 to open the valve 49.

The structures shown in Figs. 1 to 16 inclusive, and which have been hereinbefore described, are identical in structure, mode of operation and functions effected to the structures shown and described in my aforesaid application, Serial Number 691,823, of which this application is a continuation in part.

In the modification, shown in Figs. 17 and 18, the structure corresponds to that shown in Figs. l to 3, with the following exceptions.

A ball valve 64 is seated in the outer end of the tubular plug I5, the valve corresponding in function to the valve I6. The valve stem I1 and nut 8 and spring I9 are eliminated.

A- thermostatic bar 65, which corresponds in structure to the thermostatic bar 24, is mounted in the chamber 66, corresponding to the chamber 26, which is at the front side of the plate 61 which corresponds in function to the plate I2.

The thermostatic bar 65 bears at the center of its rear side against the ball valve 64 and is adapted to seat the latter.

A screw cap 68 is tted in the threaded inner side of the chamber 66 and bears against the front side of the outer end portions of the thermostatic bar 65, and holds the latter against the ball valve 64.

The tubular valve seat plug I5 is the discharge end portion of the fluid conductor, which has already been described with reference to Figs. 1 to 3.

The thermostatic bar 65 is the same as the thermostatic bar 24, and is of usual type, being composed of two strips B and S of sheet metal, as brass and steel, of different coefficients of expansion, and integrally fastened together side by side, whereby, when heated, the bar will form an arc with the metal having the 'greater coci'iicient of expansion on the convex side.

The thermostatic bar B is reversible side for side in the chamber 66. By removing the screw cap 5S, the bar 65 may be reversed With the brass side B at the outer side, in which case when heated, the middle portion of the bar would move outwardly and permit the valve 64 to move from the closed position. The operation would then correspond to that of the form shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the escape of steam would permit more water to ow into the conductor, thus lowering the temperature, upon which the thermostatic bar 65 in cooling, would move the valve 64 toward the closed position until a balance would be obtained, and the discharge would become uniform, with a uniform moisture content.

As shown in Figs. 17 and 18, the steel sideS of the thermostatic bar is at the outer side, the brass side B being against the ball valve 64.

Upon heating the conductor, in the manner already described, and permitting water under pressure to flow into the conductor, the iluid pressure will open the valve, and the heated fluid discharged from the tubular plug I5 into the chamber GG will heat the thermostatic bar 65 and cause its middle portion to move inwardly, thus forcing the valve 64 toward the closed position until a balanced position is obtained, in which the valve will permit a certain amount of fluid to be discharged. If the heat increases, the bar 65 will move the ball valve 64 closer to its seat, and if the temperature falls, the bar 65 will move outward and permit the valve to move farther from its seat.

By adjusting the screw cap 68 inwardly and outwardly, the pressure of the thermostatic bar against the ball valve 64 will be varied, and the amount of discharge and moisture content oi the uid discharged may be accordingly adjustably varied.

From the foregoing, it will be understood that with the use of an improved wall paper remover, in the diiferent forms shown and described herein, the quality of the steam discharged into the pan shaped member l will be automatically regulated as to temperature and moisture content.

Due to the relatively long at spiral portion S of the iiuid conductor, and to its relatively small diameter, and to the disposition of the heating units flatwise at opposite sides of the spiral portion 9, the Water is quickly converted into steam, with a minimum consumption of electric current.

With the use of thermostatic control, and heating the water as it ilows through the conductor, the quality of the steam discharged for use is automatically controlled and kept uniform.

I do not limit my invention to the structures shown and described, as other modications, within the scope of the appended claims, may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention.

What I claim iszl. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a thermostat, and means controlled by said thermostat by winch the flow of iluid through said outlet will be respectively restricted and increased in accordance with the lowering and rising of the temperature of said conductor` 2. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet forv water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a thermostat, and adjustable means controlled by said thermostat for respectively restricting and increasing within variable predetermined limits the ow of fluid through said outlet in accordance with the lowering and rising of the temperature of said conductor.

3. In an apparatus of the kind described, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet, a valve for closing said outlet, means for heating said conductor, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet in the path of fluid discharged therefrom disposed so as to be heated by said iluid and engaging said valve and controlling the opening and closing thereof in accordance with the increase and decrease of temperature of said conductor.

4. In a' wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, a valve for closing said outlet, means for heating said conductor, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet disposed so as to be heated by fluid discharged from said outlet and engaging said valve and controlling the opening thereof in accordance with the increase of temperature of said conductor.

5. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve movable to an open position and to a position closing said outlet, yielding means tending to force said valve to one of said positions, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet, disposed so as to be heated by iluid discharged from said outlet and engaging and adapted to move said valve toward the other position in accordance with increase of the temperature of said iluid.

6. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve movable to an open position and to a position closing said outlet, yielding means adjustable as to pressure normally tending to force said valve to one of said positions, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet, disposed so as to be heated by fluid discharged from said outlet and engaging and adapted to move said valve toward the other position in accordance with the increase of the temperature of said uid.

7. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve for closing said outlet, yielding means normally tending to close said valve, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet, disposed so as to be heated by fluid discharged from said outlet and operating when heated to move said valve to open position in accordance with the increase of the temperature of said fluid.

8. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, yielding means adjustable as to pressure normally tending to close said valve, and a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet, disposed so as to be heated by fluid discharged from said outlet and operating when heated to a predetermined degree to move said valve to open position in accordance with'the increase of the temperature of said fluid.

9. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve controlling said outlet, meansnormally closing said valve, and a thermostat disposed so as to be heated by fluid passing through said conductor and engaging and adapted to open said valve when the temperature of said fluid rises to a predetermined point.

10. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve controlling said outlet, means adjustable as to pressure normally closing said valve, and a thermostat disposed so as to be heated by fluid passing through said conductor and engaging and adapted to open said valve when the temperature of said iiuid rises to a predetermined point.

l1. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a thermostat, and means controlled by said thermostat by which the flow of fluid through said outlet will be varied in accordance with the variation in temperature of said fluid.

12. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a thermostat, and means controlled by said thermostat by which the flow of fluid through said outlet will be respectively increased and restricted in accordance with the lowering and rising of the temperature of said fluid.

13. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve for closing said outlet, and a thermostat engaging said valve and disposed so as to be heated by uid passing through said conductor and adapted to move said valve toward the closed position in accordance with increase of temperature of said fluid.

14. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve for closing said outlet, and a thermostat engaging said valve and adapted to hold said valve closed and disposed at the outer side of said outlet in position for being heated by fluid discharged from said outlet, and adapted to permit the valve to move from the closed position in accordance with increase of the temperature of said fluid.

15. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, means for heating said conductor, a valve for closing said outlet, a thermostat at the outer side of said outlet disposed so as to be heated by fluid discharged from said outlet and engaging and adapted to move said valve toward the closed position, and adjustable means for varying the resistance of said thermostat to the opening of said valve.

16. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a fluid conductor having an inlet for water under pressure and an outlet discharging into said recessed side, a valve for closing said outlet, and a thermostat disposed so as to be heated by fluid passing through said conductor and engaging said valve and reversible from one to the other of two positions in one of which it will permit said valve to move from the closed position in accordance with increase of the temperature of said fluid, and in the other position it will tend to resist the opening of said valve in accordance with the increase of the temperature of said fluid.

17. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a water conductor discharging into said recessed side, means for connecting said conductor with a source of water supply under pressure, and means for heating the water and converting it into steam while the water is flowing through said conductor.

18. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber,

a water conductor discharging into said recessed side, means for connecting said conductor with a source of water supply under pressure, means for heating the water and converting it into steam while the water is flowing through said conductor, and means for controlling the flow of uid from said conductor into said recessed side.

19. In a wall paper remover, a body having a recessed side adapted for sliding movement against a wall and to form therewith a chamber, a water conductor discharging into said recessed side, means for connecting said conductor with a source of water supply under pressure, means for heating the water and converting it into steam while the water is flowing through said conductor, and means for controlling the amount of the moisture content of the heated fluid discharged into said recessed side.

FINN S. HUDSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2574900 *Jun 11, 1947Nov 13, 1951Sun Chemical CorpSteam applicator
US2613603 *Jun 11, 1947Oct 14, 1952Specialty Papers CompanyMethod and apparatus for setting moisture-setting printing inks
US2628610 *Sep 28, 1949Feb 17, 1953Christopher Albert SLoosening apparatus for wall coverings
US2636969 *Apr 7, 1951Apr 28, 1953 Bun warmer
US2673918 *Sep 6, 1951Mar 30, 1954Jerral E LawtonElectric wallpaper remover
US2676239 *May 8, 1951Apr 20, 1954Goldwater Bernard LSteam-applying device
US2726314 *Dec 4, 1952Dec 6, 1955Prain Willis AWallpaper steamers
US2835781 *Mar 21, 1957May 20, 1958Peter BashukElectrical steam sprayer
US2865119 *Feb 24, 1954Dec 23, 1958Mc Graw Edison CoSteam iron with thermally-operated valve
US3997759 *Nov 18, 1974Dec 14, 1976Osrow Products Co., Inc.Portable hand-manipulatable steamer for loosening the bond between wallpaper and a substrate
US4203026 *Aug 7, 1978May 13, 1980Clairol IncorporatedTemperature responsive fluid delivery control device for a steam curling iron
US4833298 *Nov 19, 1987May 23, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
US4835364 *Nov 19, 1987May 30, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
US4843215 *Nov 19, 1987Jun 27, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
US4851642 *Nov 19, 1987Jul 25, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
US4855568 *Nov 19, 1987Aug 8, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Wallpaper steamer
US4857703 *Nov 19, 1987Aug 15, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Steam generator
US5014337 *Dec 22, 1989May 7, 1991A.R.M.I.N.E.S.Electro-portable apparatus for the production of steam, particularly for ungluing wall coatings
US5917992 *Feb 14, 1997Jun 29, 1999J. Wagner GmbHApparatus for the loosening of wallpaper
US5968401 *Mar 19, 1997Oct 19, 1999Roy; StephenMicrowave radiation insect exterminator
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/271.1, 101/424.1, 392/397, 236/101.00R, 236/101.00E, 34/517, 219/221
International ClassificationB44C7/00, B44C7/02
Cooperative ClassificationB44C7/027
European ClassificationB44C7/02D