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Publication numberUS2139096 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1938
Filing dateOct 23, 1935
Priority dateOct 29, 1934
Publication numberUS 2139096 A, US 2139096A, US-A-2139096, US2139096 A, US2139096A
InventorsEmile Piquerez
Original AssigneeEmile Piquerez
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Installation for the washing of vehicles
US 2139096 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1938.

E. PIQUEREZ INSTALLATION FOR THE WASHING OF VEHICLES Filed Oct. 25, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 6, 1938.. v PIQUEREZ INSTALLATION FOR THE WASHING OF VEHICLES Filed 00's. 23, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Dec. 6, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Emile Piquerez, Saint-Cloud, France Application October 23, 1935, Serial No. 46,437 In France October 29, 1934 10 Claims.

of workmen each of whom has a well defined task to fulfill in the complete operation. One of the greatest difficulties encountered in known installations of this kind and intended to deal with a large number of vehicles is the elimination of mud carried along by the washing water. The mud, which is a mixture of sand, clay, and organic refuse, isextremely sticky and constantly tends to obstruct the conduits for removing the used water.

The main object of the improved installation according to the present invention is to remedy this inconvenience and also to allow a rational and economical carrying out of the process.

The invention is characterized by the following features:

A' mechanical conveyor mechanism moves the vehicle to be washed in front of a set of jets of water under pressure, said jets being operated either by workmen or automatically.

The water flows into a gully where a preliminary decantation takes place and which is situated immediately underneath the conveying mechanism.

A basin or trough for a second decantation is disposed at the end of said gully to receive the water, which allows the mud in suspension to be deposited therein completely.

Mechanical means are provided for periodically removing the mud from the pre-decantation gully and from the decantation basin without the necessity of emptying the gully and basin.

The said mechanical means for removing the mud are advantageously formed by baskets or the like arranged on the bottoms of the gully and basin, all the decanted mud being collected in the baskets or the like.

Devices forming covering-joints cover up the spaces between the baskets or the like and-the spaces between the edges of the baskets and the walls of the gully or the basin, so that the mud cannot enter into the spaces.

The baskets or the like may be adapted to roll upon rails arranged in the decantation gully above the zone in which the mud is deposited. Furthermore, means are provided for directing the dirty wash water over the rails to the basket and thus protecting the said rails from vertical drop of muddy water, thus avoiding the accumulation of mud on the rails.

The pre-decantatlon gully is prolonged beyond the conveyor apparatus by a chamber allowing the baskets or the like to be removed, the rails being extended right into the chamber and means being provided in thisneighbourhood to lift out and empty the baskets when filled with mud.

It is often advantageous to recover the decanted water and to purify 'it completely so as to be able to use it again in the washing operation. To this end, the installation may be provided with a filter which receives the water after decantation and with a reserve trough intended to contain the filtered water and serving as the suction chamber for the pumps.

Other characteristics of the invention will be m apparent from the following description of one constructional form, which is illustrated, by way of example, on the accompanying drawings, whereon:--

Fig. 1 shows, in vertical section, an improved washing installation according to the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a corresponding plan view, the floor being assumed to have been removed at certain places;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section on the line III-III in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view of a basket for removing the mud;

Fig. 5 is a section on the line VV in Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 is a partial plan view corresponding to Fig. 5.

Referring to the drawings:-

A mechanical conveyor I of any type is pro- 3 vided, formed, for instance, by two rows of rollers 2 driven mechanically so as to rotate about their axes. The vehicle 3 to be washed travels on to the floor 4 and then on to the conveyor, where its brakes are put on and the movement of the rollers 2 carries it along the washing station.

This station is served with water supplied under pressure through piping 5 and the washing of the car can be effected by workmen in accordance with its forward movement, the workmen standing on' platforms 6 and 1 arranged on either side and in the middle of the conveyor. This manual work could, however, be replaced by any fixed or movable apparatus whether or not provided with brushes or similar devices adapted to effect the external washing of the vehicle.

The washing water flows through the conveyor and the adjacent platforms, taking the mud with it, and it is collected by inclined planes 8 which form pa'rt of the bottom of a water collecting gully, see Fig. 3, and flows into a longitudinal gully pit 9 where the initial decantation of the used water takes place.

In the gully pit 8 are arranged baskets l suspended by rollers ll rolling upon rails [2, Fig. 3, built in to the vertical walls of the gully pit. Shoulders l3, which may be formed by stonework ledges or by fixed iron sheets, prolong the inclined planes 8 and overlap the edges of the baskets, thus compelling the mud to fall into the baskets and preventing the water and impurities from falling vertically onto the rails and avoid ing deposit of impurities on the rails.

Each of the baskets in carries at one of its extremities a joint-cover [4 formed by a sheet iron plate hinged to the end wall of the basket and which, in the turned down position, covers the space between two consecutive baskets in order to prevent the mud from entering into the said space. As shown in Figs. 5 and 6, a shaft l5, parallel to the longitudinal axis, passes through each basket and extends beyond the two ends of the latter forming hooking trunnions for a movable yoke i6. A slot l'l formed in the joint-covering sheet i4 serves for the passage of said yoke and resists the rocking of the basket when the latter is lifted up by the aid of the yoke.

The pre-decantation gully pit 9 is extended beyond the end of the conveyor by a chamber i8, Fig. 1, the general section of which is the same as that of the gully, but in which the two shoulders l3 are interrupted for a lemgth a little greater than that of one basket. Consequently, a basket which is in the enlarged part between the shoulders l9 can be lifted vertically and the empty baskets can also be reinserted at this point. To do this a lifting apparatus 20, of any kind is disposed above said chamber and may, for instance, consist of a travelling hoist movable along a horizontal girder 2i fixed to the ceiling.

The chamber I8 is normally covered by a latticed floor 22 upon which the vehicles can travel before arriving on the conveyor.

A decantation basin 23, which is disposed behind the chamber [8 and separated from the latter by a partition, communicates with the chamber through an aperture 24 arranged at the normal level of the water.

The bottom of the basin is in the form of a funnel having sloping walls 26 ending in a central sump 21. The sloping walls of the bottom include hinged sheet iron edge covers which prolong the sloping portion of the bottom inwardly over the side edges of the basin sump. Baskets 28, similar to the baskets ID, are arranged in the sump 21 and can be hooked on to by means of the same lifting yokes Hi. The inwardly extending declined edge covers overlie the edges of the baskets and the rails, disposed at the sides of the basin sump, so as to direct the dirty water into the baskets and prevent vertical drop of solids onto the rails. The sheet iron edge covers are hinged to the walls 26 and are operable by means of chains 30 toraise said covers about their hinges. An inspection plate 3|, provided in the floor 4 covering the basin, renders access to the interior of the latter possible and, after the edge covers 29 have been lifted, permits the baskets 28 to be hooked to the yoke [6 in order to remove the baskets by means of the tackle 20.

- The empty baskets can likewise be reinserted in the sump at this point. The decanted water in the basin 23 flows out through an orifice 32 positioned at the normal water level and controlled by a sluice gate, whilst a cock 33 at the bottom of the basin allows the latter to be completely emptied. The bottom of the basin 23 is arranged at a lower level than that of the gully 9 and its bed is inclined towards the orifices of the bottom sluice gates to facilitate the flow and the washing out of the residual mud, some of which, whatever precautions are taken, remains suspended in the water and eventually settles underneath the baskets.

The greater part of the mud is-collected in the baskets I l1 and can easily be removed by successively passing the said baskets into the chamber i8, after having removed the covering grid 22. The baskets are then lifted by the aid of the hoist 20 and of the yoke l6 and conveyed to and emptied into a lorry brought beneath the hoist, at 34 for instance.

The water which flows through the orifice 32 is freed of heavy suspended materials and can be directly removed to the waste pipe. In many cases it is preferable to re-use this water which must therefore be subjected to a more complete purification.

A filter 35 is arranged at the end of the decantation chamber 23 and is preferably of the type having a filtering bed 36 of gravel. The water enters directly into the filter through an orifice 32 arranged at the level of the water and passes from top to bottom through the filtering layer 36. The water is collected again in the lower part of the filter whence a tube 31 conducts it into the reserve container 38 from which it is pumped by a pump 39 that forces it to the washing station through the piping 5. Well known devices, not illustrated in the drawings, provide for the washing and the levelling of the filtering bed 36, and sluice gates 25, 33, 40 and 4|, arranged at the bottom of the gully 9 and of the chambers 23, as and as, allow them to be emptied completely through a collecting discharge pipe 42 for the waste water. Finally, a fresh water supply pipe 43 permits water to be added to any one of the chambers 23, 35 or 38 according to the working requirements.

In the event of the recovered water being used, it may be advantageous to add to the water, where it enters the decantation chamber, a clarifying product to cause the precipitation of the light materials in suspension. The addition of the said product can be carried out by the aid of any suitable known device not illustrated in the drawings.

The above description has been given only by way of example and with the object of making the principle of the invention better understood. It is evident that, without departing from the invention, the baskets serving for the removal of mud could be replaced by any other suitable means, such as a bucket conveyor, a dredger operating continuously or intermittently at the bottom of the pre-decantation gully. In cases where the installation is accessible from below, mechanical devices may even be dispensed with and the mud may be removed by suitable sluice gates arranged at the bottom.

It will also be understood that the relative position of the various containers for decantation, filtration and for the filtered reserve water may be varied indefinitely according to the requirements of the installation. In particular, in a case in which it would be impossible to install these containers below the level of the ground they could be arranged at a higher level, the 7 water being simply collected at the outlet 01' the pie-decantation gully by means of a pump which would force the water into the decantation container.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for cleansing water used for I washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly recovering the washing water, a decantation basin arranged after the gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails for supporting the baskets, means for directing water containing solids over the rails into the baskets, said means including covers extending over the rails for preventing vertical drop and resulting deposit of solids on the rails, and means for removing the baskets.

2. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly recovering the washing water,

a decantation basin following the gully and com-- municating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails mounted along the walls of said gully and basin for supporting said'baskets, means overlapping the spaces between the baskets and the walls of the gully and of the basin to direct the washing water into the baskets and to prevent vertical drop and resulting deposit of impurities on the rails, and means for removing the baskets.

3. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly recovering the washing water, a decantation basin arranged after the gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the said basin, movable and iiftable covers overlapping the spaces between the baskets, rails mounted along the walls of said gully and basin for supporting said baskets, means including inclined ledges overlapping the spaces between the baskets and the walls of the gully and basin to direct the washing water into the baskets and to prevent vertical drop of impurities on the rails, and means for removing the baskets.

4. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully arranged for directly collecting the washing water, a decantation basin following the gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, movable and liftable covers overlapping the spaces between the baskets, inclined ledges overlapping the spaces between the baskets and the walls of the gully, edge covers hingedly mounted along the walls of the basin overlapping the spaces between the baskets and the walls of the basin, chains for raising said edge covers, rails for supporting the baskets in the gully and the basin, the rails in the sully being arranged below the inclined ledges and the rails in the basin being arranged below the hinged edge covers, and means for removing the baskets.

5. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising 'a pre-decantation gully forvdirectly collecting the washing water, a

, and of the basin, joint covers for overlapping the spaces between the baskets, other covers for overlapping the spaces between the baskets and the walls of the gully and basin, rails for supporting the baskets, said rails being arranged in recesses in the walls of the gully and of the basin above the zone where the mud is deposited, and means for removing the baskets.

6. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly collecting the washing water, a decantation basin following the gully and com-- municating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottoms of the gully and of the basin, said bottoms having portions declining towards the center and projecting inwardly slightly above the side edges of the bask ets, rails for supporting the baskets, said rails being arranged below the projecting parts of the said declining bottoms approximately at the level of the upper edges of the baskets, and means for removing the baskets.

'7. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly collecting the washing water, a decantation basin following the gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails for supporting the baskets, means extending over the rails for causing the impurities deposited from the washing water to flow into the baskets and for preventing vertical drop of impurities on the rails, and means for removing the baskets.

8. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pre-decantation gully for directly collecting the washing water, a

decantation basin following the gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails supporting the baskets, and a lifting apparatus for removing the baskets from the gully and from the basin. I

9. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a pie-decantation gully for directly recovering the washing water, a decantation basin following the gully and communicating therewith, movable baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails for supporting the baskets, a drain, and connections between said drain and the bottoms of the gully and of the basin whereby said bottoms may be emptied into the town drains.

10. Apparatus for cleansing water used for washing vehicles comprising a rare-decantation gully for directly collecting the washing water. a decantation basin following the said gully and communicating therewith, baskets arranged one after the other in the bottom of the said gully and of the basin, rails for supporting the baskets, a lifting gear for removing the baskets, a filtering chamber arranged after the decantation basin, a reserve vat of water arranged after the said chamber, a drain, and connections between said drain and the bottoms of the gully, of the basin,

of the decantation chamber, and of the reserve vat whereby said bottoms may be emptied into the main drainage.

m PIQUEREZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2432756 *Jan 15, 1944Dec 16, 1947Henry W HapmanSludge tank having a u-shaped conduit having arm portions inclined downward to the lower part of said tank and a conduit opening into said tank connecting said portions
US2564443 *Aug 4, 1947Aug 14, 1951Palotsee John JWasher for articles or the like
US2651311 *Oct 24, 1945Sep 8, 1953Kewanee Ind Washer CorpCleaning apparatus with lubricator therefor
US2678733 *Dec 15, 1950May 18, 1954West Point Mfg CoStraining apparatus
US2783892 *Mar 19, 1956Mar 5, 1957Kolene CorpApparatus for cleaning metal
US3378018 *Sep 27, 1965Apr 16, 1968Dura CorpApparatus for the reclamation of liquids used in vehicle washing
US3393689 *Oct 31, 1966Jul 23, 1968Kolene CorpBottom-dumping sludge pans
US3421526 *Dec 27, 1966Jan 14, 1969Michael S PolizziCarwash system
US3447545 *Aug 30, 1967Jun 3, 1969Dura CorpReclamation of liquids used in vehicle washing
US4616377 *Oct 19, 1984Oct 14, 1986Industrial Innovations, Inc.Recycled liquid cleaning system
US4619015 *Oct 2, 1984Oct 28, 1986Industrial Innovations, Inc.Vacuum loading cleaning system
US4672710 *Aug 19, 1985Jun 16, 1987Industrial Innovations, Inc.Single pressure vessel cleaning system
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US4696073 *Aug 19, 1985Sep 29, 1987Industrial Innovations, Inc.Recycled liquid cleaning system
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US5127417 *Dec 28, 1990Jul 7, 1992Whirlpool CorporationSoil separator for a dishwasher
US5184635 *Dec 28, 1990Feb 9, 1993Whirlpool CorporationFluid handling system for a dishwasher
US5247953 *Feb 12, 1992Sep 28, 1993D.E.M. Controls Of CanadaWelled sump for use in chemical process machinery
US6247480 *Jun 18, 1999Jun 19, 2001Ez Environmental Solutions CorporationPressure washer containment assembly and method with a passive skimmer
WO1993001958A1 *Jul 17, 1992Feb 4, 1993Chassijet LtdMethod of and apparatus for washing a vehicle and separating resulting sludge from a washing liquid
WO2001042066A1 *Dec 12, 2000Jun 14, 2001Gross Terry RWashing facility
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/237, 134/76, 210/299, 134/111, 134/123, 134/104.4
International ClassificationB60S3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB60S3/00
European ClassificationB60S3/00