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Publication numberUS2139777 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1938
Filing dateDec 9, 1937
Priority dateDec 9, 1937
Publication numberUS 2139777 A, US 2139777A, US-A-2139777, US2139777 A, US2139777A
InventorsSkok Alois, Noble O Binley
Original AssigneeSkok Alois, Noble O Binley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric and automatic fuel vaporizer
US 2139777 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1938.

A. SKOK ET AL ELECTRIC AND AUTOMATIC FUEL VAPORIZER Filed Dec. 9, 1957 Patented Dec. 13, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELECTRIC AND AUTOMATIC FUEL VAPOR IZER 6 Claims.

Our invention relates to electrically energized and automatically operated Vaporizers, adapted for fuels used in the internal combustion engines, said fuels belonging to the hydrocarbon class and/or their derivatives, which are of high or low flash point and involatile liquid or gaseous form.

Therefore, an object of our invention is to provide an element, which is placed within the intake passage of the internal combustion engine, said element being adapted to receive and maintain a temperature supplied by the electrical energy while it passes therethrough, thus causing said element to be heated at the temperature required and consequently causing the disintegration of the fuel into a gaseous form.

Manifestly, an object of our invention is to provide a vaporizer which is electrically heated and which will cause the passing gases to become disintegrated into fine gaseous atoms, and therefore, causing quick ignition of the gaseous charge in the cylinders of the engine and consequently preventing the formation of the carbon therein.

Further object of our invention is to provide said vaporizer with means for controlling the air passage into the intake manifold of the internal combustion engine, so that an additional volume of air may be intermixed with the heated gases and thus increasing the volatility of the gas mixture.

Another object of our invention is to provide a magnetically energized contact point which will cause the electric current to flow through the heating element, so that the fuel vaporizer may be effected and so maintain during the operation of the engine.

Further object of our invention is to provide a suitable vacuum cylinder which is connected to the intake manifold of the internal combustion engine, :and which is provided with a suitable contact means for allowing the electric current :to pass therethrough and to the heating element of theapparatus during the operation of the engine.

\ Another object of our invention is to provide said heating element with a suitable mounting adaptor, which is for holding said element in central position and in the path of the passing atomized fuels, coming from the carburetor, and which is so arranged whereby the maximum heat may be maintained at the point or a place where the gases must invariably pass through and, therefore, breaking up the gas molecules in readiness for the combustion.

Further objects and advantages of our invention aswill hereinafter more fully appear, we attain by the construction herein shown on the drawing and described in the specification forming a part of our application.

Reference is had to the accompanying drawing, in which the similar reference characters denote the similar parts.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 shows-the partly elevational and partly I cross-sectional view of the heating and controlling apparatus, taken on the line |l of the Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 shows the top view, partially cross-sectional, showing the heating elements and their connections, taken on the line 22 of the Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 shows the cross-sectional view of the insulators taken on the line 33 of the Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 shows the top elevational view of the air valve taken in the direction of the arrow 4.

Fig. 5 shows the apparatus connected to the instrument board, having its connection extended in modified form.

Describing our invention more in detail, said invention comprises an element 2, the vacuum controlled switch 4, which is also provided with an air valve member 6, and which inter-connects the vacuum cylinder 8, including the intake manifold I0, also having a supplemental air valve I2, provided with an air inlet needle control l4.

Said element 2 comprises a pair of conically spiral coils l5 and 18 respectively, which are made of suitableelectrical heat resisting material, and which, has the small ends 20 and 22 respectively connected to the bushings 24, one on each end thereof, said bushing being mounted upon a stud member 26 and supported in place by means of suitable nuts 28, so that the radial space 30 between said coils l6 and I8 is approximately th of an inch.

In order to hold said stud member 26 in proper position, and within said manifold Hi, the stud end 32 is attached to a cross bar member 34, and held in place by means of lock nuts 36, so that a relatively central position of the said element 2 within the manifold It! may be had.

Said cross bar member 34 is placed within a recess 38 of the adaptor 40, which is made of insulating material having its contact end 42 ext I8, suitable lead .ends 48 and 50 are connected .5;

to the copper washer 52, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3.

Said adaptor 40 is provided with suitable holes 54 which correspond to the size and the position of the bolts used in bolting the carburetor flange 56 to the said manifold flange 46, and, said adaptor 40 is also provided with suitable passages 58 and 60, which are threaded as shown and adapted to hold in place the said air valve member 6 and the supplemental air valve I2.

The air valve member 6 comprises a body 62 which is provided with a chamber 64 wherein a suitable valve seat 66 is placed and which is adapted to receive an air passage central member 68 of which, one end is pointed as at 10 in conformity to the said valve seat 66, while the other end is threaded, as shown, for inter-engaging the said body 62 and to provide the necessary adjustment for the volume of air which may pass through, and which, may be locked in place, in adjusted position, by means of the locking nut 12.

Said body member 62 is provided with a side outlet passage 14 having a threaded socket 16 which is to receive the threaded inlet section 18 of the said cylinder 8; said cylinder 8 comprising a cap member which is provided with a suitable neck member 82 and to which the insulating bar member 84 is attached, and, the said neck member 82, through its passage, is provided with a guiding collar 86 for the purpose to hold the stem member 88 in place.

The end 80 of the said stem 88, within said cylinder 8, is provided with a washer 92 and also having a retaining cup member 94 associated therewith, which is held in place by means of a lock washer 96 and the nut 98, as shown, while the other end I00 is provided with a pair of lock nuts 102 which are connecting the transverse bar member I84, having a hole I06 provided therein to insure free movement of the stem end I00 when the apparatus is in operation. In order to hold the transverse bar member I04 and the cup member 94 in a relatively upper position, in order to break the points of contact I08, said stem member 98 is provided with a suitable spring member I I0, which is held in place by means of a washer H2 and locked in place by means of a pin I I4.

The said switch 4, comprises an insulating bushing I6 which is held in engaged position to the said insulating bar 84 by means of the shank member I I8, also, it is provided with a locking nut I22, while the extended end is provided with the contact element I24, thus forming the contact point I88.

Said transverse bar member I04 is provided with a suitable insulating strip I26 having a resilient member i28 attached thereto by means of a rivet I38; said resilient member I28 comprises a loop end I32 which is provided with the contact element 34, while the other end extends parallely to the end of the said transverse bar I04, being held therein by means of the contact rivet I36, then, said resilient member forming a U-turn as at I38 in order to provide a springing effect for the said bar member I04, and, in order to hold it in its relative position, a suitable bracket I40 is provided therein, which is held upon said insulating bar 84 by means of suitable screws I42 and to which the end I44 of the said resilient member I28, is attached, as shown.

The said transverse bar member I04 is also provided with a magnetic contact plate I46, which is positioned in a close proximity to the core I48 of the magnet member I50, which is positioned upon the end I52 of the said insulating bar 84, so

that, the suction produced by the pistons within the engine cylinders will cause the cup member 84 to move downwardly, closing the contact point I08, or, by energizing the magnet member I50, the magnetic influence will cause the core member I48 to attract the contact plate I46, and closing the said contact points I08, the purpose and the operation'of which will be presently described.

ment 2, a suitable electric current source may be In order to provide heat energy to the said eleused, such as a storage battery I54, which is provided with lead wires I56, connecting the contact rivet I36, also, having a lead wire I58 connecting the switch I60, and which connects the lead wire I62 of the magnet member I50: said magnet member having a lead wire I64 connecting the manifold ground wire I66, which is grounded as at G. When the contact points I08 are closed, by the action of the suction influencing the piston cup 94 of the cylinder 8, or, by closing the switch I60, the current passes through the lead wires I56 to the resilient member I28, passing through the contact element I34 to the contact element I24, which leads into the contact rod I 20 and to which a lead wire I68 is attached, thus passing the current to the wire end I10, which is connected to the contact end 42 oi the cross bar member as at I12, and thus allowing the current to pass through the stud 26, which causes the current to heat the element ends 20 and 22, and then passing through the lead ends 48 and 50 to the contact plate 52, and finally to the ground wire I66 in completing its circuit.

When the engine is functioning the elements 2 will be heated as soon as the suction, created by the action of the piston in the cylinders, will cause the cup 94 to be drawn downwardly, causing the contact points I08 to close, or, when deemed advisable, the switch I60 may be closed, causing the magnetic influence in the magnet I50 to energize the core I48, which by attracting the contact plate I46 will close the contact points I08, then the passing current flowing from the battery I54 I will heat the elements, so that, when the atomized fuel vapor passes therethrough the heat will cause the vapor to vaporize said fuel, and will break down the atomic structure of the passing vapor, causing said vapors to become highly volatile and thus insuring perfect combustion.

It may be noted that in order to insure the volatility of the gases, it is invariably necessary to supplant an additional volume of air, therefore, the said supplemental valve I2, connected to said adaptor 40, is provided with a valve seat I14, which is positioned within the valve body I16, and wherein a plurality of passages I18 are positioned, so that, by increasing the opening between the valve seat I14 and the port I80 of the needle valve I4, more air may pass therethrough and into the chamber I82, further, because of the position of the air inlet 60 in respect to the interperiphery of the said manifold opening or chamber, the rushing air will cause said mixed gases to whirl and therefore insuring the mixing of the gases with the new coming air.

Further, it may be noted, that in order to prevent possible spark from the contact points I08, which may become a cause for igniting gases, a suitable cover I84 is provided, enclosing said contact switch 4 of the said apparatus, and having the valve member 6 provided with a suitable tubular extension I86, the end of which connects with the passage 58 at the adaptor member 40, as shown in Fig. 5.

While we have thus described our inventionwith great particularity it will be clear that the same may be modified throughout a wide range.

We, accordingly, do not propose to be limited to the exact details of construction herein shown and described in the specification, but reserve the rights in practice to make necessary changes and modifications, which may come within the scope of the appended claims.

We claim as our invention:

1. In the apparatus of the class described, comprising, electrically heating means positioned in the manifold and the path of the passing gases, adapted for vaporizing the hydrocarbon fuel while passing through the intake manifold of the internal combustion engine, a magnetically influenced switch means connected to said apparatus 'and associated with said electrically heating means for automatically closing the electric current controlling switch, thus, causing, the electric current to pass through the said electrically heating means and for allowing pre-heating of the said heating means before and during the operation of the internal combustion engine.

2. In the apparatus of the class described, com.- prising, automatically controlled and electrically heated means positioned in the intake manifold and the path of the passing hydrocarbon gases, adapted for heating and disintegrating the hydrocarbon fuel, while passing through the said intake manifold of the internal combustion engine, a magnetically influenced switch means associated with the said last mentioned means for causing the electric current to pass through the said heating means, and, an air valve member associated with said apparatus having its inlet air passage positioned at the inter-periphery of the said manifold and in close proximity to the said electrically heated means for causing the incoming air to inter-mix with the passing gases and thereby increasing the volatility of the heated vapors.

3. In the apparatus of the class described, comprising, electrically heating element means positioned in the intake manifold and in, the path of the passing hydrocarbon gaseous fuel which is used in the internal combustion engine, vacuum controlling means associated with said electrically heating means for automatically controlling the electric current passing to the said heating means, and valve means connected to said manifold at a close proximity to the said heating means for controlling the passage of air into the said manifold and for causing whirling effect upon the mixed gases therein.

4. In the apparatus of the class described adapted for vaporizing the fuel passing through the manifold of the internal combustion engine, said apparatus having a source of electric current associated therewith, and comprising, an adaptor member positioned between the carburetor and the said manifold, an electrically heating element centrally positioned within said manifold and in the path of the passing fuel gases, a vacuum controlled means connected to said adaptor, and a contact means associated with and controlled by the said vacum means for controlling the flow of the electric current through said contact means and to the said heating element.

5. In the apparatus of the class described adapted for vaporizing the fuel passing through the manifold of the internal combustion engine, comprising, an electric heat element positioned within the passage of said manifold and in the path of the passing fuel vapors, a vacuum valve controlling means connected to said heat element for controlling the electric current passing therethrough, and air valve means connected to said manifold for controlling the air flow into said manifold and for inter-mixing the vaporized fuel with an additional volume of air and therefore increasing the volatility of the combustive gaseous vapors.

6. In the apparatus of the class described, adapted for vaporizing the fuel passing through the manifold of the internal combustion engine, comprising, a source of electric current, a magnet member associated with said apparatus for controlling the passage of the said electric current, a contact switch member positioned in close proximity to said magnet member, an electric element positioned within said manifold and in the path of the passing gaseous fuel and connecting the said contact switch, and a magnet controlling switch inter-connecting said source of electrical current, so that, when said switch is closed the electrically energized magnet will cause the magnetic influence to close the said contact switch and allowing the electrical energy to flow through and heat the said element, for causing the passing gaseous fuel to become dis integrated.

ALOIS SKOK. NOBLE O. BINLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2719520 *Jan 28, 1952Oct 4, 1955Ralph H BalzerInternal combustion engine fuel vaporizer
US2873349 *Oct 4, 1957Feb 10, 1959Le Roy E ClarkInternal combustion engine manifold heater
US3053342 *Mar 18, 1959Sep 11, 1962Mansoff Arthur PercivalInternal combustion engine
US3197613 *Feb 15, 1962Jul 27, 1965Dow Chemical CoElectric fluid heating device
US3373726 *Feb 17, 1966Mar 19, 1968Walter A. AlbrechtFuel vaporizer for internal combustion engines
US3492457 *Sep 14, 1967Jan 27, 1970Frederick G SubtFuel heating element
US3850152 *Sep 28, 1972Nov 26, 1974Hollins J RVehicle internal combustion engine air intake heating means
US3915137 *Mar 4, 1974Oct 28, 1975Hugh K EvansFuel vaporizer
US3934567 *Mar 27, 1974Jan 27, 1976Hitachi, Ltd.Fuel evaporating device
US4187819 *Jan 26, 1978Feb 12, 1980Roberto LongobardiFrusto-conical, spiral fuel economization and pollution reduction device for use with carburetors of internal combustion engines
US4325344 *May 30, 1980Apr 20, 1982Nippon Soken, Inc.Fuel evaporator
US4326491 *Jan 25, 1980Apr 27, 1982Burchett Lawrence RFuel heater
US4377148 *Dec 16, 1980Mar 22, 1983Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaFuel mixture heating device of an internal combustion engine
US4395993 *Oct 17, 1980Aug 2, 1983Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaFuel mixture heating device of an internal combustion engine
US4397287 *Sep 15, 1980Aug 9, 1983Jocelyn PierardMethod and apparatus for liquefying and/or heating a fluid
US4463721 *Mar 22, 1983Aug 7, 1984Nissan Motor Company, LimitedVibration suppression system for diesel engine
US4512322 *Jul 12, 1982Apr 23, 1985Ct Harwood LimitedEngine preheaters
US4611567 *Aug 13, 1984Sep 16, 1986Covey Jr Ray MVaporizer/carburetor
US4712531 *May 8, 1985Dec 15, 1987Hitachi, Ltd.Apparatus for adjusting specific volume of intake air for engine
US5666929 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 16, 1997Tyma, Inc.Fuel vaporizer for an internal combustion engine
US6508210Feb 26, 2001Jan 21, 2003Tyma, Inc.Fuel supply system for a vehicle including a vaporization device for converting fuel and water into hydrogen
US7487765Oct 16, 1997Feb 10, 2009Cummins, Inc.Intake air heater and air delivery assembly for engines
DE19643943B4 *Oct 31, 1996Feb 22, 2007Cummins Inc., ColumbusAnsaugluftzuführaufbau
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/549, 392/485, 219/207, 338/218, 123/552, 392/398
International ClassificationF02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/435, F02M1/00
European ClassificationF02M1/00