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Publication numberUS2138858 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1938
Filing dateJun 1, 1937
Priority dateJun 1, 1937
Publication numberUS 2138858 A, US 2138858A, US-A-2138858, US2138858 A, US2138858A
InventorsHjelm Alfred
Original AssigneeAndrew Hansen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning and extracting machine
US 2138858 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.6,1938. A. HJELM I 2,138,858

CLEANING AND EXTRACTING MACHINE Filed June 1, 1937 I 3 Sheets-Sheet l Ii-g- E ATTORNEY.

INVENTOR.

Dec. 6, 1938. A. HJELM CLEANING AND EXTRACTING MACHI NE Filed June l, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. l? /f r e c! He /m ATTORNEY.

D86. 6, 1938. H'JELM 2,138,858

CLEANING AND EXT RACTING MACHINE Filed June 1, 1937 s Shets-Sheet s Patented Dec. 6, 1938 UNITED STATES CLEANING AND EXTRACTING MACHINE Alfred Hjelm, Plentywood, Mont, assignor of onehalf to Andrew Hansen, Wolf Point, Mont.

Application June 1, 1937, Serial No. 145,709

14 Claims.

This invention relates to cleaning and drying apparatus and particularly to the'type designed for use in the cleaning of clothes and other fabric articles with the use of gasoline or other liquid solutions, and the primary object is to provide a device that is not only very efiicient and practical, but which is also extremely simple in design and construction with a result that it can be manufactured at a cost that will justify its use for home or domestic purposes. More specifically the device comprises a very simple supporting frame in which is tiltably mounted a rotary container that is so designed that it will be operative to perform both cleaning and extracting operations, according to its tilted position, and may extract the liquid without discharging it from the container even though the container and all its parts are substantially united in a single composite structure or unit. Further and more detailed objects will be disclosed in the course of the following specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a side elevation of the machine showing the receptacle and receptacle frame in the angularly tilted position as used for cleaning purposes.

Fig. 2 is a top or plan view of the machine with the receptacle in the vertical or extracting position.

Fig. 3 is a front elevation of the machine with the cleaning and drying receptacle shown in diametrical section.

Fig. 4 is a detail plan view of the outer or arcuate closure plate employed at the upper end of the receptacle.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional view on line 5--5 in Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged section on line 6-6 in Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawings more particularly and by reference characters, I designates a rectangular base, preferably formed of angle iron bars, and is provided with suction cups 8 for engagement with the floor to increase the stability of the machine when in use. The base frame also includes a pair of laterally arranged vertical standards 9, attached to the base and braced with respect thereto by brace bars [0.

At their upper ends the standards 9 are provided with aligned bolts H which serve as pivot supports for a rectangular receptacle supporting frame l2. When the frame I2 is in vertical position its lower end portions have bracing contact with adjacent inner faces of the standards 9, and the receptacle frame may be releasably locked in this position by a keeper l3 mounted on one of the standards and having a finger l4 movable through the standard and for engagement with a perforation I5 in the adjacent bar of frame l2. The keeper is actuated by a spring 5 it but may be easily moved outwardly to withdraw the lock finger when the frame 12 is to be tilted into or out of its vertical position.

The frames are further connected by a link I H, to limit the tilting movement of the recep- 10 tacle frame, and this link is preferably though not necessarily pivoted at l8 to frame l2, while its other end has a headed stud l9 movable in a slot 20 in adjacent standard 9. This slot may have an offset notch at its upper end (see Fig. 1) 15 wherein the stud may rest to releasably hold the frame I2 in tilted position.

The frame l2 includes a lower cross bar 2i and two spaced, upper cross bars 22 and 23, which cross bars serve as bearing supports for lower 20 and upper stud shafts 24 and 25, respectively, of the receptacle 26, and which shafts are rigidly fixed to the ends of the receptacle, axially thereof to rotate therewith. The shaft 25 is provided, intermediate bars 22 and 23, with a small pulley 25 21, connected by a belt 28 to a larger pulley 29 on a shaft 30, also journaled for rotation in the bars 22 and 23. A hand crank 3|. has a non-circular socket adapted to fit either of shafts 25 or 3|) and may be shifted from one to the other de- 30 pending upon the receptacle rotation speed desired. In ordinary cleaning operation, when relatively low speed is desired, the crank is applied to shaft 25 to apply the direct and relatively stronger force needed to operate the receptacle 35 in its inclined position. When the machine is to be used for extraction purposes, however, the receptacle is restored to vertical position, as in Figs. 2 and 3, and the crank is applied to shaft 30. Under this condition there is considerable less resistance to rotation, which in turn permits of the higher speed drive effected by the different diameter of pulleys.

The receptacle 26 is trunco-conical in form and defines a general cleaning chamber 32 and a base or liquid chamber 33 (Fig. 3) having a capped liquid discharge opening 34. At its upper end the receptacle has a top 35 with an opening closed by a friction cover 36, and through which opening the clothes or other articles to be treated are inserted and removed. The upper end of the receptacle 26 proper is provided with a rigid hood or tapered shell 31, forming a head space or chamber above the cover 35. This hood is operative to rigidly connect the receptacle to the supporting and driving shaft 25, and has a lateral opening or passage which is normally closed by an arcuate, circularly adjustable door 38. This door has frictional sliding contact against the inner surface of hood 3! and is provided with an upper, radial wing 39 pivotally engaging a stud 40 at the lower end of shaft 25.

In its lower end portion the receptacle 26 is provided with a cylindrical container 4|, the upper edge of which is in contact with and welded or otherwise suitably fastened to the receptacle Wall, as at 42 (see Fig. 3) while the lower end of the container is annularly spaced with respect to. the adjacent and relatively wider receptacle wall portion at that level. The container wall is profusely perforated, as at 43, but the container bottom, 44, is imperforate so that liquid cannot pass through it. The bottom of the container is provided, immediately outside the container wall, with an annular flange 45, which is also imperforate. This flange is flared outwardly and upwardly, but not sufficiently to reach or touch the receptacle wall. In fact it is important that the parts be so proportioned that a well defined but narrow annular space 46 be left between the upper edge of the flange and the outer receptacle, as will presently be set forth. The container 4| is further provided with agitator blades 41 which serve the double function of assisting in the cleaning operation, by more effective tumbling of the articles being cleaned, and also serve to rein force the container parts 4t and 44 with respect to each other.

The operation of the machine may be described as follows:

Before any material is placed in the receptacle 26 it is preferably first secured in its vertical position, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, at which time the device I3 is operative to releasably fasten the receptacle frame I2 with respect to the standards 9. With the device in this position the door 38 is opened, and the cover 36 is removed to permit placing of articles and cleansing fluid in the receptacle. The amount of fluid should be equal to the cubic capacity of the chamber 33 below the container bottom 44, and extending not higher than the upper edge of the flange 45. With this, or a lesser amount of fluid inserted, and with the clothes or other fabric articles to be cleaned also placed in the receptacle, the cover 36 is replaced and the door 38 is reclosed.

The latch I3 is now released so that the receptacle and receptacleframe'can be tilted to the position shown in Fig. 1, in which position the unit is releasably secured by the link l'l. With the'receptacle in this position the level of the fluid in the lower corner portion 'thereof will be such as to extend considerably 'above the flange 45 and completely saturate the articles within the container 4! The crank 31, or other power element, is then applied to the shaft 25, to rotate the receptacle 26. This rotation, particularly under the action of the agitators 4'1, causes the articles to be cleaned to be intermittently tumbled into and lifted from the fluid body, and this action or movement will quickly and efficiently effect the desired cleaning operation on the articles under treatment.

When the cleaning operation has been completed, the frame I2 is restored to its vertical position and the crank 3| is then applied to the shaft 30, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Turning of the crank now drives the receptacle 26 at a much greater speed because of the difference in the sizes of the two pulleys 21 and 29. The rapid rotation of the receptacle and the clothes or other articles contained therein will set up a centrifugal action that will force the liquid radially outward through the perforations 43. As this occurs the major portion of such liquid will be thrown against the inner wall of the receptacle 26 proper, and as this wall is tapered and flares outwardly as it extends downward from point 42, the liquid thus engaging this surface will be impelled downwardly through the annular passageway 46 and into the chamber 33. The liquid escaping through the lowermost perforations 43 will strike the upwardly flared flange 45, with a result that it will be deflected upwardly and over the edge of the flange, to thus be discharged against the inner wall surface of the outer receptacle; and will thereafter also pass downwardly through the passage 46 and into the chamber 33. The extracting operation may be continued until the cleaned articles have been entirely dried, or it may be continued only sufficiently to extract the major portion of the moisture, after which the articles may be subjected to further drying after being removed from the receptacle. It will thus be seen that the flange 45 in no way obstructs the extracting operation, but on the other hand permits a relatively higher level of cleansing fluid within the chamber 33 without letting such fluid run back into the container 4!.

It is understood that suitable modifications may be made in the structure as disclosed, provided such modifications come within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Having now therefore fully illustrated and described my invention, what I claim to be new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a supporting frame, a liquid holding receptacle mounted for rotation in the frame and adjustable whereby it may be operated with its axis of rotation disposed in either vertical or inclined positions, and a container in the lower portion of the receptacle but spaced from the bottom thereof to support and tumble articles to be cleaned, said container having perforated side wallsand fixed to the receptacle for rotation therewith but spaced therefrom at their lower ortions.

2. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a liquid holding receptacle mounted for rotation at relatively high and low speeds and tiltably adjustable so that it may be rotated with its rotating axis disposed in selective relatively angular positions, and means fixed to and rotatable with the receptacle for supporting articles to be cleaned in the receptacle but above the bottomend thereof, the said supporting means including perforate side walls secured at their upper portions within the receptacle and spaced at their lower portions therefrom.

3. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a supporting frame, a liquid. holding receptacle mounted for rotation in the frame and adjustable whereby it may be operated with its axis of rotation disposed in either vertical or inclined positions, and a container in the lower portionof the receptacle but spaced from the bottom thereof to support and tumble articles to be cleaned, said container having perforated side Walls and fixed to but spaced from the receptacle for rotation therewith, said receptacle being circumferentially enlarged at its lower extremity to form a liquid chamber below the container of greater diameter than the receptacle portion thereabove.

4. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a main frame, a second frame tiltably supported in the main frame and for adjustment into vertical and inclined positions, a receptacle rotatably mounted in the second frame and for containing cleaning liquid and the articles to be cleaned, and means secured in spaced relation within and rotatable with the receptacle for supporting the articles to be cleaned in spaced position above the bottom end of the receptacle.

5. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a generally trunco-conical receptacle mounted for rotation about its axial center and tiltable into vertical and inclined positions, a container secured in the receptacle for rotation'therewith but with its bottom spaced from the bottom end of the receptacle and its annular wall secured at its upper portion within the adjacent wall portion of the receptacle.

6. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a generally trunco-conical receptacle mounted for rotation about its axial center and tiltable into vertical and inclined positions, a container secured in the receptacle for rotation therewith but with its bottom spaced from the bottom end of the receptacle and its annular wall secured at its upper margin to and spaced within the adjacent wall portion of the receptacle, and means for rotating the receptacle.

'7. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a generally trunco-conical receptacle mounted for rotation about its axial center and tiltable into vertical and inclined positions, a container secured in the receptacle for rotation therewith but with its bottom spaced from the bottom end of the receptacle and its annular wall spaced within the adjacent wall portion of the receptacle, and means for rotating the receptacle, said container having a perforate side wall and imperforate bottom, and the said side wall being secured at its upper portion to the receptacle.

8. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a gen erally trunco-conical receptacle mounted for rotation about its axial center and tiltable into vertical and inclined positions, a container secured in the receptacle for rotation therewith but with its bottom spaced from the bottom end of the receptacle and its annular wall spaced at its lower portion within the adjacent wall portion of the receptacle, the said wall being perforated, said container having an imperforate bottom and an annular bottom flange projecting upwardly into the space between said adjacent receptacle and container walls.

9. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a generally trunco-conical receptacle mounted for rotation about its axial center and tiltable into vertical and inclined positions, a container secured in the receptacle for rotation therewith, but with its bottom spaced from'the bottom end of the receptacle and its annular Wall spaced at its lower portion within the adjacent wall portion of the receptacle, the said wall being perforated, and agitator members extending into the container.

10. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a

receptacle mounted for rotation about a vertical axis and tiltably adjustable for rotation about an inclined axis, a container secured within the receptacle for rotation therewith, the said container having aperforated Wall, the receptacle wall adjacent the container flaring outwardly and downwardly, said container having an imperforate bottom and a flange thereabout flaring upwardly toward but spaced from the said receptacle wall to form an annular passage therebetween for the escape of liquid into the bottom portion of the receptacle during the extracting operation.

11. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a receptacle mounted for rotation about a vertical axis and tiltably adjustable for rotation about an inclined axis, a container secured within the receptacle for rotation therewith, the receptacle wall adjacent the container flaring outwardly and downwardly, said container having an imperforate bottom and a flange thereabout flaring upwardly toward but spaced from the said receptacle wall to form an annular passage therebetween for the escape of liquid into the bottom portion of the receptacle during the extracting operation, the container wall being provided with openings to permit centrifugal separation of liquid from cleaned articles supported in the container.

12. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a receptacle mounted for rotation about a vertical axis and tiltably adjustable for rotation about an inclined axis, a container secured within the receptacle for rotation therewith, the receptacle wall adjacent the container flaring outwardly and downwardly, said container having an imperforate bottom and a flange thereabout flaring upwardly toward but spaced from the said receptacle wall to form an annular passage therebetween for the escape of liquid into the bottom portion of the receptacle during the extracting operation, the said container wall being perforated, and agitators in the container to facilitate tumbling of articles therein during the cleaning action when the receptacle and container are rotated about the inclined axis.

13. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a receptacle and a container having a perforate side wall and imperiorate bottom, the upper margin of the side wall being secured in contact with the inner surface of the receptacle but the lower portion of the side wall being spaced from the said inner surface of the receptacle.

14. In a cleaning and extracting machine, a rotatable and tiltable receptacle, a container mounted within the receptacle, the said container having a perforate side wall secured at its upper margin within the receptacle, the lower portion of the container being spaced from both the sides and bottom of the receptacle, thesaid container having an imperforate bottom, and a flange turned upwardly about the bottom of the container between the side walls of the container and receptacle.

ALFRED I-IJELM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2495488 *Aug 21, 1944Jan 24, 1950Sidney StriblingDry cleaning machine
US4860909 *Jan 28, 1988Aug 29, 1989Leumi Dov ATrash receptacle mounted for rotation
US6260391 *Jun 30, 1999Jul 17, 2001Pharmagg Systemtechnik GmbhLaundry centrifuge, in particular for an automated washing range
US6615619 *Mar 21, 2001Sep 9, 2003Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd.Drum-type washing machine
US7254969 *Aug 29, 2002Aug 14, 2007General Electric CompanyRibbed washing machine basket
US20040040346 *Aug 29, 2002Mar 4, 2004General Electric CompanyRibbed washing machine basket
US20070240329 *Apr 18, 2007Oct 18, 2007Weiss Scot HSystem and Method for Manually Drying an Article of Clothing
US20070240577 *Apr 18, 2007Oct 18, 2007Weiss Scot HSystem for cleaning a cylindrical filter
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/25, 248/142, 248/131
International ClassificationD06F23/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F23/02
European ClassificationD06F23/02