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Publication numberUS2140077 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1938
Filing dateApr 27, 1937
Priority dateApr 27, 1937
Publication numberUS 2140077 A, US 2140077A, US-A-2140077, US2140077 A, US2140077A
InventorsFuchs Eugene A
Original AssigneeFuchs Eugene A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure cap for containers
US 2140077 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1938.

E. FUCHS CLOSURE CAP FOR CONTAINERS Filed April 27, 1957 k w, 5.....1; AM"

anon/ 15.

Patented Dec. 13, 1938-- UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 9 Claims.

This invention relates to closure caps for containers, and more particularly to that type of caps which are pivotally connected to the container so as to swing into open and closed posi- 5 tion.

The general object of the invention is to provide an improved closure cap of this type which shall consist of a minimum number of parts, so that it will be exceptionally cheap to manufacture, and which at the same time will be simple and convenient to manipulate and eflicient in operation.

To this end the invention contemplates forming the cap and associated parts of a single piece of material, having projections formed integral therewith to provide the pivotal connection so that the necessity for the usual pivot pin is obviated.

The invention is applicable to containers of many different types, such, for example, as collapsible tubes, bottles, powder cans, and larger containers such as storage batteries, gasoline tanks, and the like.

In order that the invention may be readily understood, reference is had to the accompanying drawing, forming part of this specification, and in which:

Fig. l is a plan view of my improved closure cap, as applied to the neck of a collapsible tube;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section therethrough, substantially on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 isa front elevation thereof;

Fig. 4 is a vertical section similar to Fig. 2, but showing a slightly modified construction, and illustrating my improved cap as applied to the neck of a bottle;

Fig. 5 is a vertical section similar to Fig. 2, but showing a modified construction of cap app ied to the mouth of a powder can;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the top of the powder can, with the cap removed;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the sifter top shown in Figs. 5 and 6, but illustrating a slightly modified construction; and

Fig. 8 is' a perspective view showing my improved closure cap and also the neck of a container to which it is applied.

Referring to the drawing in detail, and more particularly first to Figs. 1, 2 and 3 thereof, l designates a collapsible or other tubular container having a neck 2. Projecting laterally from this neck at one side thereof is a relatively thin fiat lug 3, having a rounded outer end, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. l, and provided in its flat faces with a pair of opposed sockets or recesses 4, shown as cup shaped.

The neck 2 carries at the side opposite the lug 3 a locking lug 5, the purpose of which will hereinaiter more fully appear.

My improved closure cap itself is designated in its entirety by the reference numeral '5. It may be stamped from sheet metal or molded from some thermoplastic composition such as Celluloid, or hard rubber.

Extending from one side of the cap 6 is a portion I which is bent around, as indicated at 8, so as to provide an arm 9 extending substantially parallel with the portion 1, the parts designated by the reference numerals 1, 8 and 9 thus together forming a U-shaped structure. This is so proportioned as to be adapted to embrace and fit over the lug 3, as clearly shown in Fig. 2.

The opposite arms I and 9 of the U-shaped structure described, are pressed in to form inwardly directed projections l0, adapted to engage and fit within the sockets or recesses 4.

It will thus be seen that these projections l engaging in the sockets 4 constitute a pivotal connection between the cap and the lug 3, about which pivot the cap may swing transversely into and out of closed position.

At the side of the cap 6 opposite the portion 1 is a projecting portion ll which is folded back upon itself, as indicated at l2, and terminates in a lip l3, adapted to engage under the locking lug 5, as shown in Fig. 2, in order to hold the cap securely in closed position.

In order to insure the tight seating of the cap, the end surface or edge of the neck 2 is preferably formed on a plane which makes a slight angle with the axis of the neck, as illustrated at 2 in Fig. 3. This angle is small, probably approximately being sufllcient.

It will be understood that the flat faces of the lug 3 lie in planes which are at substantial right angles to the axis of the neck, while the end of the neck itself is on a slightly inclined plane, as above described. In view of this, it will be understood that when the cap is swung about its pivot to closed position, that is tosay, in a clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. l, and toward the left as viewed in Fig. 3, the cap will ride up on the inclined upper edge of the neck and thus be caused to seat tightly thereagainst. The cap 6 is preferably lined with a gasket 14 of cork or other suitable yielding material, as shown in Fig. 2, so that when the cap is moved to closed position, the gasket will be pressed tightly against 55 the upper edge of the neck, thus producing an effective seal.

In order to increase the compressing action exerted on this gasket as the cap is closed, the under surface of the locking lug I, which is engaged by the lip It, may be slightly inclined, as indicated at 5' in Fig. 3, this inclination being in a direction the reverse of that of the upper edge of the neck.

Preferably the material. such as sheet metal or molded composition, of which the cap 8 is made, is elastic or springy, so that the U-shaped structure formed by the parts I, 8 and 9 is resilient, and the arms may be forced apart and will then return to their original position. When such material is used, it will be understood that the rounded projections Ill are formed in the arms I and 8 when the cap is made, and that then, when the U-shaped structure is forced over the lug go 3, the projections ill snap into the recesses 4, thus forming the desired pivotal connection. When thermoplastic material, such as hard rubber, is employed, the U-shaped structure may be softened by heat, to facilitate assembly. In either .5 case, the device is exceptionally easy to assemble.

In some instances, however, it may be desired to form the portions 1, l and 9 of sheet material which is substantially non-resilient. In this case, the U-shaped structure will be applied to 30 the lug, and then the projections l0 pushed into the-recesses by means of a suitable punch.

In Fig. 4, I have shown my improved cap as applied to the neck I of a glass bottle, such as a milk bottle or the like. In this figure I have 11- lustrated a slightly modified construction in that the lug 3' on the bottle neck is provided with but a single recess or socket 4, this preferably being formed on the lower surface of the lug, as indicated. The upper surface of the lug 3, and also the arm I of the cap, are left flat. In other words, a single recess or socket and a single projection are relied upon in this case to establish the pivotal connection, instead of the pair of recesses and projections shown in Fig. 2. A suitable gasket H' is also preferably employed.

Referring to Figs. 5 and 6, i5 designates a can of the type commonly employed in dispensing dry powder and the like. This has the usual neck I6.

Over this neck It I place with a forced friction fit a sifter top comprising a perforated portion I! and a cylindrical portion or collar i8. This collar portion is offset at one side, as indicated at l8", to receive the vertical portion IQ of a thin flat lug 20, having an opening 2| therethrough. Thus this lug 20 is carried by the cylindrical portion i8 of the sifter top and projects laterally therefrom.

My improved sheet metal cap itself is illustrated at 22, and is shown as having a portion 23 extending therefrom at one side, this portion being bent back upon itself at 24 to provide an arm 25 extending parallel with the portion 23, the parts 23, 24 and 25 forming, as before, a U- shaped structure adapted to embrace the lug 20.-

An opening 26 is formed in the lower arm 25 and is constructed to register with the opening 2| formed in the lug 20. A rounded projection 21 is punched down from the portion 23 and extends into and through the opening 2| in the lug 29, and preferably into the opening 26 in the arm 25. This projection 21 working in the opening 2| constitutes a pivotal connection, as in the previously described constructions, about which the cap 22 may be swungtransversely to open and closed position over the sifter top. At the side of the sifter top opposite the lug 20 is provided a locking lug 28, this beingpreferably formed by cutting or punching out and folding over a portion of the cylindrical part i8. The top 22 is also provided as before with a projecting portion 29 folded over upon itself and terminating in a lip 30 adapted to engage under the locking lug 28.

Referring to Fig. 7, I have shown how the pivot supporting lug may be struck out from the material of the cylindrical portion I8 itself, as indicated at 20, instead of being formed as a separate element, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. This will further simplify the construction.

In Fig. 8, I have illustrated the same type of cap 6 as is shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and the same reference characters designate similar parts. The cap 6 is shown as adapted to fit over the neck 3| of a container which may be in the nature of a receptacle or tank, such, for example, as the gasoline tank of automobiles, or a storage battery case.

It will, of course, be understood that I contemplate making the tops of the container necksshown in Figs. 5 to 8, inclusive, inclined at a slight angle, as illustrated in Fig. 3, if desired, in order to insure closer engagement of the closure cap therewith.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the same general principle of construction runs through all of the modified forms illustrated in the drawing, namely, the provision of a pivotal connection by means of one or more projections, formed integral with the cap, engaging in a socket or sockets carried by the container neck. In Fig. 2, a pair of such projections and sockets are shown, while in Fig. 4 only a single projection and socket are illustrated. In Figs. 5, 6 and 7, the socket takes the form of an opening which extends entirely through the pivot lug, but performs the same function as the recess ill in the other modifications.

In all of the forms, it will be noted that the necessity for the usual pivot pin, with its attendant difficulties of assembly, has been obviated, and that the means for constituting the pivotal connection is formed integral with the cap itself.

What I claim is:

l. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having a socket in one of its flat faces, and one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said socket and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck.

2. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having a socket in one of its fiat faces, and one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed rounded projection, said arm being resilient, whereby, when said U-shaped structure is forced over said lug, said projection will snap into said socket, thus pivotally connecting the closure cap to said lug.

3. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having aligned recesses in its opposite flat faces, and the arms of said U-shaped structure having aligned inwardly directed projections adapted to engage in said recesses and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck.

4. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having aligned recesses in its opposite flat faces, and the arms of said U-shaped structure having aligned, inwardly directed, rounded projections, said U-shaped structure being resilient, whereby when it is forced over said lug, said projections will snap into said recesses, thus pivotally connecting the closure cap to said lug.

5. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin fiat lug projecting laterally therefrom and lying in a plane at right angles to the axis of said neck, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having a socket in one of its flat faces, and one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said socket and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck, the end of said neck lying in a plane disposed at a slight angle to the axis thereof.

6. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having a socket in one of its flat faces, and one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said socket and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck, a locking lug projecting from the side of said neck opposite to the first mentioned lug, and a lip carried by said cap and adapted to engage under said locking lug when the cap is swung to closed position.

7. The combination with a container neck, of a relatively thin flat lug projecting laterally therefrom and lying in a plane at right angles to the axis of said neck, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, said lug having a socket in one of its fiat faces, and one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said socket and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck,

the end of said neck lying in a plane disposed at a slight angle to the axis thereof, a locking lug projecting from the side of said neck opposite to the first mentioned lug, and a lip carried by said cap and adapted to engage under said locking lug when the cap is swung to closed position.

8. The combination with a container having a neck, of a cylindrical member closely encircling said neck, a relatively thin flat lug carried by and projecting laterally from said member, said lug having a socket therein, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said socket and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck.

9. The combination with a container having a neck, of a cylindrical member closely encircling said neck, a relatively thin fiat lug carried by and projecting laterally from said member, said lug having an opening therethrou'gh, and a closure cap of sheet material having a portion extending from one side thereof and bent back upon itself to form a U-shaped structure adapted to embrace said lug, one of the arms of said U-shaped structure having an opening adapted to register with the opening in said lug, and the other of the arms having an inwardly directed projection adapted to engage in said openings and thus constitute a pivotal connection about which said closure cap may swing transversely of said container neck.

' EUGENE A. FUCHS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2625306 *Feb 23, 1950Jan 13, 1953Owens Illinois Glass CoDispensing closure
US5083671 *Apr 27, 1990Jan 28, 1992Anchor Hocking Packaging CompanyClosure for a wide mouth container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/557, 222/542, 215/235
International ClassificationB65D41/04, B65D41/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/06
European ClassificationB65D41/06